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Full text of "San Francisco News Letter (July-Dec. 1907)"

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D 2007 1202231 M /^RY. 

California State Library 




Accession No... . 
Call Wo..' 



Calhoun and the Carmen. Orchard and Kelly. 



Established July 20 1SS6 




(tiulifaxumlKbtotxtx %tx~ 



Price 10 Gents 




SAN FRANCISCO, CAL, SATURDAY, JULY 6, 1907 



$4 par Year 



Glorious 

is*nt IT? 




the hats of the nation to those 
level-headed Americans who knew 
what they wanted when they wanted it 
and got it: and generations lived to shout 
their praises. Before national pride goes 
personal pride; self-respect: self-assertiveness and a 
determined purpose to possess the best one can afford. 
That spirit has made Sozodont the national dentifrice. 
People must have the best. And why is Sozodont 
the best dentifrice? Because every ingredient is scien- 
tifically selected and blended by experts : every bottle, 
can and tube, is thoroughly cleansed and antisepticised 
before being filled by machines that do not permit of the touch of 
human hands to the engredients. Sozodont is thoroughly hygienic : 
is approved by best dentists and sold all over the world. Sozodont 
is the original American dentifrice. The genuine costs no more 
than substitutes. Every bottle of Sozodont, every can of Sozo- 
dont Tooth Powder, every Tube of Sozodont. Tooth Paste leaves 
a trail of brightness in beautiful teeth and happy smiles. Remember the 
name Sozodont. Ask for it. Get it. 

HALL & RUCKEL, New York City 



-• 

• 

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• 

* 

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• 



■jLr iSiggTl -JLr tanaan JL ^s.:m.;l -JLr <5jg£3 -JLr ^h«3 -JL- <^^T] -JL- t&mu\ jt *B5E] "^ «BHBH "W - «M»aiJ ^fa 



— -/ 





Southern Pacific 



Ticket, Office, Flood Building 
San Francisco 




VACATION TIME HERE 

WHERE WILL YOU SPEND IT? HOW WILL YOU GO? 

WHAT WILL IT COST? 

Questions often asked. 
OUR SUCGESTIONS:-- 

Shasta and Mountain Resorts. Klamath and 
Crater Lakes. Lake Tahoe. Yosemite. Kings 
and Kern Canyons. Santa Cruz and Mountain 
Resorts. Boulder. Wrights. Laurel. Mt. 
Hermon. Glenwood. Capitola. Del Monte. 
Monterey. Pacific Grove. Paso Robles Hot 
Springs. El Pizmo. 

Hunting, Fishing, Boating. Bathing, Mountain 
Climbing. Cottage, Tent., Camp Life, Excellent. 
Hotel Accommodations. Low summer vacation 
rates via 




SUNSET ROUTE 

Two fine fast daily trains between San Francisco, Los Angeles 
and New Orleans over the Coast line. Road of a thousand won- 
ders—through orange groves of Southern California and cotton 
fields of the South. 

THE SUMMER WAY ON A WINTER DAY 

Dining and parlor car service— library and cafe— drawing room 
sleepers through without change. Personally conducted tourist 
parties to Chicago, Cincinnati, St. Louis, New Orleans and Wash- 
ington. 

Ask Agents 

SOUTHERN PACIFIC 



O. F. Willey 
Company 



Estab- 
lished 
1855 



Have re-opened at 

1 9 Fell Street, 

Near Market Street. 
San Francisco Tel. Special 336 



165-167 13th St. 

Bet. Madison and Jackson Sts. 
Oakland Tel. Oakland 6062 



With a full lino of 



Surreys, Runabouts, Etc. 



COME AND SEE 



142005 




View from Merchants' Exchange, looking north. The Appraisers' Building in 
center, and New Zellerbach building on the right. 




Vitv frot tfid Sansome si 

Insw ponies in foreground. 






REBUILDING OF THE BURNED DISTRICT OF SAN FRANCISCO. 




4* 



\ (t 




The 



Egyptian 

Cigarette 

of Quality 

AROMATIC DELICACY 

MILDNESS 

PUR.ITY 



At your Club or Dealer's or 
THE SURBRUQ CO., Makers, New York 



V 



! % 



If you are in 
need of 

Flesh, Blood 

or a 

Healthy Sleep 




If you want to 
■„"5f~ regain jour 

iVs Strength 8 Vigor 



or process 

both of them 



Dse the 
Wholesome, Tempting and Most Nutritious 

Original World's Tonic 



Malt- Marrow 



INDORSED BY THB PORE FOOD COMMISSIONERS. 

RECOMMENDED BY ALL LEADING PHYSICIANS 





Sold Everywhere 

It your dealer hasn't it 
send your order to 

Wm. Hunt 
COAST AGENT 

3rd 8 Townsend Streets 

San Francisco 




Insist Dpon Having 

Matt Marrow. Don't take 
substitutes 

Wm. Hunt 

COAST AGENT 

3rd &' Townsend Streets 

San Francisco 



J V 



,J> 




ALL THE LIGHT DOWNWARD 
WHERE IT BELONGS 



THE 

"RAMSDELL 

CLUSTER" 



illustrated above represents the newest, best and most economical method of interior lighting. It is 
an ideal light for illuminating business places of all kinds. It is as convenient as the electric light; 
and enhances the appearance of goods and furnishings coming within its rays, and the cost is not 
more than one-fourth that of electricity for the same candle power. The lamps used in this fixture 
are the Ramsdell Inverted Gas Lamps which are recognized as the standard inverted lamp of the 
world. Each individual lamp gives 65 candles of light and consumes only from 2 1-2 to 3 feet of 
gas per hour, which makes it the most economical light known. Many instances can be referred to where the "Ramsdell Cluster" 
is now giving vastly greater volume of better light at less than one-third the cost of the former illumination by electricity. Circulars 
and prices will be forwarded upon request. 



The Gas and Electric Appliance Company 



5O0 Haight. Street., San Francisco, Calif. 




3 £g3 FjgAM@at©^ 




(tfalif axnmjCbtotxti zzx~ 

Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast. 




VOL. LXXIV 



San Francisco, CaL, July 6, 1907 



No. 1 



The SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor, Fred- 
erick Marriott, at 905 Lincoln avenue, Alameda, California, and at 773 
Market street, San Francisco, Cal. Telephone — Alameda, 1131. San 
Francisco — Temporary 3594. 

Entered as second-class matter. May 12. 1906, at the Postofflce at Ala- 
meda, California, under the act of Congress of March 3, 1879. 

New York office — (where information may be obtained regarding sub- 
scriptions and advertising) — 206 Broadway, C. C. Murphy, representative. 
London Office — 30 Cornhill. E. C, England. George Street & Co. 

All social items, announcements, mining, commercial and financial 
news notes, advertisements or other matter intended for publication, 
in the current number of the NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA AD- 
VERTISER, should be sent to the Alameda office not later than Thurs- 
day morning. 

Lot it read this way hereafter : The old graft dies, but 

never surrenders. 

"Wttry do the heathen rage?" Because they have been 

caught in the act. 

The more Roosevelt says he won't have it, the more lh •■ 

people say he shall. 

Only things to eat and drink and weal arc high in price. 

Happiness is at the same old figure. 

The political end of the prosecution's game is not likely 

to win, now that everybody sees through it. 

If Rudolph Spreckels could make San Francisco just as 

he would have it, would the difference be observable? 

— i — No, it is all a mistake. There is no scheme on foot to 
re-name San Francisco and call the town "Spreckelsburg." 

Count Boni intimates that he is willing to take back his 

wife, but at a largely increased stipend for his outside establish- 
ments. 

Roosevelt says "Taft is a man of boundless courage." We 

knew lie was large, bu1 did net suppose his dimensions could not 
lie measured. 

'The Kaiser says he is going to build the strongest battle- 
ship that can be constructed. Name it "l.iinbiirgor" and you 
will have it. 

Sehmitz is trying awfully hard to go into tyring 

business, but lie doesn'l seem to have tile right line of good- to 

please the trade. 

The chief aim of the average girl al this season of the 

year is to see how many men sh< ge herself to — summer 

resort engagements 

Hearst says Bryan shall not lia\e the nomination, and 

Bryan says Hearst shall not have it. Tk oolong well 

for the l lemoc ai ] 

— i — When lawyers call one another liars, the public is war- 
ranted in assuming they know what they are talking about, and 

lake their word for it. 

A dozen or so Vale students have signed a pledge to raise 

large families. That's all right if — that is to say But 

you know what we mean. 

It's no use. That Central American dove of peace might 

just as well perch upon the top of the tallest tree and see the 
fun. The Generals are getting hungry. 

Afler all. Rllef is the one sensible grafter. He is not put- 
ting up a nickel to lawyers to prevent the inevitable, and his 
savings will come in bandy when be gets out. 

Marrow sa\s he will prove that Orchard is tlh' biggest liar 

that ever lived. But what has that to do with the guilt of the 
Miners' Union and Mover, I' and Haywood? 

Out of their own months, the witnesses in the Ha 

D&ively that in a former existence they were 
Chinese pirate! re greatly degenerated since then. 



[Eugene says he is leading a miserable existence. No 

doubt he is not having the fun he had when leading an orches- 
tra. 

Is it fear of displeasing Japan that the Government hesi- 
tates to send the battleship squadron to the Pacific waters? But 
of course the nation would not show the white feather in that 
fashion. 

The time was, that when the jury found a man guilty he 

was carted off to prison, but these days he is supplied with an 
automobile to ride away to "consult his lawyers and dine at 
home." 

The fact is. Schmitz's whiskers and pomnadour will have 

to go: so will his dress suit and automobile. That is the time 
when the difference between forethought and after-thought is 
fully understood. 

As to women engaging in gainful pursuits, she should not 

do so — unless she has a husband to support, or no husband 
at all. If the latter, she should gel one. and if the former she 
should bounce him. 

It is to be observed that King F.dward's ambassador o 

the United States. Mr. I'.rveo. is not mentioning that little 
private compact between England and Japan, but he is talking 
freely upon every other subject. 

As between a millionaire man buying a .'bonis girl for 

a wife and a millionaire girl buying a foreign titled snob for a 
husband, the former is rather the better citizen, though neither 

is burdened with common -eii-o. 

A little while ago. Sehmiiz was hobnobbing with kings 

ami the like over in Europe. Vow be is in jail. Then he was 
Mavor of San Francisco. Vow be is not. The moral of ; 
Stick to your fiddle and avoid labor unions. 

"How did I get acquainted with my husband? It was this 

way: He was -f i.-c. i i n ^r bis auto al a fearful pace and ra 

my first husband He fell il hi- duty to attend the funeral. He 

iiuroduced himself and expn — »l - 

Bryan wants to know what lie |i 

is easy. Ii needs to get rid of the Bryan 

ie Hearats first, and then resurrect the p ij J Bferson 

and Jackson, and forever afterward hold on to them. 

Not SO many year- ago, Chili talked as if she would 

like to blow the Pacifi United States inlo thi 

die of the ocean. It was that incident that started I 

in the warship business. Than for waking him up. 

According to Lawyer Darrow, Haywood and his 

should not only be acquitted at once, bul I 
gize for the wrong it has done them, and give the 
purse to compensate them for the time thi - . Why not 

- on them for lit 

The fraternity of pi „ - that the women 

of America are gradually b 

the preachers are making ' 

good Lord put it into the heart of I nil ami alarmist 

1'reacher to get down to hi- -Ming. 

It is the duty of thi 

whom the Grand Jury has in 1 

to represent assumes then it until their guilt is 

established beyond a doubt. The lav 

men as the "higher 0] - 

lo be, but the pros 

guilty in any event. There is such a >n haunting 

guilty minds. 




SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 6, 1907. 



UNION LABOR CONFESSIONS. 

Orchard is busy trying to make his confessions incriminate 
his former associates in crime. His confessions are an atrocious 
collection of sickening revelations. He represents an element 
that is always present in every country, under any flag, the ele- 
ment that may be termed chronic discontent. Its true repre- 
sentative is the fanatic, the bigot who. whether he be a resident 
of free America, of Czar-ridden Russia or of tolerant England, 
may under no sort of conditions ever become reconciled to the 
existing order of things, but must always be in the forefront of 
the forces that make for darkest anarchy. 

Orchard is not singular in his bigotry, and his fanaticism, for 
right here in California it were no task at all to find men ready 
and willing to commit murder for "the cause of labor.** We 
have educated and uneducated malcontents. The educated ones 
are generally too cowardly to engage in any physical foray 
against the opposing forces of law, order and decency. They 
prefer to fight in the dark, hire the columns of obscure sheets in 
which to vomit their lucubrations. Whenever Father Yorke de- 
sires to rid himself of an accumulation of bile, it is not through 
the agency of such a journal as self-respecting citizens read that 
he emits the effluvia (and he is only one among many), but 
through the columns of some journal not too far away from San 
Francisco nor too uncomfortably near Livermore. that he makes 
his distress known by an overflow of illy-digested cyclopedic 
knowledge and dictionary diarrhoea. 

Orchard is not of the intellectual class. He is one of the 
illy-equipped mortals that demagogues such as Yorke, Cornelius 
and Furuseth find useful as tools. You will never find one of 
the three above-mentioned worthies touching off a mine or 
throwing a bomb. They are physically too cowardly to take such 
chances for the "good of the cause.*' Rather will you find them 
insidiously working on the minds of such men as Orchard, 
Adams or Kelly (the man arrested last week in San Francisco 
for ditching an elevated railroad train in New York), and sug- 
gesting that 'hey become martyrs to "the cause," while the 
Yorkes will gather the glory and the notoriety, the Corneliuses 
would get the cash and divide with the Furuseths and the Mc- 
Carthys and the Bowlings and all the rest without any attendant 
risk. 

Kelly is a curious psychological study. He is somewhat akin 
in character to Orchard, except that he does not in any way in- 
dicate who are those who suggested to him his dastardly acts. 
Here is his voluntary confession to the San Francisco police: 

"I was a motorman," he said, "up to the time of the strike 
in New York. You see," he continued, with great attention to 
details, "the uncoupling of cars on the elevated is done by elec- 
tricity from the motor, which is on a separate car. The throw- 
in? of switches also is operated by electricity from the motor. 
That was where T got my idea. 

"It was the night before we were going to strike. T was carry- 
ing a fine load of passengers. When we approached Ninth 
avenue and L street. I remembered there was a switch there. We 
were going at almost a mile a minute clip, and I slipped on all 
the power. When my trucks struck the switch T uncoupled the 
motor. Instantly T threw the switch in front of the racing but 
uncoupled cars behind me. I passed on up the line safely, but 
the cars were ditched and wrecked. I am told that six persons 
were killed." 

The detectives could hardly believe their ears while this re- 
cital was proceeding, and believing that perhaps Kelly had in- 
tended merely to wreck the train, asked : 

"What did'you do it for?" 

"I figured," Kelly replied, "that my little trick would cost 
the company about half a million of dollars. There was the 
smashing of the ears; the damage suits of those who would be 
maimed, and the actions to be brought against the company by 
the heirs of those who would be killed." When reminded that 
his confession probably would land him in the electric chair, 
Kelly remarked that he would still be ahead, anyway. 

"I made the company more trouble than it could' make me," 
he said. 

Here we have the bigotry and the fanaticism of the middle 
ages. This is the expression of one of the illy-equipped, the 
idea of the man who was born wrong. It may be argued with 
some show of good reason that a crime committed under these 
circumstances is very much like an act of insanity. When Kellv 
reaches New York, a thorough investigation should reveal the 
suggestive power that gave him a justification for his actions. 



In the city jail of San Francisco there are some fifteen or 
twenty men awaiting trial or sentence for crimes that have been 
committed since the car strike began. These men are all of 
them of about the brain calibre of KeJly and Orchard. They 
belong among the mentally deficient, but it is safe to assert that, 
without the approval which they suppose they have received, of 
such men as Yorke, Furuseth and McCarthy, they would have 
been content to live a life of much less evident or violent crime! 

The men who threw the chain over the wires of the United 
Railroads did it because they thought they were doing a noble 
thing; the men who grease railroad tracks, in the hope of maim- 
ing scores of people who ride are just the same as Orchard, 
Adams or Kelly, fighting for "a cause." The man who crushes 
the head of a pedestrian, like an egg-shell, with a brick, does 
not do it because he likes the job, but because it has become a 
sort, of religious duty. He is imbued with a fanaticism by his 
fellow outlaws, such as Yorke, Furuseth and McCarthy, because 
they, not being mentally deficient, are fully capable of realizing 
that they may be made to undergo physical suffering should 
they offend. And thus it is that these men, not one of them 
a true representative of labor, unionized or otherwise, always 
work out their plans in the dark, the visible evidences being the 
uncouth, undeveloped, mentally deficients such as Orchard, 
Adams, Kelly and the thousands of the lowest elements who are 
the parasites on the real, useful, dignified and honest labor ele- 
ment. The mass of this element is honest, it is true, and it is 
dignified and proud of its achievements, but it is also unfortu- 
nate in the protection it affords such criminals as the Kellys 
and Orchards, and it is cursed by the leadership of such seekers 
after notoriety and financial profit as the Yorkes, the Furuseths 
and the McCarthys. 



MR. CALHOUN AND TEE CARMEN. 

Mr. John D. Spreckels, it is advertised, has not spoken in 
his brother, Mr. Rudolph Spreckels. for twelve years. Mr. John 
D. Spreckels is the left hand of Mr. Clans Spreckels, and Mr. 
Rudolph Spreckels, since the reconciliation effected between the 
irascible old sugar king and his clever son. is the right hand. 

This explains the following, which appeared Monday in the 
Call: 

"If Mr. Patrick Calhoun would assume a somewhat more 
conciliatory at'itude, it is not impossible that an amicable set- 
tlement of the street-car muddle might be arranged. Mr. Cal- 
houn must realize that existing icnnditions are satisfactory 
neither to his stockholders nor to the traveling public. It is 
true that he is running his, cars, or some of his cars, but the 
service is deficient in many particulars. According to the state- 
ment given out by the United Railroads, they are operating with 
a force of about one thousand men, which is less than half the 
customary roll. The people are getting about half the service 
that they ought to have, and the condition of the cars as to over- 
crowding in the rush hours is worse than ever. Moreover, a con- 
siderable number of citizens are not riding on the street cars, 
and they will not ride so long as the strike continues. Their 
money is just as good as anybody's, and there is a lot of it. Mr. 
Calhoun should do a little figuring and count it up. His com- 
pany is under no little expense keeping up fortified boarding 
houses for the men in his emplov. Conditions are neither nor- 
mal nor profitable. There will be no dividends as long as the 
strike is in operation. The position is such that both sides C3" 
afford to make concessions." 

Here is the answer which suggests itself to the News Letter. 
The carmen voluntarily broke their agreement to arbitrate all 
differences. The carmen voluntarily quit the employ of Mr. 
Calhoun. Mr. Calhoun stands for the "open shop." Mr. Cal- 
houn, after several bitter experiences, has decided that he will 
not recognize Mr. Cornelius. Mr. Calhoun is running his cars. 
Mr. Calhoun is giving the public a better service with a smaller 
force. Mr. Calhoun is not pulline political chestnuts out of the 
fire for Mr. Spreckels or the Spreckels family. He owes no 
more duty to the Spreckels family than he does to any other 
hunch of clever financiers and politicians. His duty is to the 
public, to that large and long-suffering majority of the public 
who are woefully tired of the peculiar financial and political 
philanthropy of the Spreckels clan. The trouble with the Spreck- 
els outfit is. that the public always pays the freight, and in the 
end there is always a charge of excess baggage that goes to fill 
the Spreckels coffers! Remember the Valley Road! 

How would Mr. John T). Spreckels relish the interference of 



July 6, 1907. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



the News Letter in case of a quarrel between himself and one or 
more of his employees? There is enough known of his rigid 
characteristics to Eoreeast that he would resent, as insulting, and 
rightly, too, a suggestion from a competitor to negotiate with 
an employee who, when offered a place, and who, being dis- 
charged on that account, still argued a right to dictate to those 
willing to take up his work, or to his former employers, to return 
to the work he has neglected. 

And in conclusion, and because it has a bearing on the ques- 
tions at issue to-day, the News Letter suggests that the people 
of San Francisco remember the philanthropic and financial part 
played by the benevolent Spreckels family in "Independent 
Gas !" 



NEED OF ANOTHER NAVY YARD. 

It was reported recently from the National Capital that the 
General Board of the Navy had recommended the sending of sev- 
eral battleships to the Pacific Coast, and that the Secretary of 
the Navy had asked the President to give him authority to send 
a considerable part of the battleship fleet recently gathered at 
Hampton Roads to the Pacific Ocean. It was said that Admiral 
Dewey, President of the General Board of the Navy, was in favor 
of sending some of the battleships to the Pacific, not as a threat 
against any nation, but to test the seaworthy qualities of the ves- 
sels. Naval officers are disposed to think that the present con- 
dition of affairs calls for the presence of several battleships on 
the Western shore of the United States. It has, however, since 
been denied that the Navy Board has any intention of sending 
any battleships at all to this Coast, where there are inadequate 
facilities for their repair and maintenance. The Pacific squad- 
ron is short of coal, and it has been found necessary by the Navy 
Department to make a contract with a New York firm for the 
shipment of coal from the Atlantic to the Pacific in British ves- 
sels. Shipments of 15,000 to 20,000 tons each are to be sent 
to the Navy Yard at Mare Island and to the Naval Station at 
Bremerton, Wash. The department, no doubt, regrets the neces- 
sity of shipping coal in foreign bottoms, but it points out that 
the coal is American. 

There are only two navy yards on the Pacific Coast, at Mare 
Island, Cal., and Bremerton, Wash., and both of these have 
as much work as they can attend to already. They could not 
look after another fleet. Another navy yard and drydock arc 
needed on the Pacific Coast. Some time in the future it will 
become necessary to maintain battleship Meets on the Atlantic 
and Pacific Coasts. Then an additional navy yard, say at San 
Diego, will be required. The Navy Board considers that there 
is great need of increased docking accommodations on the 
Pacific Coast, and lias suggested that the Government should 
purchase the Union Iron Works of San Francisco, which possess 
docks capable of receiving the largesl battleships. Or a third 
navy yard mighl be established at San Diego. The Navy 
Board recommends thai the naval station at Suing Bay in the 
Philippines be completed as soon as possible. 



CORPORATION LICENSE TAX. 

The Secretary of State of California has issued a circular let- 
ter In all the corporations doing or having the right to do business 
in the siate. giving notice thai license taxes in accordance with 
the nev, lav musl be p i November 30th, or the ce 

tions will cease to exist The lowest license tax under the law is 
ten dollars for a corporation having an authorized capita 
of ten thousand dollars, and the highest is $250 for a corpora- 
tion having a capital of one million and less than five million 
dollars. Many mining companies, country banks and oil com- 
panies ilizcd for large amounts, but very small sum? 
really been paid in. Many of the oil companies are not 
doing any busini the price of oil is too low to enable 
them to sell their product at a profit. The country hanks in 
particular arc complaining about the new law. Their dil 
say that they hive issued only enough capital to enable them ti 
carry on their business, and that the higher capital named in 
their a ^corporation was intended to meet the increased 
business communities. The new law requires that 
the tax be paid for the full amount of capital authorized, no 
matter how little has actually been paid in. If the law is en- 
forced strictly, main corporations that are practically dormant 
will be driven out of > 



BUSINESS MEN, WARE UP! 

As the municipal campaign will soon begin, it is none too soon 
to call attention to the fact that the deplorable condition in which 
San Francisco finds herself to-day is due not a little to the in- 
difference or even worse which the conservative and business ele- 
ment has shown to municipal politics. For one reason or an- 
other, business men, men who had large property interests in the 
community, men who are vitally interested in the welfare of 
the town, have either passively allowed the socialistic and graft- 
ing element to get in control or have actively contributed to that 
end by their votes. It is notorious that Sehmitz could never 
have been elected three times Mayor unless he had had the sup- 
port of men outside of union labor ranks. Indeed, his chief 
mentor and arch manipulator of labor unionism belonged to a 
profession which is expressly excluded from joining the ranks 
of labor unionism. 

What has been the result i Let us face the truth, even if it be 
unpleasant : There has been a loss of confidence in the city, 
which has hurt it in the money markets of the world. It has 
been unable to market its securities, and is held up to the attacks 
of the Eastern press as being even worse than it is. With all its 
graft and corruption, San Francisco has a smaller debt than any 
city of half its size in the country. Regardless of fire and labor 
unions, it is rebuilding rapidly, and has a future which its 
ambitious rivals either in Southern California or on Puget 
Sound cannot rival successfully ; but admitting all that, the 
city could be far more advanced, could be in a much better con- 
dition, would have far less difficulties to overcome, had it had 
a conservative and honest municipal administration, and it will 
be worse than folly not to take advantage of the elections this 
fall not to redeem it and put it where it belongs. If there ever 
was a business election in the history of politics there is going 
to be one in this town this fall. 



TRAINING IN COAST DEFENSE. 

On account of the loneliness of the posts, the Coast defense 
service is always short of men, and in case of war there would not 
be anything like enough men to handle the big guns intended to 
protect San Francisco. It is intended, therefore, to dispense with 
the annual encampment and maneuvres at Camp Alascadero and 
to give the National Guardsmen some training in coast defense. 
The Seventh Regiment of the National Guard of California will 
go into camp at the Presidio, San Francisco, from duly 6th to 
20th, and the Fifth Regiment will report at Fort Rosecrans. San 
The Guardsmen have already had a little training in 
handling big guns, but will receive a much more thorough drill 
this year than ever before. San Francisco bay, both sides of the 
entrance to which are lined, from Point hobos to Fort Winfleld 
Scott, and from Point Bonita to Fort Baker, with guns on dis- 
appearing platforms, so emplaced as to command a wide ex 
tent of the ocean, is an ideal spot for maneuvres of this kind. 
The National Guardsmen an alar artillerymen will spend 

two weeks side by side, and it is hoped that the Guardsmen will 
pick up a Me amount of valuable experience. 

Powerful searchlights are being set up along the shores of 
olden Gate, and the Guardsmen will recei in the 

art of picking out a vessel by the aid of a search-light and then 
training a gun upon it. In the maneuvres the hostile vessels 
will be represented by launches out at sea. which will make a 
night attack upon the harbor. I rohnson flapgood, as- 

sistant to the Chief of Artillery, in his report to the Secretary of 
War. will recommend the expenditure of *■ strengthen 

tat defenses of San Francisco bay. The defense of the port 
of >an Francisco, on account of its nearness to the open ocean, 
the strong currents running through the Golden Hate, and the 
prevalence of fogs al of the year, involves 

I difficulties, but the War Department is evidently making 
a serious effort to cope with t: 

When Orchard asked to amend his testimony, there wtH 

a flurry in the court room, but it subsided when he said there 

'iree more murders to add to his list which he had : 
ten to mention while making the first list. 1 
full of religion that he ean"t tell a lie. 

The brigands who held up everything and everybody will 

ir just dues, hut what spectacle- 'ice they present. 

I Tweed gang in New York faced the music an: 
ine like men — real brire men. 



6 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Jdlt 6, 1907. 



FIRE-PROOF CONSTRUCTION. 

A great fire, resulting in the sacrifice of hundreds of human 
lives and the loss of many million dollars' worth of property, is 
possible in every city of the United States. The calamities of 
Chicago and Baltimore might be duplicated in New Orleans or 
St. Louis. An earthquake in New York equal in intensity to 
the one in San Francisco would cause an appalling loss of life 
and property. Investigations made by three of the most compe- 
tent structural experts in the country have led them to the con- 
clusion that there are no absolutely fire-proof buildings. Not 
that fire-proof buildings are impossible, for, according to these 
experts, structural materials may be so selected and used that 
adequate fire protection is practically assured; but in the effort 
to cheapen construction in order to obtain greater interest on 
investments, owners of buildings have neglected or ignored perils 
to lives and fortunes. 

Soon after the San Francisco earthquake, the Interior De- 
■partment at Washington, through the United States Geological 
Survey, assigned to Richard L. Humphrey, Secretary of the 
National Advisory Board on Fuels and Structural Materials, 
and Professor Frank Soule, dean of the College of Civil Engi- 
neering of the University of California, the task of investigating 
the action of the fire and earthquake upon so-called fire-proof 
buildings. At about the same time the War Department as- 
signed a similar task to Captain John Stephen Sewell, Engineer 
Corps, U: S. A., whose reputation as an expert on fire-proof 
building construction is international. After a thorough investi- 
gation, these officials have prepared a careful report, which has 
just been submitted to the Interior Department, and will soon be 
published by the Geological Survey. The conclusions presented 
in this report are of great interest and value. 

Mr. Humphreys, emphasizing the fact that the lessons of the 
Chicago and Baltimore fires are still unlearned, declares that 
a rented}' for existing conditions can be had only by the enact- 
ment of strict building laws, which will compel fire-proof con- 
struction. Professor Soule estimates that the earthquake caused 
directly less than 10 per cent of the total loss at San Francisco, 
and that of the subsequent and indirect effects — paralyzing of 
the water supply and its distributing system, the starting of a 
fire impossible to extinguish with the means at hand, the death 
of at least 500 persons, the destruction of $500,000,000 worth of 
property, and the remoter damage to business, commerce and 
labor — nearly all might have been prevented by wise foresight 
and provision. Captain Sewell points out the fact that fires and 
fire tests have proved conclusively the inadequacy of commercial 
methods of fire-proofing as at present applied. 

The recommendations of the experts as to the essentials of 
fire-proof construction are definite and positive. High, steel 
frame office buildings, properly braced, are declared to be stable 
and reliable, and re-inforced concrete structures are placed high 
among materials well adapted to withstand earthquake and fire, 
while hollow tiles and hollow concrete, although not in the past 
universally successful, may be so employed as to yield most satis- 
factory results. Concrete floors with metallic mesh re-inforce- 
rhents are strongly recommended for strength and fire resistance, 
and wire glass, metallic rolling shutters, and metal sash have 
proved such excellent fire protectors that wise economy de- 
mands their use in every important building. Other materials 
and measures equally important are enumerated, and it is be- 
lieved that their adoption, while involving increased cost of con- 
struction, will insure permanence of structure and at the same 
time greatly reduce rates of insurance. 



OIL ON THE WATER. 
The News Letter publishes the following as a warning to the 
offending miscreants who pour oil into San Francisco bay, and it 
is hoped some one brave enough will be found to drag a big cor- 
poration into the courts for the offense before miles of dockage 
are burned as a direct result : "The Court of Appeals of the 1 (iff- 
trict of Columbia held, in the case of Brennan Construction 
Company vs. Cumberland, et al., that where petroleum residuum 
and coal tar escaped from a tank owned by the appellant into 
the Potomac river and was carried about four blocks below to a. 
point where plaintiffs, who were engaged in the business of hir- 
ing, building and storing boats, had their boat-house, causing 
damage to the appellees, the escape of the oil from the appel- 
lant's tank was the proximate cause of the injury, and that the 
appellant was liable whether or not it was guilty of negligence 
in respect of the escape of the oil." 



THE ORIGINAL MR. TIGHT. 

Abe Ruef spends his afternoons motoring along the beach, and 
his evenings trying records of grand opera stars on his new pho- 
nograph, varying the programme occasionally by reading the 
"best sellers" and the ten-cent magazines of fiction. He smiles 
placidly and grows fat. He is saving his money all right, all 
right. He has two lawyers, neither of whom have ever risen 
to the dignity of a "has been." Richard Connors was admitted 
to the bar after serving a few years as Abe's office boy, and 
George Keane — weii, George is earning whatever salary Abe 
gives him. You can find him any time of the day pounding out 
briefs on an ancient typewriter, making copies for Abe's case. 
Abe will ever continue a "Titan among tight wads." 

In the meantime, Heney is un and at it morning, noon and 
night, and many a midnight finds Langdon's "assistant" poring 
over law books, trying to weave the net that will catch the big 
'uns and hold 'em tight. Heney looks worried these days. You 
can bet that Abe doesn't. But then, Abe isn't competing with 
Heney for dexterity in keeping perfect pace with the spot-light of 
diurnal history. Heney furnishes all that gratis. 

And say, by the way, there is nothing that delights the ex-boss 
so much as the fact that his "confession" — Heaven save the 
mark — was wired around the world. It would make a granite 
gargoyle hysterical with the giggles to hear Abe tell about the 
time he set the news wires a-sizzling. 

But the tumultuous Francis J., who would give battle to the 
Ten Commandments if he thought that the other side were in 
favor of them, certainly keeps things a-humming around his 
office. Ask the boys. Too busy even to send his usual vitupera- 
tive, voeabularistic, vitriolic epistles to the daily dope sheets. 
How we miss the tabasco sauce ! 



CORNELIUS THE FINANCIER. 
The announcement by Cornelius that unless the banks would 
agree to loan money on real estate he would, order all union men 
to withdraw their deposits is perhaps the most absurd form that 
unionism, even in this community, has assumed. Exactly how 
this all-powerful dictator is to know who has and who has not 
deposits, be does not explain, and it is hardly to be expected that 
the banks will furnish him with a list of (heir depositors. But 
passing that feature of the affair, is it conceivable that even 
a man of Cornelius's limited mentality can suppose that the 
banks will permit him to dictate to whom they shall loan, and 
for what amounts, and for what time? Of course, they are to be 
responsible to their depositors for the loans just as though they 
made them on their own judgment. The arrogance and absur- 
dity of this man and his fellow* has certainly reached the limit, 
and even the most benighted unionist must be ready to call a halt. 
If not soon suppressed, members of unions will have to consult 
McCarthy or Cornelius or Casev when they desire to marry or 
to build a home, or to have children. The world — even in Rus- 
sia — has no examples of a worse despotism than these union lead- 
ers are seeking to impose upon their fooljsh followers. 



Specially Adapted for Asthma, Hooping Cough, Croup; Brooks Ho- 
meopathic Cough Syrup; 25 cents at Druggists. 




Xchas.ke;ilus& co 
EXCLUSIVE 

HIGH GRADE CLOTHIERS 

No Branch Stores. No Agerjtt. 



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We consider ourselves commercially responsible for every single gar- 
ment that leaves this shop. Knowing how they're made with every care 
to detail infuses such confidence. We are not in that class of "molly- 
coddle" clothiers. 

Out prices are not bated on speculative charges at the tcsinnina of a season 
with forethoughts of "making a sale'* later.' Others again, use trie slightest 
pretext to offer "non-exiitable bargains." Our clothes are correct and good 
in style, fabrics and price, consequently, no sales here. 



KING SOLOMON'S HALL, 

lli.iore Street, near Sutter, San Francisco 



JtlXY G, 1907. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



Tfe@ M5iMsft®jr ©ff F©r@ngnfl AifMrs 

■Japan's New Battleship. 

While (he delegates to the Hague Peace Congress early last 
week were congratulating themselves on the signs of peace and 
a seeming awakening of a sentiment among the nations that 
armaments might at least be discussed, the news flashed from 
Tokio that the largest and most powerful battleship ever con- 
structed in the world had been successfully launched, and that 
her twin ship would soon be on the ways. The Aid, for that : s 
the name of Japan's new floating fortress, is superior in every 
way to England's great and formidable Dreadnaught, and the 
rejoicing in Japan when the Aid touched the water indicates 
anything but a willingness to suspend work on the nation's war 
establishment. It is admitted that Japan is in a position as no 
other nation is to know by experience what type of battleship is 
likely to be the most destructive iu the present, and for many 
years to come. It is true that this nation had a little experience 
in handling battleships in our war with Spain, but Japan is 
the only nation that has employed them on a large scale, and 
the nations are well aware that the weakness in them was dis- 
covered by Admiral Togo, and that the secret will not be com- 
municated to other nations. For this reason, what the size 
and type of the ships of Japan's new navy are to be is a matter 
of great concern to the nations. Until some days ago it was not 
believed that Japan was financially able to enlarge her navy very 
much with battleships that cost about $10,000,000 each, but 
that item of expense seems to be provided for in the recently 
negotiated treaty between Japan and France, some of the pro- 
visions of which are just now made public. Although this treaty 
is separate and distinct from the lirilish-Kusso-Franco-Japanese 
treaty, it is in harmony with it. only that it is an offensive and 
defensive alliance to some extent, ami provides for the marketing 
of certain loans of Japan by French bankers. This would seem 
to settle the question of money for Japan. And in the matter of 
floating foreign bonds, no nation is as will able to do it as 
France. Instead of pulling their money in savings banks, the 
French people as a whole invest their Bayings in such foreign 
bonds as the Paris bankers recommend. They hold not far from 
two billion dollars in Russian securities, mid il is estimated that 
they have fully if not more inves.ted in the Ohited States. With- 
in the last six months, they took fifty million in American rail- 
■way bonds — a new- issue. There will be no occasion, therefore, 
for Japan to suspend work on her navy or on her public improve- 
ments because of a scarcity of ready cash. 

* * * 

. I / I lie Hague. 

Nothing bus been accomplished at the Hague of a definite 
character, hut exchange of opinion in a diplomatic way. "feel- 
ers," so to speak, indicate a sincere desire to provide for the 
adjustment of international disputes without resorting to w.w. 

but on the other hand, not a really important question has been 

reached, ami until a vital mal comes up for discussion, the 

real tone of the convention will not be known. It is announced 
that the Congress is prett\ sure to adopt the American plan for 
ilie collection of foreign debts, but that may mean anything. 
If, however, the South American plan is meant, it is doubtful 
if the announcement is even semi-official, for England, IV. 
Holland and Germany arc known to be hostile to the collection 
plan of the Latin Si. i es. Tiie only policy thus far suggested with 

anything like a decided ring was Great Britain's intimation that 

under 11,1 circumstan I from her old poli, \ 

capturing and confiscating the enemy's merchant ships and any 
other 10 him or his subjects. Whether the 

question "ill he formallj i to the Congress remains to 

en. The strength of England in time o( war lies in her 
ability to quiekh swoop the seas of her enemy's merchant marine 
and to quickly convert subsidized liners into cruisers for the 
purpose of destroying the enemy's commerce, and it would he 
a waste of words to tr) to persuade bei 90 great an ad- 

vani i But it will take the several com- 

mitii - oight yet to formulate questions of really i 

Enough moves have been made. 
however, to sho\i w that England, I ind 

Japan are >ut. and : 

'nation in. 
all that is worth d the Far East, including shaping 

the t I hina in all thin 




The Congo Again. 

King Leopold is spending much time in Paris these days on 
matters concerning the Congo Free Slab'. As has been staled 
by I be News Letter at different times, the Slate reverts to France 
if Belgium surrenders supervision of it, ami France's palms arc 
itching for it now that its great wealth and greater possibilities 
are known. But Leopold has given notice that he intends to 
hold onto the State as Belgian territory, although his ministers 
ami a large following of his subjects are opposing him with 
might and main. A crisis has already been reached in his cabi- 
net, and there is a suspicion that France is secretly widening the 
breach, but as iigaiusl this, Germany stands ready to espouse the 
cause of Leopold as against France, and that again adds new 
complications and dangers — it is not believed Germany would 
place herself openly on the side of Belgium without a secret 
compact that would give the Kaiser a substantial footing in the 
Congo, which would be opposed vehemently by Great Britain 
as well as by France. It is conceded that however the Congo 
affair may be patched up, it is bound sooner or later to be one of 
the most dangerous factors in European politics. Thus far, 

Leopold has rather outwitted them all. 

* # * 

Nicholas Tells Why. 

The Czar has made it very plain why he prorogued the doum'a. 
He says he found that it would do nothing but obstruct legisla- 
tion ; that it had not discussed a single bill or measure for the 
betterment of Russia; that he will try it again, confining the 
right of suffrage to tax payers; if the next douma does not legis- 
late for tin 1 good of the country, he will dissolve it, and kec| 

electing and dissolving until he can get. a Parliament that will 
talk politics less ami attend to the business of the empire more. 



When a labor union maintains a murder bureau and ar 

inner circle to say who shall be murdered, the lime has come to 
reduce the population of thi' world by the most direct way, 
whii h is the rope route. 



The music at the Little Palace Hotel is a feature that 

lends much to the enjoyment of the visitor. The orchestra is 
unusually g 1. 



(T 



*\ 




K, 



FIRST OVER THE BARS 

AND 
BEST OVER. THE BARS 



HUNTER 
RYE 



THE 

AMERICAN GENTLEMAN'S 

WHISKEY 



CHARLES M. REYNOLDS CO. 
Agents foi California and Nevada, 
i Folsom St.. San Francisco. Cal. 



j 



SAN" FEANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 6, 1907. 



UBBARMteTAELE 




California has never possessed a more charming writer of verse 
than Mabel Porter Pitts. The second edition of her book, "In 
the Shadow of the Crag"' is just from the press of the Smith- 
Brooks Co., Denver. It is a handsomely bound and illustrated 
volume of over three hundred pages, and includes many of the 
author's later poems that were, of necessity, omitted from the 
first edition. Mabel Porter Pitts's reputation as a poet has been 
earned by faithful adherence to the promptings of artistic and 
imaginative faculties that in her are developed to a surprising 
degree. She has a particular genius for metrical composition, 
and this is joined to a talent for imagery and power of expres- 
sion that forms a pleasing vehicle for creations marked by both 
wit and originality. 

* * * 

Welcome's Exposure Record is a book of some two hundred 
and sixty pages, memorandum size, gilt edge and lettering, cloth 
bound with flap fastener and pencil. A book that is I'mind in 
the pockets of a good proportion of our friends who follow pho- 
tography in England. Several pages are given to an explana- 
tion of the principles which underlie correct exposure, table fof 
focusing by scale, developing factors, formulae and the like. 
Buled pages for recording exposures and a most convenient 
exposure disk on the last inside cover. If your dealer cannot 
show you one, send fifty cents to Burroughs Wellcome & Co., 45 
Lafayette street, New York. 

* » * 

Josephine Tozier has prepared a book called "The Traveler's 
Handbook," on novel lines, and if there is anything that is of 
value to the traveler to know that is not contained within the 
covers of this little volume, it must be something of no moment 
whatever, for it seems as if Miss Tozier must have exhausted 
an unusually fertile imagination in suggesting means of meeting 
emergencies and making trans-Atlantic travel a pleasure. 

Funk & Wagnalls Company, New York. 

* * * 

Messrs. Paul Elder & Company, the Western publishers who 
have recently removed their publication headquarters from San 
Francisco to Jvew York, announce the opening of an arts and 
crafts book room in the latter city, at 43 and 45 East Nineteenth 
street. This book room, though not as extensive, will express 
much the same purpose as their San Francisco store, which Dr. 
Lyman Abbott, in the Outlook some years ago, described as "the 
most artistic and charming book store I ever visited, east or west, 
m America or Europe." 

* * * 

Harold Roberts, for some time head of the Foreign Depart- 
ment of the American Tobacco Company, has acquired an in- 
terest in Mc-Clure's Magazine, and will hereafter be associated 
with the MeClure Publishing Company. This puts an effective 
quietus to the rumor that the next expose work of the MeClure 
investigators would be devoted to the Tobacco Trust in its vari- 
ous ramifications. Had Mr. I.'ockefeller only thought of it he 
could have saved Miss Tarbell a great deal of work by merely ac- 
quiring an interest in four or five of the leading monthlies The 
oil magnate could easily afford this means of purchasing im- 
munity. " - 
» * * 

«r G ?° T %i ^ rn ^ r , d Shaw ' s new volurae of P la J s will be entitled, 
John Bull s Other Island"— the "island" is Ireland, and the 
play deals with England's troubles therein. The volume will 
also contain "The Doctor's Dilemma" and "Major Barbara." 
ihe book will be published by Brentano's. 

* * * 

"Wild Life at Home," by R. Kearton, does not, as the title 
would indicate treat of domestic affairs. It is merely a contri- 
bution to the "nature" literature of the day. 

* * * 

Dr. Robert W. Wood of Johns Hopkins TJniversitv, author of 
the one-syllable scientific treatise, "Fluorescence" and "Magnetic 
Rotation Spectra of Sodium Vapor and their Analysis " is now 



RENTAL LIBRARY 



BOOKS TO READ TEN 
CENTS PER WEEK. ALL 
THE NEW NOVELS. ASK 
FOR PARTICULARS 



BLAKE'S BOOK STORE 



646 VAN NESS AVENUE 



engaged on an important volume showing the essential difference 

between such birds and flowers as the crow and the crocus, the 

auk and the orchid, the parrot and the carrot, and the sparrow 

and the asparagus. Much confusion has hitherto existed in the 

minds of nature students on account of the marked resemblances 

between certain birds and plants, and Dr. Wood's volume will 

no doubt be accepted as a standard. 
* * * 

Mrs. George Curnock's "A Girl in her Teens, and What She 
Ought to Know," is to be published by Cassell & Company in the 
fall. If intended for American consumption, the book would 
seem to be a work of supererogation, as there is not much that the 
American girl in her teens does not already know. 



SOMETHING NEW 

MORAGHAN'S 

RESTAURANT AND BUFFET 

24-26 ELLIS STREET, NEAR MARKET 



SIGNS 


THAT 

ELITE SIGN CO. 


SHOW 


199 Stevenson Street 


San Francisco 




E. A. DEFRIES, Mgr. 





Paper of Every Description. 



A. ZELLERBACH & SONS 

405 Jackson Street, San Francisco. 



514 Eleventh St., Oakland 
114 K St., Sacramento. 



113 N. Los Angeles St., L. A. 
54 First St., Portland, Or. 



Zadig & Go. 

Stock Brokers 



Tonopah, Goldficld, Bullfrog, 

Manhattan and Comstocks 

a Specialty 



Formerly of 306 Montgomery Street, have resumed business In their 
own building 324 Bash Street, directly opposite the new San 
Francisco Stock and Exchange Building. 



BEKINS VAN AND STORAGE 

Household Goods shipped to or from the East 
and South at reduced rates. 

968 .Broadway, Oakland, Cal. 

San Francisco Los Angeles Chicago 



July 6, 1907. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



9 




/tar OeCntrlHiotfe't/ni/ art ami?' 
Ooe tbtl villploY M* devil.sir, with foil. 



The strikers ask. "Why should the city pay the poller for 

protecting Calhoun's cars!''" 1 suppose because his passengers 
think they have as much right to be protected as to be brick- 
batted. In the Mission, only the brave or the suicidally inclined 
dare ride. As to Dinan, he undoubtedly has his mission, but it 
is a foreign one. God grant he may soon fill it. Dinan is an 
objecl lesson in official inefficiency, and is of no more use than 
a scarecrow in an empty corn field. Drastic measures by thai 
rudimentary figure-head would have solved the strike question 
weeks since. The city needs soldiers. What are the authorities 
waiting lor? The moh is an animal whose powers of discrimina- 
tion between patience and weakness are somewhat vague. Of 
course, Calhoun will win. But why defer his victory? Is there 
any reason why we should ibe subjected to delay? We arc first an 
objecl of pity, then of benevolence, now of ridicule. I am glad 
this thing has assumed such proportions. It had to come before 
it could go. Peace is cheap at any price, and we are paying that 
price. This strike is the death knell of unionism. 

As lo Funston's "unwhiimod mob," if the coat (its the 

working man. let him wear it. When any one speaks of the 
disturbing element or "the riotous part id' our community," the 
union man says: "That means me" — and it does. He is a spoilt 
child. Everybody must unselfishly and enthusiastically kow- 
tow to him. If his whim suggests walking, we must walk or 
get our heads broken. That a man who works with his brains 
instead of bis hands may have some compunction as to the 
peripatetic course, never enters the unionist head. There is a 
sanctity about labor abnormally susceptible to blasphemy. 
Wealth and intelligence must grovel before stupidity it it lie 
hallowed by poverty, improvidence and manual labor. The 

Examine!' is making the must of tbi' Kunston incident, of course. 
We are waiting for tiie anarchistic benediction from Petei C. 
Yorkc From the first, that tex( book of indecorum; from thi 

second, dux miiiiiii malorum, good Lord deliver us! 

That clerical misfit, Yorko. i- again attempting 

the hoodlum element to violence. Life al e, and it i- 

noi surprising lo see the educated hoodlum appealing b 
ignorant member of bis class. Ili~ laie, i ,ii, hum i- to thi 

thai the street ears have no right of v a \ which tl 

to respect. The cbii|iieiil tirade concludes hv stating thai lb' 
unions are lighting the bailie- oi the L"mI. We were taught in 

our young days thai the Divine personality "moves in a mys- 
terious way his wonder- In perform," hut ibis is the first lime 
that we ever 'earned thai the thugs and in-ullers of women 

were enlisted in His cause, li is jusl such men as Yorkc who 
furnish England with the shadov ccuse for th< centuries 

of oppression and misrule which she has visited upon the 

end mountebank's native land. . 

General Punston maj have been criticized for his remark 

about ibe "unwkipped mob" in San Francisco, but he « 
ineK right. Neither be nor his soldiers care about being 
ued before a hoodlum element which would not hesitate 
suit them as representatives of the law. General Fun-ion has 
proven himself a patriotic, gallant American soldier, and when 

he speaks, bluntly though ii may In 1 , he speaks the truth. 

a pity that tin army cannot have an opportunity to whin the 

cowardly ruffians who insult and in drove- attack single ,' 

less men. The highest tribute that can he paid to General Fun- 

ston is to announce that the labor union pack is yelping 

lis tine and sound stateui 

Still they come — or rather go — these union labor 
-. Tbe In.- uniot i-urer to decamp funds 

of his union i- I". Y. Schuman. 

Union, win with ■ his organi 

Schuman, howpver, w m a-' 

h little di 
to mat " Tber, - 

highly-developed arm 
ite ; vide S 3 ion treasn 



How many think? Ninety per cent of the people never 

gel beyond inherited instinct. The ignorant man cannot disso- 
ciate his rights from bis desires. Envy is the inseparable ally 
"I improvidence, and when 1 hear one man abusing another 
who has not injured him, 1 know nothing is complimenting 
something; failure is noticinp success. The trouble with most 
people is, wdiat is known in mechanics as "lost motion." I refer 
to the eternal desire lo berate those who are beyond the reach of 
slander. You can't drill into the average head that one who is 
satisfied with himself is impervious to the shafts of abuse. I 
have heard all my life of the heartlessness of the rich. Wfe arc 
Inning a taste of the benevolence of the poor. Human nature is 
alike, and what is a rich man but a poor man with money? a 
poor man 'but a rich man without? 

For once ibe thinking people of San Francisco have for- 
gotten politics in their fight for decency. Who imagined a year 
ago that Schmitz would be in jail? But he is there Xow. who 
doubts that unionism is on its last legs? I believe that Mr. 
Cornelius is going to follow Mr. Schmitz. A union man asked 
me: "Why do you uphold capital's course — you arc poor?" 
"Y T es," I replied, "in money, as poor as you. Bui in respecta- 
bility I am a Yanderb'lt : in love of law a Croesus; two phases 
of wealth to which vou can never attain." By (he way, whence 
can come the money to satisfy ibis insane demand for such high 
wages? Once a book-keeper struck for higher wages, and sued 
bis employer for fraud because be compromised by giving him 
an interest in the business. The application is not far oil'. 

Wlien the public comes lo realize the immense service 

Cornelius has rendered io ii. no doubl the sentiment will be to 
pension him for life for being a public benefactor. Perhaps 

there may be others, but only be of all bis fellow labor leaders 
knew exactly bow lo not only smash bis own Carmens' Union 

into smithereens, bul discredit labor unionism generally. Thanks, 

old man ; you made a good job of it. 

A young heiress of Iowa went to Xcw York to join the 

ultra wing of ibe -in. hi sei. bui wa- snubbed when n was discov- 
ered that b a' entire fortune amounted to onl] $10,000,000. Then, 
again, she was pure-minded, - and refused midnight sup- 

pers, which was agues! her. Blessed are lb,' poor. They wii! 

have their inning where a hing does not have to be 

worn lo keep from being melted. 

- L i- noticeable that more criminals arc being convicted 

in oar courts than tie: e ci in tipl i nioii 

Labor administration. Juries tew find men guilty with much 
greater frequency than of old. The reason ■ ! 

less jury living. Thi p jusl at present. - 1 

aie lei heir own uninfluenced judgmi 

The Sir. ol M ssouri now has a "Poultry Board." Ii 

was created by the I hire. The Missouri mule lias 

hitherto had things it- own way, but hereafter the ben will be 
iving rights thai even the mule must re-peel. 



lal&uiin 




TV Baldwin coaft Tow • Bid* 
(OertSrr with it, kniw>c darebuWy. 

D H BALD\l IN «, CO . 



for Act 

I W> V.o N, » Ar 



rCatfonu. 



10 



SAN FBANCISCO NEWS LETTEfi 



July 6, 1907. 



PLEASURED 
WAND 







tSon mcarr — 




and dancing team, who are well and favorably remembered, will 

contribute to the entertainment. It will be the last week of 

Lalla Selbini. 

* * * 

This coming week at the New Alcazar Theatre will inaugu- 
rate the summer season made famous by Messrs. Belasco .*"; 
Mayer, and serve to introduce to the patrons of the pretty thea- 
fcre Mr. Herbert Kelcey and Hiss Effie Shannon, for the first 
time engaged in local stock. The vehicle chosen by these artists 
for their opening performance is the four act society drama. 
"Her Lord and Master," a play in which these exquisite people 
have done with tremendous success in various portions of the 
East. It is a play in which the principals have great scope in 
which to prove their artistic worth, while the minor roles are of 

a very artisl ic character. 

» » * 

Ethel Barrympre is billed to appear at the Van Xess Theatre 
commencing nexl Monday night. July '8th, in "Captain Jinks."' 
tin- comedy by Clyde Fitch that is regarded as the greatest of 
her many triumphs, and the play that has at least held most 
favored distinction in her round of successes. It is in this 
piece, above all, in which she won her first stellar laurels, unex- 
pectedly so to her manager, Mr. Charles Frohman. who did not 
aim to feature her in the announcements at all, beyond leading 
her name in the east. But the genius of the young actress as- 
serted itself, and ensured her Lasting renown on the opening 
night of the original production a few seasons since. 



Ethel Ba/rrymore in "Captain Jinks" at the Van Ness Theatre. 

The Frawley season at the Novelty Theatre will come to a 
close with Sunday night's presentation of the very laug i il 
farce, "The Private Secretary," in the leading role of which II. 
G. Lonsdale has made a great hit. Few of the modern come- 
dies have better lines or situations than this play, and when it 
is given a bright and intelligent interpretation is one of the 
most pleasing of stage offerings. 

* * * 

The Orpheum bill for the week beginning this Sunday matinee 
is headed by Anita Bartling, a recent arrival from Europe, who 
brings with her the reputation of being a peerless and original 
juggler. Her performance created a sensation in every capital 
of Europe, and the big cities of the East are unanimous in 
praising her marvelous skill and dexterity. The Jack Wilson 
Company, which includes Ada Lane and Albert Green, will make 
their first appearance in this city. They have chosen for their 
introduction their most amusing skit, "An Upheaval in Dark- 
town." Bose and Jeanette, two strikingly handsome girls, whose 
eccentric and original dancing has created a furore wherever 
they have been seen, will he a delightful feature of the coming 
programme. Bert and Bertha Grant, a clever colored singing 



San Francisco is to lip congratulated on the outcom • if the 

Schmite reign, hut it will be many a long day before the city i- 
freed from the disgrace of his election in the first instance : or. 
in other words, for giving itself into the hands of labor unionism. 
Schmitz is simply organized labor personified. In all his official 
conduct he stood for the spirit, the principles and ethics of labor 
as an organized force. 




Lalla Selbini, the bathing beauty, at the Orpheum. 



July 6, 1907. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



11 




Rose inul Jeannette at fhe Orphev/tn next week. 

THE STREET GAR STRIKE. 
Indications, as the News Letter goes to press, are that the 
street car strike will he derlaml off, and nn unconditional sur- 
render will be made by the men oul on strike on next Tuesday 
oi Wednesday. From the ranks of the striker? the story comes 
thai Cornelius and Bowling are both to be shelved by the men, 
and that wholesale resignations are in order ns seen as thi 
men, who were forced by the younger element into this disas- 
trous period of idleness, return to work. Pat Calhoun's "Non- 
Union t'liion" will increase greatly in membership oexl week. 
The members of the union who are accusing I of all 

kinds of treason to the unior are oi the Bowling faction. They 
are lend in their denunciation of what they term his misman- 
agement On the other hand, ii seems to be impossible 
the voire which continually whispers rumors of financial difficul- 
ties in Bowling's office. Both these dilemmas would find easy 
solution i>\ excising the tumors causing all the trouble. 



.1 NEW DOCTOR. 
I'M- injection of S. S. McClure and Senator Newlands into 
local affairs as pari and parcel of the general scheme of Gov- 
ii. will ca : Kjople to sit up and take notice. The 

Galveston ii a is the News Letter idea, suggested some tint 

■ ns. and the idea is not a new 
one. hut the striking and significant fart connected with its 
ent promulgation is that Doctor Newlands has called Hvtor Mc- 
Clure in consultation, and that the srraft prosecution is now Hear- 
ing a second stage which will he shortly followed by the laying 
of all the cards on the table. Senator Newlands an 
have \ast ; ' and around San Francisco — and it is not 

strange that he takes such a keen interest in the eitv"s welfare. 



We have the distinction of being the only people on earth 

whose annual liquor, wine and beer hill is greater than any one 
of our ground products. Our corn crop of 3,000,000, 

for a little more than 50 cents a lvushel 
;. Bui )>'.-■ :hink of the fun an 
have out of it. 



Van Ness Theatre 

GOTT1.0B. MARX & CO.. Props, and Mgrs. 



CORNER VAN NESS AVE. 

AND GROVE STREET 



Beginning Moiidriy July 8, diaries Frolunan presents 

ETHEL BARRYMORE 

in the greatest of her successes, tho fantastic comedy, in throe 

CAPTAIN JINKS 

By Clyde Fitch. 



COR. SUTTER AND 
STEINER STS 



New Alcazar Theatre 

ABSOLUTELY "CLASS A" BUILDING. Tel. West 603k 

BELASCO & MAYER, Owners :\nd Managers. 
Commencing Monday, July Sth, seventeenth week of New Alca- 
zar Stock Company, presenting Mr. Herbert Kelcey and Miss 
Effie Shannon in 

HER LORD AND MASTER 

Prices: Evening, 25c to $1 .00; Mais., 25c lo 50c. 

To follow— THE MOTH AND THE FLAME. 



Orpheum 



ELLIS ST.. NEAR FILLMORE. 
Absolutely Class A 
Theatre Building 



Week beginning Sunday afternoon. July 7th Matinee every day 

PERFECT VAUDEVILLE 

Anita Bartling. tho famous European juggler ;Jack Wilaou Co,. Rose and JeiuieHo ;Bert and Horlh" 
Grant; Bernar. the Kinj; of Marionettes; Lalla Selbini; Armstrong and Clark; New Orpheum 
Pictures and last week and immense success of Virginia Earl and Co. in "A Mid nigh! Mistake " 

Prices — Evenings, 10c, 26c, 50c, 75c. Box seats, $1. 
Matinees (except Sundays aod holidays ), 10c, 25c, 50c 
Phone West 6000, 



Novelty Theatre 



CORNER OTARRELL 

AND STEINER STREETS 



Commencing with Matinee Sunday, June 
COMPANY in the celebrated comedy. 

THE PRIVATE SECRETARY 

Matinee Prices 25c and 50c. 
Evening prices, 25c. to ?1. 
Matinees Sunday, Fourth of July and Saturday. 



30th, the FRAWLEY 




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Potrcro Branch-. 19th and Minnesota. 



J> 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 6, 1907. 




;ANITE 



,.rffe=Ml.-.. 



Aptos station on the Pajaro-Santa Cruz line of the Southern 
Pacific will probably be the scene of the first battle between the 
Japanese and the Americans when the labor-union-agitated war 
breaks out. The Japs have erected there, on a commanding site, 
a block house with port holes and all those things so necessary 
to forts and fortresses. The men are employed by (he railroad 
company, and they used the company's spare ties' for the pur- 
pose. It's a wonder the yellow journals have not stumbled onto 
this important news. 

* * * 

Just at a season of the year when everything is supposed to 
be conducive to happiness and pleasure for visitors at Santa 
Cruz, the Union Traction Company has several hundred track- 
men and railroad builders at work laying broad gauge double 
tracks throughout the main business streets of the city. It ; s 
the hope of the business men and hotel people of the town that 
the new system will be ready for use at least by the close of the 
season. They can congratulate themselves, however, that the 
change is being made, for when it is finished, the Surf City will 
have the finest system of street railway north of Los Angeles. 

* * * 

The Jane L. Stanford inheritance tax recently paid into the 
Santa Clara County treasury, amounted io $142,404.85. The 
next largest sum paid in by any one estate was $70,374.00 for 
Samuel Davis. Santa Clara County is second on the list in the 
State, with a total receipt credited to inheritance of $150,- 
536.39, io San Francisco's $334,048.08. The inheritance tax 
pays 20.3 per cent of the entire county in Santa Clara County. 

* * * 

Mrs. May Cavallro. to save whose life 250 persons donated 
strips of skin some months ago, finally died last Monday in a 
San Jose hospital as the result of burns received in an explosion 
of gasoline. 

* • • 

More trouble for Mis. John Lee. of San Mateo; her club house 
in the splendid Hotel Mateo grounds burned Monday morning at 
a loss of $10,000. It was only four years ago that 'Hotel Mateo 
burned at a considerably greater loss. 

* » » 

Subscribers to the service of the Pacific States Telephone Com- 
pany at Santa Clara have been warned to cease "flirting" with 
the girls at "central." There has been much complaiql there as 
to the kind of service given by the company, and (he pink tea 
business carried on by and between pretty operators and the 
stablemen, bartenders, students, et al., has been found to be the 
fault. 

* * * 

Cupertino, a cross-roads settlement in Santa Clara County 

stands a chance of getting its name in the paper every now ! 

then since relatives of Graft-Fighter Francis J. Heney live there 
in fact, the correspondent of a San Jose paper has tumbled onto 
the racket, as is indicated by the following clipping- "Miss Grace 
Heney, our Cupertino society belle, went to San Francisco on 
\\ednesday to spend Sunday with her uncle and aunt, Mr and 
Mrs. Francis J. Heney. Mr. Heney is the noted graft lawyer. 

* * * 

Commuters' tickets sold at Burlingame in May 1906 
amounted to $1,0(10 in round numbers, according to the local 
newspaper, and in May, 1907, the total receipts for commutation 
tickets was $2,500 ; there were 95 ticket holders a year ago as 
against 275 for the same month this year. Burlingame will I.,. 
a city some of these days at that rate of increase— besides, look 
what the stork is doing there. 

* * * 

So realistic was the full-page half-tone of Sisson, the McCIoud 
country, and the region around Shasta in last week's issue of the 
News Letter that a wealthy young woman at Gilroy, on looking 
intently at the picture of the lake, fell into it and was soaked 
to the skin. 



It is whispered (hat the ticket sales at Palo Alto for May 
amounted to one thousand dollars per day, with three hundred 
dollars per day added for freight collections. And neither of 
llir interurban systems is as yet in operation. 

* * » 

Palo Alto people who declare their part of the country is not 
getting its rightful share of improvements on roads and else- 
where, are becoming serious over the matter of seceding from 
Santa Clara County and starting a county of their own. They 
propose including in the new division, which may lie called Stan- 
ford County, all the country lying between San Franciscquito 
Creek on the north and Sunnyvale on the south. Port Palo Alto 
and San Francisco bay on the east, and the earthquake fault 
line at the summit of the Santa Cruz range on the west. This 
will include Stanford University, whose inheritance tax pay- 
ments will practically be sufficient for all purposes tor which 
taxes are collected. The northern end of the county is sick and 
tired of what they declare io be an unjust domination by San 
Jose politicians, and if they can, will cut loos,, ami let the old 
bunch get along the best way it can. 

• * * 

If the Guggenheim smelter people at South San Francise.i 
will pip., its gas and smoke to the Farallon.s, or to a height of 

•-'1 miles toward heaven, the people of San Mateo, Burlingame 
Redwood City. Alameda. San Leandro, Elaywarde and Oakland 

will condescend to have the plant installed. 



11. A, I'eekham, who is one of the old timers with the Souther' 







Lea & Perrins' 
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THE ORIGINAL WORCESTERSHIRE 

For broiled chops, 
steaks, cutlets, etc., 
no seasoning is re- 
quired, save butter 

and Lea & Perrins' 

Sauce. Add to the 

gravy one or two 
tablespoonsful of 

Lea & Perrins' Sauce 

before pouring it 
over the meat. 

John Duncan's Sons, Agents, New York. 



J 



July 6, 1907. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



13 



Pacific Company, resigned the office of agent at San Mateo some 
months ago, and on June 30th Bevered his connection with 
the Wells-Eargo Express Company, for which he has been agent 
Tor many years, and will spend several years in traveling and 
looking after his mining interests in Southern Nevada. Mr. 
Peckham was the company's first agent at Santa Cruz, having 
learned "operating" at Pajaro, and having gone to Santa Cruz, 
when tin' road was first opened. That was some thirty years 
ago. 

* * * 

The Salvation Army has been holding an annual camp meet- 
ing at Beulah Park in the suburbs of East Oakland, and one 
of the new converts was a modest appearing young girl, who 
worked for a wealthy family in East Oakland in the neighbor- 
hood of "Borax" Smith's palatial home. This girl had ren- 
dered faithful service for a period of three years, and she little 
thought that by becoming a Salvationist she would lower her- 
self in the estimation of her employer, and was very much sur- 
prised when told that she could not remain in her position un- 
less she would cease to wear the army uniform, which, as a mem- 
ber of the organization, she refused to do. Now the question 
arises, what was there in the modest suit of blue and poke bon- 
net that should cause people supposed to possess intelligence to 
be so prejudiced? The army uniform is certainly entitled to 
as much respect as that of the Dunkards, Quakers or Sisters 
of Charity. The Salvation Army uniform stands for religion, 
temperance and charity in every form, and is recognized as such 
by all who are interested in the betterment of the world, and that 
a family should be willing to discharge a girl on account of be- 
ing a Salvation Army las? is past comprehension. 

* * * 

It is sometimes amusing to read the titles of some of the 
themes discussed by students who are ending up their career as 
high school students. In Oakland last week the programme at 
the commencement of the Oakland High School announced as 
two of the subjects to be expounded by sludcnts yet in their 
'teens, ''Secondary Education in the Dnited States and Ger- 
many" and "Utility or Development — Which?" \'e gods ami 
little fishes I What is the world coming to? 

» * » 

Those who were in Department 5 of the Superior Court of 

Oakland the elher day weie treated to a surprise. Acting Chief 

of Police Walter .1. Petersen was called to the witness stand, and 
when asked by the prosecuting attorney what his business was, 
modestly replied "police officer." The surprise was due to the 
tact that most people who have heard the various heads of the 

police department of Oakland testify have had In listen while 

the puffed-up officials pompously drawled out "Chief of Police 
of the City of Oakland." By the way, has ,im one heard of any 
desperate characters getting a«a\ since Petersen has been at the 
liehn? This hint mighl well he taken by the Police Comm 
era of Oakland. There are some instances, however, where a kick 
(out of office) would have a more telling effect. 

Superior Judge MeUm gave the young, inexperienced Depu 
District Attorneys of Alameda County a rebuke that the "hoy' 
lawyer will remember for many moons. The court was endeav- 
oring to fix ih ■ degree in a burglary case, when this young Dep- 
uty District Attorney, without having investigated, told Judge 

Melvin that he "thought it Was after Bun-down, and therefore 
was burglary of the first degree." 

"We'll continue this matter one day." sharply replied the 
judge. "In the meantime, make certain about this 

I'pon looking the matter up. it was found that the young 
lawyer had another "think coming." The burglary was one of 
the second decree. 



MILK THAT IS WHOLESOME. 
Since the scientific handling and preservation of milk, originated by 
Gail Borden in the early '60's. the use of Eagle Brand Condensed Milk 
has become general, but for those purposes where an unsweetened milk 
is preferred. Borden's Peerless Brand Evaporated Milk fills everv re- 
quirement. 



All kinds of interior repair work and furniture made to order s 

usual. UNITED CRAFTS AND ARTS. 147 Presidio avenue. 

British and Foreign Marine Insurance Co., Ltd. 

Of Liverpool. 

Capital $$.700,000 

BALFOUR, GUTHRIE A CO., Agents. 
41$ Jackson Street. San Franclseo 



Fireman's Fund 

INSURANCE COMPANY OF 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

$1,600,000 Assets, $5,772,374.28 

Sansome and California Sts., S. F. 



Connecticut Fire insurance Go. 

Of Hartford. Established 1850. 

Capital $1,000,000.00 

Total Assets ' 5,401.698.31 

Surplus to Policy-holders ; 1,922,306.24 

December 31, 1906. 
518 California St.. San Francisco. Gal. 

Benjamin J. Smith, Manager 

West Coast Life Insurance Company 

Principal Office, 1042 Ellis St., San Francisco 

Offers desirable General Agent's contracts, providing for first and 
renewal commissions. Territory in- Pacific Coast States. Capable and 
trustworthy men, desirous of building up a business of their own, are 
invited to call upon or write to the company". 



Cash Capital. $200,000. 



Cash Assets, $546,555.61 



Pacitic Coast Gasualty Co. 

of California. 

Employers' Liability, General Liability, Teams. Elevators, Workmen's 
Collective, Vessels, Burglary, Plate Glass Insurance. 

Officers — Edmund F. Green, President; John C. Coleman, Vice-Presi- 
dent; F. A. Zane. Secretary; Ant. Borel & Co., Treasurers; F. P. Deerlng, 
Counsel. 

Directors — A. Borel, H. E. Bothin, Edward L. Brayton, John C. Cole- 
man, F. P. Deeiing. E. F. Green. I. W. Hell man, Jr., George A. Pope. 
Henry Rosenfeld. Adolph A. Son, William S. Tevls. 

Head Office — Monadnock Building, San Francisco. Marshal A. Frank 
Company, General Agents for California, Kohl Building, San Francisco. 



Founded A. D. 1792. 

Insurance Go. ot North America 

Philadelphia, Penn. 

raid-up Capital $3,000,001 

Surplus to Policyholders 4. 042. 994 AS 

San Francisco Contlagratlon I^osses paid 3,260.000.3 

BAII.ET & JOHNSTON. Oeneral Agents. 

N.E. Corner Pine and Battery streets, San Francisco 



Continental Building and Loan Association 



Market and Church Street*, Sao Pranclaco, Cal. 

In Business for 18 Years 



CAPITAL SUBSCRIBED 
CAPITAL PAID IN AND RESERVE 



$15,000,000.00 
- 2.481,317.50 



A per cent, paid on ordnarv deposits 6 pet cent paid on term deposits- Interest paid o" de- 
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WMfclacton Dodea. lYsntdan* Jonah O. Crawford. ■- D . lad Tins Pranidant 

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Will.am CorWn. Sac'y and Os 



PACIFIC TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY 



Capital $500,000 



F. Q. Drum, President 



Murry F. Vandall. Manager 



TITLES EXAMINED AND INSURED 



420 Montgomery Street 

San Francisco - - California 



J 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 6, 1907. 




S£im 




The rehabilitation of .San Francisco has developed new inter- 
ests for society women. Chief among these is an absorbing de- 
light in house-building, and an understanding of architect 
plans, no matter how complicated the levels and elevations. Un- 
der ordinary conditions, a chance to revel in blue prints does 
not flow as freely as pink tea. The average woman gets an 
opportunity to build one or two houses in a life-time, and she 
"goes it alone." for only under such extraordinary conditions as 
exist at. present is community building interest passed around 
with the biscuits. Time was wdren women knew as much about 
the fenestration of a house as the average man knows about 
laying an inverted plait in a skirt. But now, at any gathering 
of women you will find at least a dozen eagerly discussing hou3e 
plans, and the technical knowledge they display drives the last 
nail into the slander that women cannot get a plan "into their 
heads." 

A number of fine residences that were not burned were so 
severely damaged that the rehabilitation practically amounts to 
re-building, and it will be interesting to see the changes their 
owners have wrought in them. Much more true than the charge 
that no woman chooses the same type of husband twice is the 
assertion that no woman would build a home exactly the same 
if she had it to do over again. "Trial homes" would be much 
more popular than "trial marriages.'' It is only after one his 
tried out a house by actually living in it that its advantages 
and defects may be honestly weighed, Pudolph Spreckels a 
so stoop-shouldered with all sorts of affairs that he has left the 
repairing of their beautiful town house entirely to his clever 
wife, and I am told that Mrs. Spreckels has greatly improved the 
place. The Spreckels are considering re-building on their Sobre 
la Vista estate, and also consider building at Burlingarne, so 
Mrs. Spreckels will have ample opportunity to exercise her tal- 
ents in that line. 

Mrs. Walter Martin has a great many clever ideas about house 
building, and her friends always consult her when they an: 
planning a home. The Martins have established their house- 
holds goods in their new Burlingame residence, but they them- 
selves are rusticating in the Sierras. The Wilsons have joined 
the Martin camp, and every one is thoroughly enjoying the 
generous delights of outdoor life. Mrs. dim Follis is happilv 
settled in the new house which they have just built in San 
Rafael. An architect told me the other day that Mrs. Follis 
could grasp a plan on paper quicker than the average man. The 
Follis house is not pretentious, but it is admirably devised for 
the uses to which its owners intend to put it — not for elaborate 
entertaining, but it will accommodate a jolly big house party, a 
good deal of space being given up to bed rooms instead of super- 
fluous reception rooms. 

I am told that the Will Crocker?, or rather Mrs. Crocker, for 
her husband leaves the domestic arrangements entirely to her. 
has no definite idea of building a town house. Mrs. Crocker long 
ago outgrew the wooden palace on Nob Hill, which was built be- 
fore our esthetic taste was as highly developed as it is to-day. 
And of all the present day society women, nerhaps none has such 
a nicely-balanced sense of beauty and proportion as Mrs. 
Crocker. I was talking the other day with an artistic young 
woman who does decorating, and she said that Mrs. Crocker 
had a truer sense of arrangement than any society woman she 
had ever observed. The mere placing of a branch of fruit blos- 
soms in the wrong jardiniere will spoil the ''composition" of a 
whole room, but every woman does not know when she has thus 
daubed the picture. When .Mrs. Crocker does build, her friends 
expect to see a house that will have true artistic worth. 

The marriage of Miss Grace Adel and Dr. William Raymond 
Linscott was solemnized al eight o'clock Wednesday evening of 
this week. The bride'- 3velfe beautgs was graced by a magni- 
ficent wedding gown. The church was beautifully decoraled, 
the aisles were diversified by arches of asparagus ferns and white 
sweet peas. The altar was consistently decorated with the luxu- 
rious green of huckleberry and clusters of enchantress roses. 



Clarence T. TJrmy, the well known poet and musician, was the 
musical director for this occasion, the choir making an impres- 
sive appearance in full vestments. The choir announced the 
coming of the wedding party with the beautiful hymn, "0 Per- 
fect Love !" 

On Tuesday evening, Miss Elizabeth Sheehan became the 
bride of Bernardo Shorb. Many hundred guests witnessed the 
ceremony in St. Mary's Cathedral, which was beautifully deco- 
rated in a color scheme of pink and white. A large reception 
followed at the Fairmont Hotel. 

Arrivals at Witter Springs — San Francisco: A. Sinia, Mrs. 
M. J. Laymance, Miss Laymance, Leslie Rice, Miss Blanche 
Laymance, Miss ilazel Laymance, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Robb, A. 

E. Findley, II. H. Taylor, M. B. Charles, Mr. and Mrs. Brownell, 
Mrs. Hecht, Miss Clark. J. K. Hecht, G. II. Taubles, B. A. and 
Mis. Tracey. Mm. Reidel, F. B. Southworth and wife, Miss 
tficols, James W. Towne, Mr. and Mrs. Albert Fair, Miss Tag- 
gart, William Humphrey, Miss E. Ellison, Edwin T. Mullen, 
Mrs. E. E. Ellis, James Speirs, 11. B. Rector, Miss Bates, Mr. 
and Mrs. George Campbell, George A. Stoddard, Roy Hutchins. 
Oakland — Mm. Goldwaithe and wife, Mrs. A. G. Basheim, Doug- 
lass Talbot, Senator George C. Perkins, Miss Pansy Perkins, Mrs. 
Ross Ekhardt, Otis M. Foe. A. Ewing. Petaluma — Mr. and 
Mrs. J. W. Horn, Aionzo X. Penn, Mr. and Mrs. H. H. Hunt- 
ington, M. F. Hunt, Colonel and Mrs. J. P. Gallagher. Palo 
Alto — Mr. and Mrs. Dr. Howard Black, Mr. and Mrs. J. A. 
Durkee, Mr. and Mrs. L. A. Fuller. 

The third monthly California "Get-together" dinner was held 
last week at the Cafe Delcnne, an old French hotel on Sixteenth 
street, New York. About forty Californians sat down together 
and exchanged reminiscences. It was decided that the matter of 
future meetings be left with the manager of the Eastern Bureau 
of the California Promotion Committee with the suggestion that 
picnics would be better than dinners during the months of July, 
August and September. It is probable that these will be ar- 
ranged. The following were present: Mr. and Mrs. W. II. 
Christy, Mr. and Mrs. William T. Martin, Mr. and Mrs. Edward 

F. Hill, Mr. and Mrs. Richard Burr, Mr. and Mrs. Colvin B. 
Brown, Elmer De Pue, R. G. Wevh, Jr., Ray B. Howell, Albert 
W. Ball. R. W. Ritchie, X. II. McGilvary, I. Percy Mills, Dr. and 
Mrs. Woolsey, Colonel H. 1. Kowalskv. Mi.s Futie Pattee, Mrs. 
J. R. Cornell, Miss Margaret Kenny, Miss Mary Kirk, Miss Isa- 
bel Kirk, Mrs. F. B. Arvine, Mrs. Howell Miner, Miss McRey- 
nolds, Mrs. A. P. Condon, Miss Lucy Post, Miss Lou Helmuth. 
Miss Isabel F razor, Miss Waterman. 

.Mrs. Horace P. Brown, of Alameda, who has just returned 
from a trip to the Yosemite Valley, in comparing withetaos 
from a trip to the Yosemite Valley, in company with Mr. and 
Mrs. Harry Bishop and Mr. and .Mrs. \\ . IF McKinnon, left 
Tuesday for a month's outing at Monte Rio. She was accom- 
panied by her charming young daughters, Dolores, Hazel and 
Winifred, and son Clendenin. 



POST AND LEAVENWORTH 

Becomes famous, since it is the location of the Little Palace 
Hotel. The grill is the great drawing card as it was in the old 
days. 



Baume Betulae, the greatest relief for Rheumatism. Neuralgia, Sciat- 
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THE STAR HAIR REMEDY, the best tonic; restores color to gray 
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Autos For Hire 



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SERVICE AT ALL HOORS 



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Phone Park 325 



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Select Summer Crui»o. Firit clau only. SEND (of handsome illuttrated Pamphleti 

BAMBURG- AMERICAN LINE 

998 M.riei Street 



Sao Franciico, Gal. 



July 6, 1907. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



15 



LOUIS GLASS. 

Never has there been a man connected with the business en- 
terprises of San Francisco so thoroughly well-known, so much 
of a gentleman ; so generous and magnanimous as Louis Glass. 
The confidence, trust and belief in Glass felt by all men who have 
ever come in contact with him during the many years that he 
has been in San Francisco, is not limited to his club associates 
or his familiars. 

This esteem, unconsciously tendered, extends from the men 
who labor in the trenches, on the streets, the line men and the 
entire office force of the telephone company that he has labored 
so long to make the best of its kind in the world. Patient and 
hard working always, there has never been a time in his career 
when he has not had a kind or encouraging word for the deserv- 
ing or a piece of friendly advice for the earnest worker, strug- 
gling to advance. 

The supposition that Louis Glass has, for even an instant, in 
all his years of quasi-public employ, countenanced or connived at 
crime of any kind, is simply untenable. 

The public at large, those of the people who have at no time 
been thrown by business or otherwise, into contact with Louis 
Glass, have their own ideas of the animus that has culminated in 
the indictments of the officials of the Telephone Company. 

The conspiracy which first charges the officers with crime and 
then incites a strike, in order to further cripple the company 
and depreciate its securities, is not simply hinted at, but broadly 
charged as a fact by people who are well acquainted with the 
prosecution, but who have no personal knowledge whatever of 
Louis Glass's character and standing among his fellowmen. 

The prosecution is much discredited in men's minds because 
of the firm belief that somewhere there lurks an ulterior motive, 
somewhere will be found ultimate financial gain for the prose- 
cutors. 



POOL ROOMS AT SAUSALITO. 

The News Letter may once again claim that it has gained a 
victory in the name of law, order and decency. The people of 
Sausalito, who are decent enough to realize the evil done their 
city by the criminal clement that has so long prevailed as tha 
dominant factor in the local Government, are jubilant over the 
action taken by District Attorney Boyd. Again and again this 
journal has called attention to the conditions existing in the 
beautiful little suburb, ami at last action has been taken. 

The gamblers and their dupes claim that nearly all the real 
improvements, such as streets and other betterments, have been 
brought to their present perfection by the use of the license 
money exacted as a toll from those engaged in unlawful pur- 
suits, 'this may be true, but the fact that an entire community 
is beholden to criminals and to criminal practices lor any or 
all of its prosperity, is no reason why the practices should con- 
tinue or the criminal be longer tolerated. 

h is n.u believed that the gambling element is of any benefit 
to any communitv ai any lone, ami it is undeniably true tint 

Sausalito has deliberately driven many would-be residents away, 
has lowered rental ami real estate values, by pandering to the 
vicious elemenl through its civic officers. It is not sufficient 
that the ov. these dens he arrested. They should be haled 

before the Grand Jury, am! it should he the stern duty of that 
body oi investigate matters, to the end that the means taken to 

secure ga ling privileges he ascertained and the officials party 

to Hi,' granting of such privilege and protection be punished. 

District Attorney Boyd is doing good work, and he di - 
the plaudits of all Marin County. 



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lishing from week to week a series of splendid photographs that 
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IMPORTERS OF WORKS OF ART 



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The Lambert Snyder Health Vibrato 

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Circulation, Locomo'or lln» Arnaa < r Pi 
too* P*btlily. Ininilul Dintders. Ito <ir»i». so 
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■AH H. AOHBW, Agent 

2037 S.n Jn.o A»e.. Alameda 




I RBSTLIENT CITY. 

San Francisco is a resilient city. It makes little or no differ- 
ence what combinations are made by labor unions to strangle 
all industry ; it makes no difference how many attempts are made 
to throttle capita energy and courage, San Francisco 

rises from the blows administered with renewed deter- 
mination. The statements -mole this w iek b] the banks and by 
the assessor are an 'vidence of the fact that this city ear. 

ack in its development. It always has horn and always 
will Ik 1 the - of the Ps 9 > •. the mosl 

remune all for i 1 lent of foreign and local 

_ It stands 

re and sti n the surface of which 

jed a war of pigmy insects. Th or has been pub- 



IN ALAMEDA 
For Sale or to Lease 

8 Room Cottage, Furnished or Unfurnished: 
Pretty Garden. 

2251 Clinton Ave 

Between Oak and Walnut. Open for inspection 
between 10 a. m. and 1 p. m. Or for informa- 
tion address F. A. Marriott, 773 Market St.,S.F. 



•THE POT CALLED THE KETTLE BLACK." 
BECAUSE THE HOUSEWIFE DIDN'T USE 

SAPOLIO 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 6, 1907. 




FINANCIAL 




The following local banks paid semi-annual 
Banks. Disburse dividends on July 1st: The Bank of San 
Dividends. Francisco at the rain of 4 per cent per 

annum on all savings deposits; Bank of 
Italy of San Francisco, at the rale of 3 8-10 per cent per an- 
num on all savings deposits, Eree of taxes: Mission Savings 
Bank, at the rate of I per cent per annum on all savin.::- di pos- 
its, free of taxes; Savings and Loan Society, at the rate of .'t :; , 
per cent per annum on all savings deposits, and the Mutual 
Savings Bank, at the rate of 3% per cent per annum on all de- 
posits, free of taxes; California Safe Deposit and Trusl Com- 
pany, at the rale of 4 pel- cent per annum on all deposits, Free of 
taxes; .Metropolis Trust and Savings Bank, at the rate of 3.65 
per cent per annum on all savings deposits, free of taxes : Ameri- 
can National Bank of San Francisco at the rate of 3 per cent 
per annum. The previous semi-annual dividends have been 2 1 /) 
per cent. The sum of $511.1100 was also carried to the reserve 
fund. Hibernia Savings and Loan Society at the rale of '■'•'■'■ \ per 
cent per annum on all deposits: Market Street Hank, a! I 1 ral 
of 4 per cent per annum on term deposits and M 1 - per cenl on 
ordinary deposits; Swiss-American Bank of San Francisco at 
the rate of i per eon per annum on term deposits and 3.60 per 
cent on ordinary di posits; German Savings and Loan Society al 
the rate of 3.80 per cent per annum on ail savings deposits free 
of taxes. The Wells-Fargo Nevada National Bank of San Fran- 
cisco paid a half-yearly dividend to stockholders on duly 3d at 
the rate of 8 per cent per annum. 

It is satisfactory to note that E. YV. 
Emmons Will Pay Emmons, the mining swindler who 
the Penalty. robbed a poor widow out of $500 bj sell- 
ing her stock in a worthless mine, called 
the Drummer Boy. in Trinity County, has received the extreme 
penalty of the law — six years in the State's prison. This should 
he a lesson to others engaged in this class of business that the 
day is gone past when crimes of this class can lie committed with 
immunity- in the State of California, where for years it was 
one of the moit difficult things in the world to secure a convic- 
tion in a ease of the kind. Convict Emmons will probably re- 
gard himself in the light of a martyr, while recalling the names 
of men now basking in the sunlight of prosperity as Fortune's 
favorites, who are equally as guilty as himself, if not more 30, 
He got caught, however, and al :i period when the robber) of 
willows and orphans is not looked upon as a line art. and when 
public sentiment dor- qoI favor the accumulation of wealth io 
such rascally methods. It will he hoped that when released, his 
course of life will have been changed lot- the better, and that his 
experience will have taught him that dishonesty is something 
that does not pay in the long run. 

The chances an- g I tor the appoint- 
on 01 of W. C. Ralston to the posit ion 
of United stales Assistant Treasurer 
al the local sub-treasury to sueeeeif 
I [e has hem strongly endors d by 
Senators Perkins and Flint of California to President h'oo-e- 
velt. at the suggestion of the leading bankers of this city, and 

there is every reason to believe that Buch a recot m itio 

will be followed by acquiescence upon the part of the Chief Ex- 
ecutive. Then/ is 110 man in the State more competent lo (ill 
the position and do honor to the appointment, which, in this 
ease, will he accepted by the great mass of citizens as the due 
recognition of merit. Mr. Ralston lias been a State Senator 
lor four years, ami has also filled many other prominenl public 
offices in lie most able manner. Hi- .-election for the sub- 
treasury appointment is certain to meet with Dopular annroval. 
The action of the governors of the 
Brokers' Commissions San Francisco Stock ami Exchange 
are Still too Loir. Board in raising the commissions 
from one-half to one per cent, has 
been approved at a meeting of the members by a vote of about 
three to one. The same meeting also settled the question of 
sustaining or turning down the Board of Governors. The Gov- 
ernors will remain. In the matter of variation, the big Board 



Would be a Popular 
Appointment. 

the late Julius Jacobs. 



will adjourn from to-day until July 8th. The other Board of 
thi' San Francisco Mining Exchange has voted to close for the 
holidays from July 3d to July Nth. a few days shorter vacation 
than their brethren across the street. Ln the mailer of commis- 
sions, the rate of one per cent will generally he considered 
low enough by people who understand the inside running of the 

stock broking business, and the many temptat s which offer 

for the broker to "make good" al the expense of a client. A fair 
rat.' of commissions would he at leasl double the new rate. It 
would work for honesty in the business, which is an expensive 
one to run as it should lie. and brokers who have to pass long 
and arduous hours in and out of the Board are entitled to a liv- 
ing. A commission of one per cent is not an extravagant rate 
by any moan-. 

A British financial contemporary, which 
/ Uimate Fate of has grown rich and correspondingly 
Miiiiin/ Promoters, haughty on the profits of company nota- 
tions, published recently, inadvertently, 
possibly, the following account of a "general meeting of stock- 
holder-" on settling day: "A c pany promoter died. He did 

not go to Heaven. When lie got to the other place, Bhe general 

manager met him, shook him by the hand, and said: 'I am sorry 
to -or you coming here, Mi-. Beringer, because I like you per- 
sonally, and cannot candidly recommend these llais — the) arc 
seriously over-heated. But 1 will send round on.- of my imps to 
-how vou tie' cooler spot,-.' After perambulating lor Bome time. 

they came to a hall where a large number of | pie were seated, 

all looking eool and comfortable. 'Why are they not all scorch- 
ing like the others?' asked the company promoter. 'Oh/ replied 

the guide. '4 hose ate your shareholder: they are loo green < 

hum I'" At ihis, a cloven-footed, fork-tailed attendant shivered 
like an aspen with suppressed laughter, as he escorted the new- 
comer to a lift and swiftly descended with his charge amid smoke 
and flame which shot up fierce and unquenchable from the .sul- 
phurous depths below. 

The brokers of the San Fran- 
l.oi nl Stork I'J.rrhrin</rs. eisco Stock ami Mining Exchange 

are enjoying 1 well-earned holi- 
day this week, and should be in good fettle when they take up 
business duties again mi Monday next. The members of too 
other exchange continued in harness until Wednesday last. an. I 

kept up a record of quotations during the recess of the older 

exchange. for all the business done at this season of 1 1n 
the) might as well have enjoyed a longer holiday. 

The financial statement of the Hiber- 

llihrniiu Statement, ni.i Savings and Loan Society for the 
term ended June 30, 1907, makes a 
strong showing as usual for this prosperous and popular insti- 
tution. Its total assets aggregate $58,776,496.71, including 
$12,088,372.7'! in [Jnited States bonds, and $9,653,936.34 in 
miscellaneous bonds of a gilt-edged description. The loan- of 
this haul., aggregate some $33,483,309.03, with cash on hand 

amounting to $1,893,309.03. The actual vali f the reserve 

fund is placed at $3,653,083:56. 

The San Francisco Savings 1 nion, 

S. /*'. Savings Union a sterling banking concern of this 
Financial Report. city, publishes to-day its ninetieth 
semi-annual statement of its financial condition al (he close of 
business on June '."'in last. The total assets are quoted al 
$32,090,444.46. In this are included a list of loans aggregat- 
ing $16,951,257.33, and bonds valued at $11,383,167.39. The 

cash mi hand amounts In $2,729,005.34. The reserve fund is 

reported at $1,139,332.06. 



SPENCERIAN 



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SPENCERIAN PEN CO., 349 Broadway New York. 



Jolt 6, 1907. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



17 



STATEMENT 

of the Condition and Value of the Assets and Liabilities 

OF 

The Hibernia Savings and Loan Society 

(A CORPORATION) 

and where said assets are situated 
DATED JUNE 30, 1907. 



ASSETS 

1 — Bonds of the United States, the actual value of which 
is $12,088,372.74 

The Condi tl< r said bonds is as follows: They belong to 

said corporation, and are kepi and held by it in its own vaults 
and are there situated. They arc "Resist* ret] ! per rent or 
1925 (?8,986,000.0G) United States bonds and District of Colum- 
bia (¥475,000.00) 3.6S per cent Bonds" guaranteed by the 
United States i Government — and are payable only to the or- 
der of said corporation, 

2 — Miscellaneous Bonds, the actual value of which Is 9,663,936.34 

The c litlon of said bonds is as follows: They belong 

to said corporation and are kepi and held by it In its own 

v.i nits and are I here situated. 

They are: 

"Southern Pacific Railroad ( ' pans of Califor- 
nia 6 per cent bonds" $ 655.000.00 

■■San Francisco and North Pacific Railway Com- 
pany E per i h tn bonds" 475.000.00 

"Los Angeles Pacific Railroad Company of Cali- 
fornia Refunding 6 per cent bonds" 100, 

"LiOs Angeles Railway Companj of California •"> 
per cent bonds" 334.ooo.oo 

"San i-'tiii. \e\ o and San Joaquin Valley Railway 
Companj 5 per cenl ' is" 3i6.ooo.oo 

"s hem i '■" : .i" i Irs nch Ball? i npany of 

Calil la 6 pei cenl bonds" 246,000.00 

"Northern i !allfo ■ ompany 6 

relit bOndS" 

"Northern Railway Compan; -rnla 6 per 
cent bonds" 2!t.ooo. oo 

"Mai k«1 Stree ■ Railway Companj ,; ■ 

inn bonds" ui55. ooo.oo 

"Marl ■ Consoli- 
dated ft i per i ent i da" 763, .00 

"The Omnibus Cable Company *» per 

" I-;:. 

"Powell Street Railway Compan; E pei 
bonds" 

"Sutter Street Kaihv a\ < Vn>pai,\ 5 ■ per iont 

bonds" i:.i»..nio.oo 

"Presidio and Ferries Railroad Company 6 per 
cent bonds" l i.ooo.oo 

"Ferries and t"Hn* House Railway Company 6 
per cent bonds" 

"City and County of San Francisco .; l-l per 
cent bonds" 

"California State i tenol I ] Bonds' 86O.0 0.90 

"County of Ban Mateo Courthouse * per «*nt 
bonds 60,000 

"Sequoia Union -High School District -i pei 
bonds, San Mateo 

"Union High School Dtsti 
County 4 per cent bonds" 

"The Merchants > ptr con! bonds" i .* 

■ 
per cant bonds" 



3 — Cash in United States Gold and Silver Coin, belonging to 
mI corporation, and In Its possession, and situated at its said 
office, actual value 1,893,961 64 

4— Promissory Notes and the debts thereby secured, the ac- 
tual value of which is 88.483,309.08 

The condition of aald Pt Issory Notes and debts is as fol- 
lows: Thes are all existing contracts, owned bj said corpora- 
tion, and b re payabli to ; l al Its office which is situated at the 
corner of Market, McAllister and Jones streets. In the City and 
County of San Fran i Isco, State of California, and the payment 
i iereol is secured by Firsl Mortgages on Heal Estate within 
this State. Said i ron Issor] Not* uid held bs 

>t!i .-. which is Its pri b of 

business, and said notes ami debts are there situated. 

5 — Promissory Notes and the debts thereby secured, the 
actual value of which Is 701 

The condition of said Promissory Notes and debts is aa fol- 
i . ont racts, owned by said corpora- 
tion, and are pa] r Its office, which is situ 
aforesaid, and th< »l is secured by pledge and 

railroad and qua* irpora- 

■ i ■ nit las. 

6 — Interest on Miscellaneous Bonds accrued to July 1, 1907 1 

7 (a) Real Estate situated In the City and I 

[870,463.14), and In the counties of Ban! 
, ;3.0 and San M i 72) 

in this Stat., the actual value ->f which is 140.897.69 

(b) The Land and Building In which said keeps 

office, the &> tual rafue <>( which is 609 

The condition or sai'l rami aetata is that it belongs t-> Bald 
corporation, ami part "f it is productive 

658.776.496.71 

LIABILITIES 

1 — Said Corporation owes Deposits amounting to and the ac- 
tual value or which li . (66.1S4.41S.16 

The 
only oul n.i are fully secured lh< 

2 — Reserve Fund. Actual Value 

Total UtblllUi - U8.776.496.71 



THE HIBERNIA SAVINGS AND I.".N - 

By JAMBS R KKI.H 
TUB H1HERNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

BTATE OP CALIFORNIA. 

3 

JAMBS R KELLY end R 

- 
THE HII 

statement Is true. 

JAMES R KEL1 

B. M 

:l>e,l and «-»r.>m • this 1st 'I 

In and for I 



18 



SAN PEANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 6, 1907. 




Mr. Darwin P. Kingsley, whose election to the presidency of 
the New York Life Insurance Company was referred to in last 
week's News Letter, is standing in the full glare of the spot 
light. The policy-holders of the company in this and other 
countries will watch his career with the closest scrutiny. In the 
election which took place last December, the ticket on which 
Mr. Kingsley's name was carried, won by a majority of one 
hundred and thirty-eight thousand votes. Mr. Kingsley was 
formerly vice-president of the company. He is a Vermonter by 
birth, and is fifty years of age. He has served the company for 
a great many years in various capacities from agent up to hie 
present position. He is a son-in-law of the former president, 
John A. McCall, and was elected in the recent campaign on 
what was known as the administration ticket. He has made sunn' 
strong representations as to the future policy of the company. So 
strong are his promises that they amount almost to a challenge. 
He invites criticism, and assures himself of plenty of watching, 
both by his own insured, and hy his competitors. In taking his 
office he said in his address, "the law must be observed in spirit 
as well as in letter," and further : "Amongst the problems that 
face this board in its conduct of the company's affairs, I see 
nothing more menacing just now than the tendency to pass un- 
reasonable legislation with regard to life insurance in the vari- 
ous States of the Union. These bills largely relate to taxation, 
and involve a constantly increasing drain upon the premiums 
paid by the policy-holders. The result is not only a very heavy 
and unjust burden upon the thrifty, but, as the tax varies in 
different States, the injustice is not evenly distributed." 

The following of the law, and the conduct of the company, 
make an undertaking which is gigantic in its ramifications, and 
will call for all the ability and all the integrity of the new 
president or any other man. If Mr. Kingsley can live up anv- 
wbere near his aspirations, and half way to his professions, his 
name will go down into history as a leader among leading in- 
surance men.. He has a fair chance; his board of directors is 
with him, the company has passed through a strenuous period, 
and he assumes power, without any disturbing element, or any 
power to hinder or mar his management and plans. "I'eraiuus." 

* * » 

The local agent of Eastern Washington recently made a pil- 
grimage to Seattle, to confer with the powers there regarding 
grain insurance in their section of the country. They claim 
that under the existing rule, the business is being lost to the 
companies they represent, and is being written in the local mn- 
tuals. The companies are reported to agree as to the necessity 
of some action, and do not intend' to allow this business, which 
is usually very profitable, to be taken off their books without a 
struggle. Threats of opening up rates are made by some of the 
heaviest losers. This action would precipitate a nastv fight, 
which it is feared might not be confined to the grain business. 

* * * 

Ex-Manager Mullins, of the Commercial Union, has been 
heard of from Japan. Be is reported as being in first class 
health and eager for San Francisco news. 

* * * 

Macdonald & Miles, general agents of the Westchester, have 
secured offices in the new building being erected on the sir,, r 
the old Russ House. They front on the Bush street side, and 
are to be finished in accordance with the designs of the firm 
both as to decorations and arrangement of offices. 
» » * 

The talk about the organization of mutual fire insurance com- 
panies apparently does not culminate. It may be that the dear 
public is too scary just now to be caught by any gold-brick 
scheme which the fluent promoter is trying to spring" Recent 
experience has driven home to the minds of the public the fact 
that insurance which insures and pays losses, when the lime 
comes must have capita! reserve and ability behind it. The dis- 
trust of the "assure-one-another-plan," with notes as capital, is 
not a catchy proposition to the man who has settled his claims 



against insurance companies for fifty cents on the dollar, within 
the past vear. He is lookine for the best just now, and the best 
is none too good. The price rules high, but the demand cannot 
be supplied. 

* * * 

The Christensen & Goodwin Agency is now established at 
235 to 211 Sansome street, where they will eventually occupy 
the whole basement. These sumptuous offices will be finished 
in mahogany, and when finished, will be very handsome quarters. 
Christensen & Goodwin arc managers for Amercian Central In- 
surance Company., St. Paul F. & M. Insurance Co., Mercantile 
F. & M. Insurance Co.. Lloyd's Plate Glass Insurance I lo. 

* * * 

The Supreme Court of Georgia sustained in the case of Rylan- 
der vs. Allen, the right of a person to procure insurance on his 
own life and to assign the policy to another who has no insurable 
interest in the life insured. 

* * * 

The Supreme Court of Minnesota held, in the case of Taylor 
vs. Grand Lodge of the Ancient Order of United Workmen of 
Minnesota, that declarations and admissions of a person since 
deceased, made ante liiam motam respecting the date of his 
birth, were admissible in evidence ngainsi hi- 1 ■■■?!■■ (ii-i;i i-v in an 



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San Francisco find Oakland 
CALIFORNIA 



July 6, 1907. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



19 



action to recover upon a mutual benefit certificate issued to him 
in his lifetime, in which action the defense interposed was that 
a false due of birth was given in the application for membership, 
the basis for the insurance, and that in such an action a prior 
application for life insurance in another company made under 
circumstances of a nature to vouch for the truthfulness of the. 
statements and representations therein contained, in which the 
dale nt birth was different from that given in the application in- 
volved in the action, was competent evidence as tending to es- 
tablish the true date. The court further held that it would take 
judicial notice of the uniform and generally known custom of 
life-insurance companies to require as a condition precedent 
to the issuance of an insurance policy a properly signed and exe- 
cuted application therefor, together with an authenticated medi- 
cal examination of the applicant. 



The Recorder is to be complimented on its late anniver- 
sary number — a creditable production and one that should 
be of great value as a reference to mining operators and mining 
men generally. The stories told of the olden time, especially that 
of the palmy days of the "old board," by Joseph L. King, one 
of its original members, and for many years its chairman, are 
of more than ordinary interest. Herman Zadig, another of the 
old-time brokers, who is one of the best-posted men in the Board 
on the Comstoek, and the mines of Nevada generally, has also 
a special article in the issue, which will doubtless be highly ap- 
preciated by people on the street who are now giving much at- 
tention to the subject. 






The Hotel Rafael and cottages are the scene of many 

merry parties these days. Automobilists have discovered two 
things — one is. that the Marin County roads are in fine condi- 
tion, and the other that mine host Orpin of the Rafael knows 
how to set a fine table and that his menus are appreciated after 
a brisk drive over the road. The Hotel Rafael is the week-end 
rest spot for the business man. There is n<> other hole] in Cali- 
fornia so favored as to climate, accessibility or location. 



The Spaulding Carpet Cleaning Works at 925 Golden 

Gate avenue is the place the good house-wife has in mind as -in 
eves the carpet thai needs cleaning. Promptness and thorough- 
ness are the characteristics of this firm. 



On last Wednesday the Sultan Baths were formalli 

opened to the public, as previously announced in the News Let- 
ter. From basemen! to top Floor, there are seven in all. these 
modern baths were visited by throngs who pronounced them 
the most perfect in the world. The Sultan Baths are nowhere 
excelled in splendid equipment and thoroughness in service. 

Tho\ are an added claim to metropolilanism by San Francisco. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The Continental Building and Loan Association. 

The Continental Building Olid loan Association. Market and Church 

streets, San Francisco, Cal. ( has dei the six months ending 

June 30, 1907, a dividend of four per cenl pi on ordinary deposits 

and six per cenl en term deposits. Interest on deposits payable on and 

July 1st. Interest en ordinary deposits net railed for will be 

ad m the principal and Hi t the same rate. 

WASHINGTON DODGE. President. 
WILLIAM CORBIN. Secretary. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco, 
the half year ending Jui a dividend has been declared 

at tin- i:ib- of Hie ' S-4) per cenl per annum on 

1 after Monday. July 1. 1907. 
led to and bear the same rate of interest 
principal from July 1. 1907, _ , , 

OBORQE A STORY. Cashier. 
Office Street, opposite Third. San Francisco. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
San Francisco Savings Union. 
For the half year endln " a dividend has i 

at the rates per annum ol foui (41 pei "'* three 

r cent on or free of tax. 

and after Monday. July 1. i 
their dividends at anj Time .luriiiK the succeeding half year. Pii 
not drawn will be added lo i part thereof 

1 * ,nl >" l fl t. ... ..~~ -. ..■ 

i.i'YKI.I. WHITE. Cashier. 

ia and Me streets. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
The Savings and Loan Society. 
The Savings and tend for the term 

ending June -f three and three-quarters (3 3-41 

i: on all do, on and 

t called for are added to and 
kta of interest as principal. 

EDWIN BONN ELL. Cashier. 
Office — 101 Montgomery street. Comer Sutter. San Fra: 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Humboldt Savings Bank. 
For the half year ending June 30, 1307, a dividend on all savings de- 
posits has been declared at the rate of three and eight-tenths (3 8-10) 
pel nnt per annum, free of taxes, payable on and after MONDAY, July 
I, 1907. Dividends not called lor are added to and bear the same rate 
of interest as the principal from July 1, 1907. 

„_ W. E. PALMER. Cashier. 

Office — 646 Market street. San Francisco. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Central Trust Company of California. 

For the half year ending June 30, 1907, a dividend has been declared on 
deposits in the savings department of this bank as follows: On term de- 
posits at the rate of four (41 per cent per annum, and on ordinary de- 
posits at the rate of three and three-quarters (3 3-4) per cent per annum, 
payable on and after Monday. July 1, 1907. Dividends not called for are 
added to and bear the same rate ol interest as the principal from July 
1, 1907. B. G. TOGNAZZI, Manager. 

Office — 42 Montgomery street, corner Sutter, San Francisco. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
The German Savings and Loan Society. 
For the half year ending June 30, 1907, a dividend has been declared at 
the rate of three and eight-tenths (3 8-10) per cent per annum on all de- 
posits, free of taxes, payable on and after Monday, July 1, 1907. Dividends 
not called tor are added to and bear the same rate of interest as the prin- 
cipal from July 1, 1907. GEO. TOURNY, Secretary. 
Office — 526 California Street, San Francisco. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
The Hibernia Savings and Loan Society. 

At a meeting of the board of directors of this society, held this day, a 
dividend has been declared at the rate of three and three-quarters 
13 3-4) per cent per annum on all deposits for the six months ending 
June 30, 1907, free from all taxes, and payable on July 1, 1907. Dividends 
not drawn will be added to the deposit account, become a part thereof, 
and earn dividend from July 1st. R. M. TOBIN. Secretary. 

i iffice — Cor. Market, McAllister and Jones Sts., San Francisco. 

San Francisco, June 27, 1907. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
The Scandinavian Savings Bank, Chronicle Building, Market street. 
For the half year ending June 30. 1907, a dividend has been declared 
at the rate of 4 per cent per annum on term deposits and 3 3-4 per cent 
per annum on ordinary deposits free of taxes, payable on and after Mon- 
day, July 1st, 1907. 

L. M. MacDONALD, Cashier. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

California Safe Deposit and Trust Company. 

For the six months ending June 80, 1907, a dividend has been declared 

on all deposits in the savings department of this company at the rate 

ol four (4) per cent per annum, free of taxes, ami payable on and after 

A lay, July 1. 1907, The same rate of interest will be paid by our 

branch offices located at 1531 Devisadero street, 2572 Mission street, 1740 
Fillmore street, and 19th ami Minnesota streets. Dividends no! drawn 
will be added to Mm- deposit account, become e pari thereof, and earn 

dividend from Julj 1. 1907. .1. DALZELL BROWN. Mgr. 

Office— Corner C ornla ami Montgomery Francisco, 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
The Italian-American Bank. 
The ituh. m-.\m. -i. sig Montgomery streel corner Commercial, 

Glared b dividend fo a ending June 80, l'.'"7 ui the rule of 

I oi per < ■ hi per annum on all saving 

'MAY. July l. 1907. Dividends not cs 

ui . mid,. 1 1 t. i Da | < 

A SBARBORO. President, a. E. SBAJtBORO, Cashier. 

• rclal. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Security Savings Bank. 
For the half year ending June 29, 1906. dividends upon all deposits at 
te of four (4) per cent per annum, free of taxes, will be payable 
after July 1, 1907. 
,_ ... FRED W. RAY. Secretary. 

Office — 316 Montgomery street. San Francisco. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Market Street Bank. 
The M t Bank. Seventh and Market streets, for the six 

period ending June 80, ired invirtends on the de- 

posits in the Savings Department us follows: posits at the 

rate of 4 per on pei annum, and on ordinary deposits at the rate of 
3 1-2 per cent per annum, free of taxes, payable on and after Tuesday, 
,^„ ' WEN. Cashier. 

Office — Seventh and Market streets. San Francisco. 

DIVIDEND NOT ICE. 
The Renters' Loan and Tri,st Company. 
The Renters' Loan and Trust Company of San Frun.tsco. Commercial 
Deposit Vaults, Nos. 131-135 Haves street, east 
of Van N .... Kor the half year ending June 15. 1907. a dividend 

has be. ^ at the rate of four Hi : • annum on 

deposits on and after Monday. June 17 

d.-nds not called for are added to and bear the same rate of Interest as 
the principal from June 15. 

i cent per annum paid on commercial deposits, sub- 
heck, credited monthly. Interest paid from the day that all de- 
posits are made. 
C. S. SCOTT. Vice-President and Cashier. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Crown Point Gold and Silver Mining Company, 
location of principal pla, e of bus *,-o. Cal. Location 

of works — Go: 

>f Directors, 
held on tl>. : 

- 
of the romp. 
Montgomery -rnla. 

Any sto.k upon which this as»e> remain unpaid on the 

24TH PAY 
w-ill be delinquent, and advertised t> and unless 

1-ayment is n the 14th day 

er with the 
,-ost of advertising and sale. 

By order of the Board of 

^_ _ C. ' Secretary. 

Office — Room 916. Kohl Building. N. E. corner California and Mont- 
gomery streets. San Francisco. California. 



20 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 6, 1907. 




LOOKER ON 



J»llWiJl,«Ul.LV.^-l"H'.''.llL 



■ir.VA, 




I may be wrong, but I have always contended that San Fran- 
risen needs advertising. Not that, we should advertise what we 
are doing — thai is sufficiently exploited — but what nature has 
done. Easter i people know nothing of our city, save that she is 
tbe conservatory of municipal thievery, the laboratory of strikes. 
If she wei\' known, she would be a perfect Mecca to wealthy and 
retired Easterners. As to investments, I am no financier, but 
I know, if I know anything, that real estate is going to beeome 
practically priceless, flow many really disagreeable days have 
you seen in San Francisco? ever see a mosquito? a finer harbor? 
more fruit? any natural gift you can conceive of that she lacks? 
To conclude, did you ever meet a man on good terms with our 

police, who wanted to go back East? 

* * • 

Do you know that, while young people at sea are phenomenally 
susceptible to the tender passion, sea-sickness cures love? Say 
what you please, the seat of love is the liver. There is a link 
between sentiment and biliousness/ I was at sea once with a man 
who was lovesick and seasick at the same time. Sighs and reteh- 
ings each monopolized his energy, and strove for the mastery; 
His sighs sounded like the sucking of one of tbe ship's bilge 
pumps. At last nausea conquered. Of course; it did. It always 
does. Half the "prickings of conscience" can be cured by stimu- 
lating the liver. A good renovating of the biliary organs does 
more to ease remorse than a thousand vows of amendment. Who 
ever believed in total depravity whose stomach was satisfied? 
"In tbe good old times," every healthy boy was predestined to 
eternal punishment. Every community had its tallow-faced 
pattern, who consented to pose as a model. This milk and 
water standard went out with the old-fashioned Sunday school 

story books. 

* * * 

When stern reality asserts itself, how quickly sentiment evapo- 
rates. Perhaps the most pronounced proof of this is the un- 
dertaker. I have made this gentleman my specialty. Recently 
I told a hilarious young undertaker that 1 thought he should 
dress in black and look sad. He said he did not aspire to be 
confounded with tbe corpse. Then he apologized for the lack 
of chairs and asked me to be seated "on that coffin and try some 
of these sandwiches and beer." Gentle reader, would you credit 
it? There was a corpse in that coffin. He sat complacently 
no it. and ate with appetite. "Good Heavens." I thought, "how 
use doth breed a habit in a man." After all, is not sentiment, 
like conscience, solely the fruit of education and distance? 
for ibis reason, marriage while not necessarily killing love, un- 
questionably assassinates sentiment. Sentiment is the pleasing 
haze id' falehood that half clothes naked and unfamiliar truth. 

* * * 

Wj. K. Hearst, tbe trust buster, is alleged to be engineering a 
(rust of his own in Chicago for tbe ion-pose id' raising lb'' price 
<>f the Sunday editions in thai city to seven cents a copy. 

» * » 

Poor old Crothers! He i= in a pretty mess. Here is the Ex- 
aminer having lots of fun with General Funston, abusing him 
with all the venom that it can muster, and'because the Bulletin 
hates the Examiner it must perforce take the other side and 
half "stand in" with Funston, while the "unwhipped mob" rage 
at the desertion of their old-time ally, and old Crothers sees 
with horror-stricken eves the loss of at least two nickels. Is it 
any wonder, then, that Harry Orchard's compatriot issued or.Vn 
that no man in the reporter's room should ride on a strei . 
car, and furthermore, in order to try and "break even." hi' told 
bis little nephew to cut tbe pay of the reporters one-ball' during 
the existence of the striki ? 

Thi' reporters said they would leave in a body, and with tears 
and between drinks, Crothers inveighed against the ingral il tide 
of reporters. One of them, with sonic humor, said if Crothers 
would cut his number of drinks be ivould relinquish one-hall' of 
bis salary. 

If ever there was truth told in San Francisco it was told when 
Funston spoke of the "unwhipped mob." What has kept this 



mob quiet? It was through fear that Funston would have to in- 
tervene. It is Funston they fear. And our good friends of the 
city have to thank the reputation Funston has acquired of being 
thorough in what he does that has kept this mob in order. 

The Examiner in one column declared the city to be free of 
a violent and vicious element, and in the adjoining column bad 
a lying account of a murderous battle between the police and 
the strikers. There was a howl through the city that it would 
barm San Francisco if tbe city had been placed under martial 
law. It is to be believed, then, that attacks on cars, sporadic 
as they may be, is benefiting the city. We have reason to con- 
gratulate the city on possessing at least one officer who has the 
courage of his opinions, and that is Captain Colby. Now if this 
Grand Jury has a spark of honesty in its composition, it would 
see to it that Colby's zeal does not lack of result. It is in its 
hands to compel the respect of law. This body has done enough 
harm to tbe city by the reckless way it has returned indictments; 
let it now redeem itself and do some reparation for the mischief 
it has done. There is no need for asking the assistance of those 
olliciiius meddlers, Langdon or Spreckels. Let it be understood 
that it has the good of tbe city at heart, and that it will under- 
take to punish all offenders against the peace of the city, and 
we shall have peace, 'this car strike has too long been in exist- 
ence. 

• * • 

The California street line only began to run last week. The 
city is in need of transportation, and as Calhoun has shown a 
desire t" aid the city, it is tbe duty of the city to aid Calhoun. 

What it wants is industrial peace, and in order to still further 
stir up strife, ill-will, strikes, bloody murder and riots, the Ex- 
aminer starts this campaign against General Funston. 

• * * 

Can we not truly cry out: "Oh, Lord! how long! how long!" 
is the American nation to be bullied and badgered by these un- 
whipped, uueleansed and foul foreigners. If a man dn ed 

from Mars learned in his geography, what country would he 
think he had fallen upon? What with our hideous Tvcitmoes, . 
these vile Furuseths, that murder-hinting Cornelius, that fright- 
ful P. H. McCarthy, and that bleary-eyed, spirit-breathing 
Crothers! Would nut this stranger from Mars exclaim: "Oh, 
take me away from this land of villainy, from these assassins of 

men and characters. For it is not a land of men, but of ghouls." 

• • « 

Ex-Governor Qeorge C. Pardee expressed himself in rather 
strong language at the commencement exercises of the Oakland 
High School as being against political grafters. The night- 
mare of the Santa Cruz convention still rankles in the ex-Chief 
Executive's heart, so much so that be never bears the mention 
of the name of Eugene Sehmitz that be does not remember thai 
the grafting, convicted Mayor of San Francisco was among those 
present when tbe Pardee lemon was handed out. 



Murine Eye Remedy, a Family Favorite. Soothes Eye 

Pain. Makes Weak Eyes Strung. An Eye Food. 

Baume Betutae. the greatest relief for Rheumatism. Neuralgia. Sciat- 
ica; 50 cents at druggists. 




k 



The newest in belts— silk 
lined pliable leather with 
pearl buckle— in shades of 
gray and black. Also large 
assortment of other styles. 



Bullock & Jones 

Company 
Van Ness at. Eddy 



July 6, 1907. AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



21 



San Francisco Savings Union 

Northwest Corner California and Montgomery Streets 
SWORN STATEMENT 

of the condition and value of 

ASSETS AND LIABILITIES 

at close of business 

June 29, 1907 



ASSETS 

Loans on real estate secured by first lien 
on properties wholly within the State of 
California ' $16,951,357.33 

Loans secured In pledge and hypothecation 
of Bonds and Stocks of Railroad and 
Quasi-Public Corporations 521,396.16 

Bonds of Railroad, Quasi-Public and indus- 
trial corporations and of tha school dis- 
tricts and municipalities of ihc Slate of 
California 11,383,167.39 

Bank Premises 200.1 .00 

Other Real Estate in the State of Califor- 
nia 303,6X8.24 

Furniture and Fixtures 2,000.00 

Cash (in v.iull and La hank) 8,729,005.34 

Total taste 132,090,444.46 



LIABILITIES 

Capital Paid-up % 1,000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent Fund- 1,189,332.06 

Due Depositor 89,815 

General \'.w Account, Balance undisbnrs 133,573.46 

Total Liabilities $32,090,444.16 

San Francis,... ,T u lv 1. I 

9igned) E. B. POND, President 
aed) LOVELL WHITE, I 

■ of Califo 
City and County nf San Francisco. --. 

F. B. Pond and Lovell White, being y and 

duly sworn, each for himself, says thai said E. B. Pond 
is president and said 1. fell White is .nshier of th - 
Francis S - Union, the corpora; men- 

tioned, and that the fori - merit is true. 

- gned) F. B. POND. 

I) LOVELL WHITE. 

S scribed and sworn to 
1907. 

d) PRANK L OWEN, 

P n and for the City and Coon 

Fran. - S 



22 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 6, 1907. 




MOBILE 



J^L 



The Napa County authorities are standing right in the middle 
of the highway, waiting for the unlucky automobilist who may 
be fool enough to venture that way. These people, who pi end 
to bar the way of progress with rifles, are on a par with those 
who, in the old days, objected to the sewing machine and labor- 
saving machinery on the plea thai soon there would be no iaboi 
left to perform. Napa County is not the only county in the 
State of California that is opposed to good roads and modern 
means of transportation. 

The old fossils who are playing into the hands of the stag 
drivers took their cue from the action of the bunch of idioi^ 
who control Yosemite Park. Because two or three of their 
friends, who own the lumbering and uncomfortable coaches 
that carry passengers from the railroad termini into the valley 
beautiful, found that the automobile was fast depriving them 
of a source of income, action was taken which finally resulted 
in cutting the automobile out of the park altogether. 

Wlhilc it is wounding to self-pride to find oneself barred from 
a privilege which should be as free to any American citizrii as 
the air he breathes, it is, as a matter of fact, no deprivation of 
pleasure to be forbidden the fearful roads provided by the 
Yosemite Commission. From some of those who have recently 
returned from the valley, it is gleaned that there are a number 
of places on these highways that are almost as impassable as 
Golden Gate avenue, or some section? of Market street. 

As for the Napa County authorities, they are the sufferers, and 
eliminating the automobile means much loss to the county. One 
enthusiastic dealer told me that he and several of his. friends 
had decided to cut out all wines from Napa County, and in fact, 
to boycott all products coming from that county, and that he 
was informing all agencies to that effect. Napa County will 
learn some day, and will become sufficiently civilized not to shy 
at the sight of an automobile. 

The races at Del Monte are the feature of the week. Many 
records have been broken. The high-power runabout is "king 
for a day." The events of the glorious Fourth at Del Monte 
will now figure as trade promoters, and be used as argument 
clinchers by the voluble gentlemen who extol the merits of the 
modern business buggy. 

The plan to build a boulevard to Mount Diablo from Ygnacio 
Valley has been received most enthusiastically. The scheme is 
in the hands of the energetic young men who are last making 
a metropolis of Oakland. 

The Real Estate Exchange of Oakland, the Chamber of Com- 
merce and the Automobile Club are all strong supporters of the 
scheme. San Francisco should not onlv lend its moral support 
to the scheme, but the Automobile Club and the Dealers' Asso- 
ciation should devise ways and means to facilitate the rapid 
construction of this modern highway. On last Sunday the Board 
of Supervisors of Alameda County, members of the Oakland 
Chamber of Commerce and representatives of civic bodies from 
Oakland, Alameda, San Francisco and Haywards gather.. I al 
Pine Canyon, near Mount Diablo, and heard the proposal of 
the Supervisors of Contra Costa County for the erection of a 
monster boulevard from a point in the Ygnacio Valley County 
road, on the north line of Alameda County, to the sumnni of 
Mount Diablo. They were asked their support for the move. 

The gathering was one of the most notable meetings of pro- 
moters of this side of the bay, and iook the form of a barbecue 
and automobile tour, though the real object of the trip was a 
question into the support of the Alameda County promoters ' ii 
the move. 

The Supervisors of Contra Costa County are highly interested 
in their scheme, and hold the highest hopes that~the move will 
meet, with the support of the residents of both counties. Their 
plan is for the erection of a first-class highway, suitable for au- 
tomobiling and intended to be one of the most popular drives 
on this side of the bay. The promoters of the neighboring 
county will pay the cost of construction of the boulevard north 
of the county line, while the promoters of Alameda County have 
been asked to work for the erection of the boulevard from the 



WITHOUT A PEER AT THE PRICE 




APPRECIATION AND ENTHUSIASM 

grows greater every day as the season advances, for this 
new Cadillac, the first ant] only car ;it its price, proving a 
formidable rival ol cars soiling at from 50 to 100 per cent, 
higher. The price of the Model G is made possible only 
by the unsurpassed facilities ami <.quipment of the largest 
factory in the world devoted exclusively 
to tin- production of high-grade 
motor car.-?. Its guarantee 
is tin' Name. 




folks ; 
family 

ning; 
speed 



Great hill 
climbing power — plenty 
of speed. Sprightly enough In 
design to satisfy the whims of the young 
wild the good form that commends it to fashionable 
use. Ring type engine governor; smooth, quiet run- 
sliding gear transmission; shaft driv- direct on high 
lightness in weight secures utmost tire economy. 



Let your nearest dealer give you a demonstration. 
[bed in Catalog GAB 

Model H — 30 h. p., 4 Cylinder Touring Car, Catalog H A E 
Model M — 10 h. p., 4 Passenger Car, Catalog MAE 
Model K — 10 h. p., Runabout, Catalog MAE 
Send for catalog of ear that interests you. 

CADILLAC MOTOR CAR COMPANY, Detroit., Mich. 

Member A. L. A. M. 

For sale by Cuyler Lee, 359 Golden Gate avenue, San 
Francisco, and Lee Motor Car Co., 1032 South Main St., 
Los Angeles. 



county lino into Oakland. All the civic bodies of Oakland will 

unite in the plan of pushing ihrrmgh the scheme. 

The building of such a highway will ensure the Improvement ' 

of all other roads in the .idjaeent coun;i> b. 

* * * 

J. D. HoiT. president of the Pacific Coal. Clay and oil Co.. 
travels almost every week in his White steamer between Oakland 
and the company's properties in Mlpnterey. Mr. Hull' writes: 





For Sale 

1907 
PACKARD 


> 


Used 


only 3 months. Address H. F. Dutton, 
1730 Jackson St., San Francisco 



GEO. P. MOORE CO., Inc. 

AUTOMOBILE SPECIALTIES 



Headquarters for Imported Novelties, Domestic Necessities and 
Local Courtesy comhined with Fair Dealing. 



Branch — 1005 South Main St., Los Angeles. 
Branch— 231-233 Twelfth St., Oakland. 



721 Golden Gate Avenue, San Francisco 



July 6, 1907. 



ANTD CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



83 



"Made a very successful trip last week to our coal mine in Mon- 
terey County, going by San Jose to Gilroy, Hollister, Tres Pinos. 
Paicines, Muliberry. through Pear Valley, I'.il Ici'water, and 
up Lewis Creole to Priest Valley. To go to Los Angeles, keep 
on to Lonoak, up Peach Tree Valley, Slack's Canyon and down 
Indian Valley to San "Miguel, where you strike the railroad 
again. This saves going over the San Juan Hill, and is much 
shorter. The road is in fine condition. From San Benito to 
San Miguel there are no supplies on the road. This distance is 
seventy-four miles, over good roads. There is a good eating place 
at Lonoak. half way. If von telephone ahead, the road will he 
clear, and they will have supplies ;'l Lonoak. We came from 
Priest Valley to Oakland, 165 miles, in S hours and 40 minutes : 
running time. My son, Mills Hoff, fourteen years old, ran the 
car all the way without any mishaps.'"' 

* * » 

Motorists who contemplate a tour abroad, can obtain from the. 
Touring Board of the American Automobile Association, if they 
are members, all the information needed, down to the smallest 
detail of charges, for crating and carting, etc. On touring in 
this country it would be difficult to think of any question con- 
cerning routes, hotels, garages, road conditions, rates, etc., that 
cannot be answered. Inquiries about touring or membership 
should be addressed to Secretary F. H. Elliott, 437 Fifth avenue. 
New York. 

* * * 

Next to the tire problem, no question of motor ear economics 
now looms more importantly than that of cooling systems. Air 
cooling is excellent, but has its limitations. For water cooling 
systems in which a pump is used, there is room for some im- 
provement removing the objection that often the pump runs 
slowest when the engine needs the most cooling. The thermo- 
syphon system, of which the Renault is the great exponent in 
Europe, and the Maxwell the sole one in this country, has the 
supreme advantage of having the circulation of water increased 
in direct ratio with the increasing engine temperature. The 




LEGITIMATELY HIGH PRICED 

DEMONSTRATION BY APPOINTMENT 

LOZIER AUTO AGENCY, 

132 Valencia St.. San Francisco 




signal success of the Maxwell as a standard for medium priced 
cars has done much to advance the thermo-syphon system in the 
favor of American engineers, and its wider adoption now seems 
certain. 






*TJ 53ve^ 1907 



""Che&estjlutomobile" 

9 




Price $4500 FOB Cleveland. 5 P« 

The Steam* flenbih'ry of motor ii the greatest of any car. Besides being a moat powerful cat. the Steams is one of the most 
durable machines built. 

STEARNS can are designs! by engineer, built by mechanics,* tested by eiperts and consequently operated with satof tehee 
by their users. We invite your careful mvestigatioa and comparison, confident that we will profit thereby. 

THESE ARE FACTS TBAT WE WANT TO DEMONSTRATE TO IOC 
Ph.nc Franklin 1008 

California-Nevada Automobile Company, 368 Golden Gate Avenue 

SAN FRANCISCO 



The independence Day run to Del 
Monte will go down in history as one uf 
the most enjoyable among the California 
tats. The roads on both sides of 
the hay from Oakland and San Francisco 
to Salinas ami San dose was like a pro- 
n of exhibition 

* * * 

Miss Sabin is driving a 9tevens-Dur- 
yea. Miss Sabin is the daughter of the 
late John I. Sabin of the Telephone Com- 
pany. 

* * * 

C. P.. Shaver of Fresno is I lie happy 
-sor of a new White steamer. He 
will make i trip to Lake County 

-t the merits of his new machine. 

* * * 

Herman Efelbtuh, of San Francisco, re- 
turned last Monday from a tour through 
Lake County in his White steam car. He 
was .' I by his wife and child- 

ren and Miss Berry. Lea iv on 

Thursday morning, they went by way of 
San Rafael, Petaluma. - Rosa, 

i II .-'in- 1 Spring-), 
and on to Lakeport ft 
the b - ral up there, and a 

• sur- 
] !ng country and 8 i and 

- the cele- 
bration. Helbush found 

otion 
of th and 

• - 

not of thp 
- sind. Th Pieta 

and Highland S 

surface, making of real 

nent. 



24 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 6, 1907. 



Among those participating in the 
gvmkhana games, either as onlookers or 
as competitors at Del Monte, were the 
following well known people: P. K. 
Ainsworth, P. Kirkham Blair, George P. 
Cameron, E. P. Connelly, N. R. Cooper, 
W. B. Cogan, J. tl. Dieekman, Jr., A. M. 
Dollar. G. it. Freeman, 0. H. Greene- 

wald, E. M. Greenway. J. Underw 1 

Hall, William H. Hanson, M. A. Harris, 
P. L. Hansen. George H. Hooke, Will 
Jacks, 0. C. Joslyn, J. R. Konetsky, II. 
M. Landsbergerj Cuyler Lee. Julius A. 
Landsberger, AI. J. Lavmanee. William 
T. Lemman, S. H. Meyer, John P>. Met- 
calf, C. A. Meussdorffer, C. F. Michaels, 
H. D. McCoy, S. L. Naphtaly. W. 15. 
Palmer. J. M. Patrick, George B. Polhe- 
mus, AI. L. Requa, R. E. Revalk, George 
Boos, Sylvian Scnnaittacher, R. P. 
Sehwerin, Prank J. Sehwabaeher, Geo. 

D. Sharlbourne, R. AI. Smith, Louis Sloss, 
Leon Sloss, Adolph Phi. R. Zelinsky, A. 
AI. Ewing and Dr. Ford. 

The concourse was one of the great 
sights of the day, and the variety of cos- 
tume': worn made it a most picturesque 
scene. There was an intense interest dis- 
played in all the events, and a friendly 
rivalry in applauding favorite cars. 

In the California Woman's Automobile 
Club run to San Jose on the 29th of last 
month, there were represented Stearns, 
Rambler, Reo. Peerless, White, Maxwell 
and Lambert ears. Five members joined 
during the run — two in San Jose. Among 
those present were Mesdames Charles 
Gibson, Frank Ames, Harry Gray, ( '. S. 
Middleton, IT. S. Midcfleton, A. & 
lvre'os, Dr. J. H. Healey, Robert Chris- 
tie, J. Claude Perry,, I'Hommedieu, 
Bracken, Frank Fageol, Dr. Arendt, Dr. 

E. R. Field, Harvey Marvin, Joseph 
Etienne, Frederick Linz. and ATiss Helen 
Gray. Luncheon was served at the Ven- 
dome, and members were afterward 
given carte blanche to attend the matinee, 
attests of Aliss Izetta Jewel, or spend the 

time as they most desired. 

* * * 

Mr. Howard Davis, of East Auburn, 

drove his model A olds bile to Ibis city 

■ hi Saturday last, and in company with 
a party of friends, will leave fur Santa 
Cruz within a few days, where he will 
remain for two weeks touring around ; n 
his machine. 

The 70 horse-power Thomas Speedway 
••Flyers" ordered by Alessrs. P. J. Walker 
and E. J. Freeman, arrived hero last Sat- 
urday and were delivered to their pur- 
chasi rs. Air. Walker tested hi- oar by 
touring around the bay on Sunday, while 
Air. Freeman shipped his machine to Ne- 
vada, where he will use il driving to and 
from the various mining camps. 

Airs. A. E. Vohlander, of this city, and 
AIi'. L. G. Siller, of Sacramento, last week 
purchased a 60 horse-power Thomas 
"Flyer" from the Pioneer Automobile 
Company. 

* * * 

('. McDonald, of Oakland, is another 
White enthusiast. He will go all the way 

to Seattle in his White steamer. 

* * * 

Elliott Evans, of the Thomas Com- 
pany, was in town last week. 



Power 



Simplicity" 
1907 



Durability 



BUICK 



Touring cars 22-28 H. P. with full equipment 

$1400 

Runabout 22-28 H. P. with full equipment 

$1250 

Guaranteed speed 45 mfles per hour 

Cars in stock for immediate delivery. 30 cars now en- 
route. Call, phone or write for demonstration. 
HOWARD AUTO CO. 

Phone Franklin 2034 404-406 Golden Gate Ave. 



IRV1N SILVERBERG 



CHAS. S. MITCHELL 



THE IRVIN MACHINE WORKS 

Best Automobile Repair Shop West of Chicago 
General Machine Work and Gear Catting 

Our automobile repair department Is equipped with the finest up-to-date 
machinery. The unusual size and consequent steady work enables us to 
employ specialists Instead of expecting our mechanics to be Jack-of-all 
trades. Moreover, we can furnish in advance to owners exact estimates 
on cost of any repairs they may contemplate. 

Phone Market 2366. 335-337 Golden Gate Ave. San Francisco 




E Sales Room, Garage and Repair Shop 

CARMICHAEL BRAY & CO. 

The "Geotlem&n'i" Garage of S. F. 

370-372 Golden G.le Ave. 

PROMPT DELIVERIES ON ELMORE CARS 



jm 


z!k Runabout 


^^ 


4 CYLINDER 




16-18 HORSEPOWER 




90-INCH WHEELBASE 




30x3 1-2 INCH TIRES. 




PRICE $1150 


OSEN & HUNTER AUTO COMPANY 


107 Golden Gate Avenue. 


Phone Market 2723. 




USE MAYERLE'S EYEWATER 



before exposing your oyos to strong wind, dust, light or sun. 11 in a perfectly hanuless and effec- 
tive preparation. Oiiiiriintccd under tho U, S. Drugs Act, June 30th. 'OH, Serial No. 7;i7». Mr. 
Chris. Crow, care of w. W. Montague k Co., Pipe Shop, says: "1 have been trembled with m] ojni 
for a number of years. I tried a bottle of your Eyewater and find it is the bout Eyewater I ever 
used, and would not be without it in the house." Highly rocoui mended for weak eyes, poor 
sight, "ore eyes, cloudiness of vision, floating spots, pain about tho oyos, behind the head or In 
temples, watery or discharging eyes, fooling like sand in the eye*, burning, smarting. Itching, 
scratching, twitching gluey eyes, hoavy eyelids and olhor eye troubles. Persons biting tli.ir sen- 
sitive eyes exposed to tho strong light, du»t, wind or sun can git initanl relief by tiling Mayi'rto'«. 

Eyewater. BEWARE OF INJURIOUS IMITATIONS Tnko no substitute. Price f s mi.ll, S9o; 

i er one down tattles. 85 00. Mayerle's Antiseptic Eyeglass W iron., to lie used whru gl| 
tire or strain the eyes, 2 for 2-",c. No glasses loave (Jeorgo Maycrle's Optical Iimtituto union ab- 
solutely correct AddrossBHconiinuniiwilii.il!. to Oeorge Mayorle, llsl'Uoldoii Qmtt A> ■ ■ S,,n 

Francisco, nonr Webster. Phono West 37(10. Onl thin out. 



July 6, 1907. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



25 



h Notes. 

OseD & Hunter's big garage in San Jose was destroyed by fire 

a week ago last Thursday, involving ;i loss of over $50, 

This enterprising and energetic firm will immediately rebuild 
on :i much larger scale on the same site. New stock is bene.: n - 
ceived and architects are busy on the plans for the new building, 
which will be rushed to completion. The new garage will be 
fireproof. Only four of the 15 machines which were burned in 
the lire belonged to the firm. On some of the others there was 
insurance. Thirty care were taken out of the building before 
the flames reached them. 

* * * 

Walter White, driving a stripped 30 horsepower White steam 
car, was the hero of the postponed hill climbing contest held at 
Stucky hill, Dear Cleveland, on Saturday last, 15th inst. On 
this occasion, the "gasoleners" made no protest against the 
steamers, and White covered himself with glory by not only mak- 
ing the fastest time of the day 47 2-5 seconds, but also winning 
the two big events, the free-for-all and the class for ears weigh- 
ing between 1,132 and 2,20-t pounds. Stucky hill measures 
exactly seven-tenths of a mile, and has several bumps, but the 
Cleveland driver covered this in 47 2-5 seconds, or at the rate of 
a little more than 53 miles an hour, a remarkable performance 
indeed. In doing this, he triumphed over the much advertised 
Vanderhilt cup racer, the Darracq that won the cup contest in 
1905, and which he beat in the recent contest by more than three 
seconds. 

* * # 

The competition for devices which will prevent cars from 
being stolen is being orgatiized by the French Association Gen- 
erale Automobile. It is intended to develop apparatus calcu- 
lated at once to prevent tampering with cars left unattended on 
the street, and also the clandestine use of cars left in garages by 
their trusting owners. The scope of possible application of such 
devices is very wide, and it is expected that not a little ingenuity 
will be developed in connection with the event. 



PROPHET OF EVIL. 

It is reported and also contradicted thai .lames J, Hill, of the 
Qreal Northern Railroad, says: "The Government will ultimately 
be forced to lend ils credit to finance the needs of the railroads. 
The public, in its exasperation, will demand that the railroads 
shall lay certain rails ami add more cars. The railroad 

answer thai they cannot, that their credit has been ruined. The 
Governmeni will be obliged to step in and lend lis eredil to sup- 
ply i his deficiency. The situation might lead to Governmeni 
ownership of railroads. That would be the end of Republican 
Government." 

They s;i\ General Kuroki got so he could pronounce the 

word "How" in the best of English, but il is not understood that 

he publicly used the word in connection with the - 

"How could I land an army on these shores?" 



The Little Palace Hotel is now the center of attrs 

when luncheon and dinner is to be - 







428 


35 h. 
Golden 


RAINIER 

p. Make and Break with Simms-Bosch Magneto. 

The Pullman of Motor Car? 

Guaranteed free of repairs for one year. 

HAYES <& DAM, 
Gate Avenue. San Francisco 



Old Poodle Dog Restaurant 

824-826 Eddy St., near Van Ness Ave. Formerly at Bush St.. 
cor. Grant Avenue. Phone Franklin $3. 



1 90? PREMIER 



The Quality.^ 
C*r 

Touring Car and Touring 

Runabout, S2400. 24-28 H. 

P, 4-cylinder water cooled 
selective type, sliding gear 
transmission. 

E. P. SLOSSON, Agent 
Northern California 

COLDEN GATE GARAGE 
Fell and Ashbury Streets San Francisco Phone West 6885 




EnhBUICK 



HAN D 



FOR 
SALE 



A BUICK AUTOMOBILE RUNABOUT, 
with top and bumper, In excellent condi- 
tion. Price $900.00. The only reason for 
selling Is the owner desires to buy a 
BUICK TOURING CAR. Must be seen 
and "tried" to be appreciated. Address 
Advertiser, 773 Market street. 



SECOND HAND 
Automobiles 



BOUGHT, SOLD. EXCHANGED. Lamest stock In the West R. H. 

MORRIS, Auto Broker, 1818-20 Telegraph Are.. Oakland, Gal. Established 

1901. 



VULCANIZING 

Stevens &. Elkington Rubber Co. 

San Francisco, Cal. 



Phone Franklin 612 

524 Polk St. near Golden Gale Ave. 



Electric Lamps, Bells, and Telephones 

SUPPLIES DYNAMOS 

MOTORS REPAIRS 

CENTURY ELECTRIC CONSTRUCTION CO. 
18 Fell St.. near Market. San Francisco 





KEENAN 


BROS. 






Automobile Engineers, Machi 


lists and Blacksmiths. 




273 


Valencia street. San Francisco. 


Telephone Market 


1985. 



TIPS TO AUTOMOBILISTS 

14- MILE HOUSE! — "L'ncle Tom's Cabin" Automobile Supplies and re- 
pair shop. First -class accommodations. Cuisine unsurpassed on the 
Coast "Andy." formerly of the "Cliff House." 



PALO ALTO — Corbaley A Thorpe Auto Co., Renting, repairing and 
sundries. Fire-proof garage. Day and night service. 443-9 Emerson St. 

Teiephone Main " __^_ 

AT SAN JOSE— for gasoline, sundries and repairs at San Jose, stop 
at Letcher's Automobile Garage, corner First and St. James. Telephone. 

Main 

SAN JOSE— R.-'o .v St •■■: ton owners stop at Harrison P. 

gar&g * car supplies and 



SAN JOSE— Lnmolle Grill. 36-38 North First street. The best French 
dinner in California 75c. or a la carte. Automobile parties given par- 
ticular attention. _^__ 

G1LROY, CAL— Geo. E. Tlce, general machinist, expert repairing of 
automobiles and engines a specialty. Day or night service. 260 N Mon- 
E treet. 

SALINAS CAL— Hotel Bardin. Rates %2 per day and up. French chef. 
Best accommodations. Roads excellent G. Lapierre. Prop. 



26 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Jolt 6, 1907. 




BANKING 



RESURRECTION LILIES. 

As in the mire of earth God placed the seed 

Of waxen lilies, sweet and fair and pure 

As purity itself — so marvelous 

Each blossom seems a living, tender thought 

Of thai great love which whispers to our hearts 

The holy truth, that, as in grime and muck 

The seeds of what we dimly recognize 

As thoughts of God, may wait the Sun of Love 

To start them into life as radiant 

As fragrant lilies of an earthly field; 

So in the hearts of each and all of us 

A something lives that links us to the Lord. 

And with Him mortals suffer martyrdom; 

Are crucified, die, and are buried; then 

Prom our old selves that put away their sins 

As lilies push aside the soil of earth, 

We rise toward the glory of the Light 

That beams upon us from the Sun of Love, 

Whose source is hidden from our mortal eyes. 

Yet whose effulgence- warms and blesses us, 

And brings to full and perfect blossoming 

The humblest, lowest being of us all, 

Thus touched and wakened and redeemed by love 

That teacheth wisdom, although rooted deep 

In earth's dark soil, will one day grow and bloom 

In an immortal beauty, spreading far 

The sweetness of our- lives, as lilies do. 

For, taught by God's own parable, we know 

That Mighty Love itself hath thought of us, 

And placed us in the garden of the world 

That we may in His own good'time become 

God's resurrection lilies. 

— Eva Best in the Metaphysical Magazine. 

DYING DOGMA. AND LIVING RELIGION. 

I saw two forms approaching — one so straight 
So rigid straight — with narrow forehead high, 
And thin, straight hands that held before his eye 

An open book; he read, nor altered gait. 

Straight on he came, nor saw the sunset splendor 
That in the sky behind him spread its gold, 
So that I turned, its reflex to behold — 

And in the east, lo ! what a vision tender ! 

For, coming toward the sun, the second form, 

Whose very garments' fold spoke love and grace, 
Whose gentle tread did scarce a flower displace: 

A woman — sweet as sunlight after storm. 

They passed midway — her eyes were lifted high, 
His on his book; and neither saw the other. 
He kepi his way — poor Retrogression's brother — 
And she went smiling — God seemed to her so nigh. 

— Alice Spicer in New England Magazine. 

Wellcome's Photographic Exposure Record and Diarv 

gives a clear explanation of the principles which underlie cor- 
rect exposure, and puts its precepts into practice in a delight- 
fully simple way by providing a mechanical calculator which in- 
dicates correct exposure by turning one scale once. The booli 
is a correct compendium of photographic information. The ad- 
dress is given as Burroughs Wellcome & Co., 45 Lafayette 
street, New York City, so that photographers may secure the 
book. 



THE LITTLE PALACE HOTEL. 
The musical programme that is rendered at the Palace is on.' 
of the many attractions of this most popular hotel. 



The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

With which are amalgamated the Bank of British Columbia, the Halifax 
Banking Co. and the Merchants' Bank of Prince Edward Island. 
HEAD OFFICE— TORONTO. 

Paid-up Capital $10,000,000. Reserve Fund $5,000,000 

Aggregate Resources, over $113,000,000 

B. E. WALKER, President. ALEX. LAIRD, General Manager 

LONDON OFFICE— 80 Lombard St.. L. C. 

NEW YORK OFFICE— 16 Exchange Place. 

BRANCHES IN BRITISH COLUMBIA— Atlin, Cranbrook, Fernlt 
Greenwood, Kamloops, Ladysmith, Nanaimo, Nelson. New Westminster, 
Penticton, Prince Rupert, Princeton, Vancouver (3), and Victoria. 

IUKON TERRITORY— Dawson and White Horse. 

UNITED STATES — Portland, Seattle and Skagway (Alaska.) 

OTHER BRANCHES— Alberta, 25; Saskatchewan, 18; Manitoba, 20; 
Ontario and Quebec, 62; Maritime Provinces, 19. 

BANKERS IN LONDON— The Bank of England, The Bank of Scot- 
land, Lloyd's Bank, Ltd.. The Union of London, and Smith's Bank Ltd. 

AGENTS IN CHICAGO— The First National Bank. 

AGENTS IN NEW ORLEANS— The Commercial National Bank. 

SAN FRANCISCO— Main office, 326 California St. Branch— Cor. Van 
Ness and Eddy. 
A. KAINS, Manager. BRUCE HEATHCOTE. Asst. Manager. 



Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco 



Building at 7 06 Market St., Opposite Third. 

Guaranteed Capital, $1,000,000 Paid-up Cf.pltal, $300,000 

Surplus, $320,000. Assets, $10,000,000 

James D. Phelan, President; John A. Hooper, First Vice-President; 

Tames K. Moffitt. Second Vice-President; George A. Story, Cashier; C. 

B. Hobson, Asst. Cashier; A. E. Curtis, 2nd. Asst. Cashier. 

Directors — James D. Phelan, John A. Hooper, JamesK. Moffitt, Frank 
J. Sullivan, Robert McElroy, Rudolph Spreckels, Charles Holbrook. 

Interest paid on deposits. Loans on approved securities. Deposits may 
be sent by postal order, Wells, Fargo & Co., or exchange on city banks. 



The German Savings & Loan Society 



526 California Street. 
Guaranteed Capital and Surplus ... $2,603,755.68 
Capital actually paid up in cash ... 1 .000.000.00 

Deposits, June 29, 1907 - - - 38,156.931.28 

OFFICERS-President, F. Tillmann, Jr.; First Vice-President, Daniel Meyer; Second Vice-Pres- 
ident, Emi] Rohte; Cashier, A. H. R. Schmidt; Assistant Cashier, William Herrmann; Secretary. 
George Tourny; Assistant Secretary, A. H. Muller; Coodlellow & Eells, General Attorneys. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS-F. Tillmann, Jr.; Daniel Meyer. Emil Rohte, l»n. Stcinhart. I. N. 
Waller. N. Ohlendt. J. W. Van Bersen, E. T. Kruse and W. S. Goodfellow. 



The Anglo-Californian Bank, Limited 



Paid-up. $1,600,000 
Reserve Fund. $700,000 



Head Office — 18 Austin Friars, London, E. C. 
Capital Authorized. $6,000,000 
Subscribed, $3,000,000 

The bank transacts a general banking business, sells drafts, makes 
telegraphic transfers, and Issues letters of credit available throughout 
the world. Sends bills for collection, loans money, buys and sells ex- 
change and bullion. 
IGN. STEINHART, P. N. LILIENTHAL, Managers. 
. FRIEDLANDER. Cashier. 



Security Savings Bank 



316 Montgomery Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
Authorized Capital, $1,000,000 Paid-up Capital. $500,000 

Surplus and Undivided Profits, $280,000 
Banking by mall a specialty. 

Directors— William Babcock, S. L. Abbot/ O. D. Baldwin, Jos. D 
Grant. E. J. McCutchen, L. F. Monteagle R. H. Pease, Warren D 
Clark, James L. Flood, J. A. Donohoe, John Parrott, Jacob Stern. 



Central Trust Company of California 



42 Montgomery Street, Corner Sutter. 
Assets, $6,000,000 Paid-up Capital and Reserve, 11,760.000 

Authorized to act as Executor, Administrator, Guardian or Trustee. 
Check accounts solicited. Legal depository for money In Probate Court 
proceedings. Interest paid on Savings Accounts at 3 6-10 per cent per 
annum. 



London, Paris and American Bank, Ltd. 



N. W. COR. SANSOME AND SUTTER STS. 

Subscribed Capital, $2,600,000. Paid-up Capital, $2,000,000 

Reserve Fund, $1,200,000. 

Head Office — 40 Threadneedle St., London, E. C. 

AGENTS — New York — Agency of the London, Paris and American 

Bank, Limited, No. 10 Wall street, N. Y.; Paris — Messrs. Lazard Freres 

& Cle, 17 Boulevard Poissonter. Draw direct on the principal cities of 

the world. Commercial and Travelers' credits Issued. 

S. Greenebaum I .. 

H. Fleishhacter I Manaeer. 

R. Allschul. Cashier 



OUR STANDARDS 



Sperrys Beat rfcmily. 

Drifted Snow. 
I Golden Gate Extra.. 



vSperry Flour Company 



.Iii.y 6, 190? 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



27 



"Oh, George," die exclaimed, "now that you've seen my 

ih'H ImI yon sini[il\ can't regret that I got it. Isn't it just a 
poem?" "•Will, if it is," replied John, "I suppose a proper title 
for it would be 'Owed to a Milliner.' " — Philadelphia Press. 

=-Thawabey — But what have \'ou against my friend, Selly? 

Bawker — Ee has so many confounded new-fangled metres. 
Thawabey — I admit he's original there; but his matter is all 
right. There's nothing new in that. — Town and Country. 

"How far are we from Chicago?" asks the passenger, 

plucking at the sleeve of the conductor as that official passes 
him. "Three wrecks, one misplaced switch and a washout," 
answers the conductor, hastening on, lighting his red lantern as 
he goes. — Life. 

Mr. Justcott — Why, what are you crying about, dear 5 

Mrs. Justcott — Oh, George ! The mice have got into the pantry 
and eaten up a beautiful custard pie I made myself ! Mr. Just- 
cott — There, there ! Don't cry over a few little mice ! — Cleveland 
Leader. 

'The Kid's Mother — Of course people joke about it and 

all that, but just the same baby may grow up to be President. 
The Family Friend — Or if he is not president, he may become 
'a deliberate and unqualified falsifier,' which is almost as promi- 
nent, you know. — Puck. 

-i"Look out," exclaimed the man who had seen another 



bravely rescued from the water. "Handle that fellow carefully, 
or he might revive." "Brute !" exclaimed the rescuers. "Brute 
nothing," rejoined the first speaker. "I noticed him rocking 
the boat." — Philadelphia Public Ledger. 

Parson (who has been visiting the school, to son of local 

groom) — I'm sorry to hear you spell badly, Johnnie. Now, (<•! 1 
me. S-a-d-d-1-e. What is that? (No answer.) You should 
know that. What, is it your father puts on a horse every day? 
Johnnie — A bob each way, sir. — Punch. 

Lady (on train, hearing Scotchman grunting with disgusl 

on passing advertisement board) — Ah, I sec you agree with me 
thai those vandals should not be allowed to spoil this lovely 
scenery by pulling up such hideous things. Sandy — Nay, i 1 
vresna that. But she's no guid whuskev. — Punch. 

"Now here," said the enthusiastic real estate agent to 

the prominent politician, "is one of the most desirable bouses 

in the capital. It has exposures all around " "Good heav- 
ens!" cried the prominent politician with a start of dismay. 
"that's just what I'm trying to get away from." — Baltimort 

A merican. 

"Miss Kilty." said the new doctor, "your trouble is mere- 
ly indigestion. We can fix that. By the way, have ■ 
lining :m\ dieting?" "1 don't know," answered the little girl. 
"The other doctor has been making me cat all Borta of things 

thai I jusl hale." "Then you're dieting, all right" — Chicago 

Tribune. 

"1 told that poor young widow." began Mrs. Xurilch. 

"that you'd give her hoy work if " "Well. I won't." inter- 
rupted Xurilch. "She sent him to-day with a note tha 
T must find employment for my son. even if he works tor a 

pittance.' The nerve of her calling me 'a mere pittance.' 
— Ph Uadelph ia Press . 



The standard of honesty in the ranks of union labor con- 
tinues to fall. The latest to date is the record of Patrick Furlong, 
treasurer of the Stevedores' and Riggers' Union, for wli 
rest a warrant has been issued. Furlong is charged with 
decamped with some $8,000 belonging to his fellow tin 
Thus far. union labor, in both official and unofficial 
contributed more than its share to the cohorts of crime I 
intelligence and limited moral sense- make a tierce combil 



LUNCH AND DINNER 

at the Little Palace Hotel, at Posl and Leavenworth, are 

that are worth while. All the splendid chef, and Ih. 

the old house, combined with an exquisite menu. 



Pacific Coast Branch 
JAMES BUCHANAN C& CO., Ltd. 

LONDON 

People of Refinement and Wine Intelligence 
ask for and drink PERRIER JOUET CHAM- 
PAGNE. Treat yourselves kindly and ask 
for (Blue Top-) 

VARNEY W. GASRILL, Pacific Coast Manager, 

Oakland, Cal. 



Alaska-San Francisco Route 



TO 



NOME AND ST. MICHAEL 

DIRECT 



INDIANA 

3335 TONS - - - GRAHAM, MASTER 



SECOND SAILING FROM SAN FRANCISCO, JULY 6, 1907 
oMaking four round trips direct during the season. 



FOR FURTHER INFORMATION APPLY TO 



KJR N 2wo BARNESON-HIBBERD CO. 



1 72 EAST ST. 
SAN FRANCISCO 



FOR. 



Country Homes and Bungalows 



Lat«st effects in ENGLISH, FRENCH and DOMES- 
TIC WALL PAPERS, CRETONNES, TAFFETAS, 
CASEMENT MATERIALS, PLAIN and FANCY 
NETS are now being displayed by us. cTWany of 
the patterns are in stock for immediate delivery. 

We are showing an excellent assortment of WIL- 
LOW and MAHOGANY furniture upholstered in 
CRETONNES and TAFFETAS. 

L. KREISS 8 SONS 

Dealers in 

MAHOGANY, OAK AND MAPLE FURNITURE 

1219, 1221, 1223 Post Street, Above Van Ness oAvenue 



Searcher of Recor 


ds for Alameda 


County 






AND 






Examiner 


of Land Titles 






G.W. 


McKeand 




OFFICE: 


458 8th Street, West of Broadway, 


Oakland 



|aNDAJ\d1nvESTA\ENTG0. 

iAkei p ot^t.Iake Co. Cal. 
Sen? for Snaps in Farms, 

L;TlRATURE On f\?PL,CAT|ON 



28 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 6, 1907 



C@ini§@[rwftiknffii 

By Franklin K. Lane. 

Thousands of Americans sincerely believe that the United 
States is politically the most radical country on this round planet. 
Hardly a day passes lately without the publication of some 
alarming prophecy of the evil that will surely befall unless wd 
mend our ways and utterly destroy those dangerous persons who, 
by one means or another, are seeking to change things. We have 
forsaken the gods of the elder days, and are following after 
strange red gods of modem manufacture. Prosperity is to be 
destroyed and individual liberty and initiative are to be sub- 
merged in the rising sea of American radicalism. Woe is to be 
our portion and desolation will fall upon the land. And all thi<, 
indeed, because one man favors the imposition of a tax on in- 
comes, and another favors a tax on inheritances, and still one 
more would decrease the number of working children, and yet 
another would reduce street railway fares or curb illegal indus- 
trial combinations. 

There is nothing, to be sure, that stands between this country 
and any form of confiscatory policy that can be imagined except- 
ing the letter of our laws and the spirit of our people. These, 
however, are quite sufficient. 

This Government is organically conservative. We could not, 
though we would, do violence to property rights without, wreck- 
ing the Government in substance and in form. The funda- 
mental law of the nation contains provisions more surely pro- 
tecting property than are to be found in the laws of any other 
land. We have no doctrine that the king can do no wrong, or 
that the State can do no wrong. The right to property is a vital 
part of our organic tew. The police powers of the State are 
broad, but this is necessarily so. There could be no Government 
of any kind without such powers ; they inhere in Government it- 
self. Not only has this right to possess and enjoy property been 
anchored into the foundation stones of the Republic, but the 
people, if so disposed, have been deprived of the power to amend 
or alter the Constitution save by the most elaborate and almost 
impossible procedure. And to remove still further the danger 
of hasty and passionate expression, every legislative body, 
national, State or municipal, is deprived of the power to convert 
its will into law without being subject to the check of the courts. 
Thus the Congress of the United States is less absolute than the 
Parliament of England or the Chambers of France. 

These constitutional limitations upon the power of the people 
are our own; they are to be found nowhere else. Yet they ap- 
parently have no place in the thought or consideration of those 
alarmists who are somewhat monotonously declaiming upon ttw 
dangers of radicalism in the United States. 

The American people themselves may be safely classed as the 
most conservative among the civilized peoples if we are to judge 
from their legislation. Things we call radical, other nations, 
older and perhaps soberer than ourselves, regard to-day as mere 
commonplaces. Many of the very ideas which alarm" (he con- 
servatives of America are accepted and approved by conservatives 
elsewhere. And if those who speak in honest fear of present radi- 
cal tendencies among our people will in all calmness review the 
proposals advanced by American statesmen, they will have dilli- 
culty in finding a single one which has not been debated in the 
parliaments of Europe, and tested by one or more of those w ■ 
call the great nations of the Old World. Tory statesmen of <>] 1 
England (whose policies did not Bpring, be it said, from fear of 
losing their seats) favored laws a full half-century ago which 
to the Americans of to-day seem perilous experiments. Germany's 
system of compulsory insurance and Great Britain's land polii v 
in Ireland are, in point of paternalism, beyond the utmost hounds 
of any political programme seriously supported in America. It 
must be conceded that since the early years of our life we have 
done little to establish our right to pro-eminence in the world of 
political science, and it is difficult lo refute the contention that 
other peoples have labored more zealously than ourselves to es- 
tablish justice and equality under popular Government and to 
perfect its forms. Not that we are indifferent to these things, 
but since the Civil War our minds have been obsessed by greal 
material experiments and exploitations, and thus it has come 
about that we have permitted others to experiment for us in the 
political laboratory. We needed a secret ballot for many years, 
and one came to us at. last from Australia — not by the direct 
route, however, but via Suez and across the Canadian border. 



uORLICKs 



For Travelers 

FThe best aid in sea-sick- 
ness or car sickness. 



' It is both food and drink— agreeable 
to the taste, soothing to the stomach, 
and quick to digest. 

There is the same nutriment in a 
glass of Horlick's Malted Milk, or a 
few Horlick's Malted Milk Tablets as 
you would get from the average lunch. 
You can take Horlick's easily when 
the stomach refuses other foods. 
Easy to carry; easy to prepare; easy to 
digest. Sold by druggists everywhere. 

Served on trains, 
steamers 
and at lead- 
ing hotels. 




:•■'. 



H 



Ask for 

Horlick's 

— others ar© 

imitations. 



The Ideal 
food for 
alt ages. 



So, too, its complement, the Purity of Elections Law, followed 
almost literally the Corrupt Practices Act of England. Our rail- 
way, factory and other regulative measures of much prominence 
were born of foreign parents. Indeed, one has difficulty to find 
so-called radical legislation which did not originate in some other 
land and take from ten to fifty years to cross the ocean. This is 
one industry in which the balance of trade has been altogether 
against us in recent times. We have imported some of the reform 
ideas of other lands, but have not been able to show a corre- 
sponding offset in the exportation of similar domestic products. 
One does not hear of any practical political reform, or even any 
economic theory, of American origin, causing debate in France, 
Switzerland, England or New Zealand, excepting that in several 




MAKE YOUR BEDROOM 

Notable for its expression of refinement and feeling of repose. 
We will gladly" assist you in doing this with our carefully 
selected stock of Wall Paper and Fabrics. We carry" the 
things you are looking for, and at the right prices. 
L. TOZER. &. SON CO. 
Interior Decorators 

1527 Pine St , Bel ween Van Ness and Polk. San Francisco, 
187 Twelfth St.. near Madison, Oakland. 



July 6, 1907. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



39 



foreign lands a much wanner reception has been given to Henry 
George's theory of taxation than has been extended lo it in (his 
country. Altogether, therefore, il would appear that the United 
States is not entitled to a seat on the Extreme Left in the Par- 
liament of llie Nations. 

Patently, the fact that other peoples may have found certain 
Institutions or laws advantageous or beneficial is not a demon- 
stration that we should incorporate them in our own system. 
Policies and measures may flourish and give rich returns in on.' 
land and produce naught but evil in another. The value of any 
piece of political machinery depends upon those who use it, their 
political upbringing, and the "set" of their natures. One need 
not, however, be either Socialist or dreamer because he proposes 
an Old World remedy for a New World symptom. 

To those who see nothing in the political, social or economic 
conditions now prevailing that calls for improvement, there must 
of course be something extremely absurd in any suggestion of 
new legislation. And so also to those who have adopted the easy 
philosophy that all political action is predestined to be futile. Bui 
to those who believe that the problems of a people change with 
the changes in the. form and nature of their life, it would seem 
inevitable that they should feel a desire to see the machinery of 
society adapted as speedily and smoothly as possible to its new 
work. Hitherto we have had to meet but few of the problems 
of the more congested countries. The land has been rich enough 
to offer abundant opportunity to all. The distance between rich 
and poor has been so comparatively slight that it has been pos- 
sible to step from one class into the other. Employer and em- 
ployee have been neighbors and friends. We lived a narrow 
individualistic life — the life of the town-meeting, the church, 
and the farm. But who shall say that this old order is not pass- 
ing, or has not already passed away? Instead of the town, we 
have the great city in which one out of every twelve who die is 
buried by the municipality. Instead of the individual employer, 
we have the impersonal corporation. Instead of the individual 
employee, we have the sensitive, shrewdly directed labor union, 
representing perhaps a million men, with which to bargain". In- 
stead of the farm whereon all was raised that the family needed, 
we have the farm which turns out a special product, and is en- 
tirely dependent upon the city for supplies. Instead of the 
single industry, we have the trust. Instead of competition, we 
have "community of interest" — extending across seas and around 
the world. Instead of the local railroad owned at home, we have 
the transcontinental system owned abroad. Instead of the little 
paper in the little town, we have the metropolitan daily reaching 
the remotest household. Instead of the country store, we have 
the mail order house. Instead of the boss, we have the syndi- 
cate. Big things have taken the place of small ones in all field-. 
We have become apparently interdependent to the fullest degi 
This is not the work of Government, nor has it been consciously 
effected. We thought at first that it was temporary; we know 
now that it means a mental as well as an industrial growth. Men 
think in continents where once they thought in villages, and in 
millions where once they thought in thousands, Men think, too. 
in relationships and not as solitary units. To this new order 
society and all its agencies must adapt itself. 

The world, for it is a world movement, must deal with the 
new problems to which this spirit of combination and interde- 
pendence may give birth. They must be met in each land 
a manner suited to the form of its Government and the natu 
its people. They are to he dealt with in the United States 
cording to our laws and the temperament and ideal- of our peo- 
ple. Again we are to he given an opportunity to prove the 
adaptability and the efficiency of a republican form of govern- 
ment. To find a way through — this is the statesman's problem: 
a way tha ind not contention, security and not 

shipwreck; a way that is not to bo found by those who would 
substitute an artificial for a social order, nor yet hv those who 
would deny to society the right more perfectly to express itE 
its purposes and ambitions. There can he no peace and no 
irity without maintenance of the law and a steady intvn 
justice, and the dangerous class 1 of thos. . 

whatsoever name they mav be .ailed, who. through igl 
malice, or indifference, imperil all law by justifying or seeming 
to justify inju- 



DOCTORS 



who have had oxpurioi 



18 READING AN EFFORT? 
We can make it a pleasure for you. Hirsch 4 Kaiser, opticians. 
ITS'! Fillmore street, San Francisco. 



.. 



H 



Glycozone 

Endorse and successfully use it in the treatment of 
DYSPEPSIA 

and other stomach diseases. GLYCOZONE is absolutely harmless. 
It cleanses the lining membrane of the stomach, and subdues in- 
flammation, thus helping nature to accomplish a cure, which ac- 
counts for the gratifying results that are obtained. To con- 
vince Dyspeptics that GLYCOZONE cannot fail to help them, I 
will send to any one mentioning this magazine and enclosing 25c. 
to pay forwarding charges 

A $1.00 Bottle Free 

(Only one bottle to a family.) 




Chemistond Graduate of tin- "Ecola Centrals des 

Arts et Manufactures, do Paris--Franco, 



Sold by leading 
druggists. 

None genuine 
without 
my signature. 



64 F Prince Street-, New York 
FREE! Valuable booklet on How to Treat Diseases. 




New 
Poodle 

Dog 

Restaurant 
and 

O 1 N. W. Corner 

n ° tel Polk S Post Sts. 



Phone 
Franklin 2960 



San Francisco 



OAKLAND'S BEAUTIFUL NEW HOTEL 

The Key Route Inn 

Twenty-Second street and Broadway 

NOW OPEN 

V S. Mullan. Mgr. 



City Index and Purchasers' Guide 

GOLD AND SILVER PLATER. 
John O. Bellls, 1624 A California St.. San Francisco. 

DRESS PLEATING. 
California Pleating Co., 1624 California St.. San Francisco. 

LADIES' TAILORS. 
Vogel & Bishoff. 1626 Sutter street. San Francisco. 

COLLECTION AGENCY. 
D. A. Curtin, 323 Monadnock Building. Accounts collected everywhere. 
Reference — Banks and merchants. 

DENTISTS. 
Alfred E. Blake. M. D. Diseases of the Mouth and teeth. Office hours: 
•30 a. m.; 2 to 3:30 p. m. Office. 1703 OFarrell street, cor. Fill- 
more, San Francisco. Telephone West 4003. 

Dr. Byron W. Haines, 1424 Cough street. N. E. comer Post. Bergren 
tuiilding. San Francisco. Phone Franklin 1606. Hours from 9 to 4 o'clock 

RENOVATORIES. 
Golden West Rensvatory, 31 Telegraph avenue, Oakland. Suits cleaned 
| ressed. $1.00. Ring uj> ' 

ATTORNEYS- AT-LAW. 

Samuel M. Shortridge, 1101 O'Farrell street, corner Franklin. San Fran- 
cisco. 

Hiram W. Johnson has removed his office to 1005 Webster street, comer 
Pine, San Franc :- 

ARCHITECTS. 
Wright, Rushforth & Cahill. 371 California street. San Francisco. 

INVALID CHAIRS. 
Sold, rented, exchanged; manufacturers of Eames tricycle chair, lfto*. 
Market street, near Octavla. Telephone Fell 9911. 



30 



SAN FKANCISCO NEWS LETTBE 



July 6, 1907. 






tBfe numerous small lakes and 


The 


streams adjacent make this resort 


Taliac, 


headquarters for rod fisherman. 


Lake 


San Franciscans are especially 


invited to write for terms for their 


Tahoe, 


families. 


Cal. 


cTW. LAWRENCE C& CO. 




Taliac. 




Monte 
Rio 



Agua 

Galiente 
Springs 



Open the year round. The springs that HOLD 
THE RECORD for business during 1906. The 
Reasons: Wonderful curative properties of the 
waters; superb service; excellent table; easy of 
access. Every modern Improvement has been 
added to this already famous resort. The wat- 
ers contain sulphur, alum, iron, soda, magnesia, 
iodine and traces of arsenic, and are very effi- 
cacious in cases of rheumatism, neuralgia, 
rheumatic gout, kidney and liver diseases, lead 
and mercurial poisoning and all bladder and 
urinary complaints. 

Hunting and trout fishing; amusements of all 
kinds. Our table is our advertisement. Rates 
$12 to ?17.50 a week. Baths free. Trains leave 
Third and Townsend streets at 8:30 a. m. Direct 
stage connections for the springs. Send for 
booklet. Address W. J. McDONALD, Proprie- 
tor. 



Hotel 

Bon 

Air 


Newly renovated and now under first-class 
management. Hot and cold water In every room. 
Delightfully located in heart of Ross Valley. 
Take Sausalito Ferry to Escalle. Only 45 min- 
utes from San Francisco. Ideal home for busi- 
ness men and families. Open the year round. 
Terms reasonable. For further particulars ad- 
dress STRASSBURGER & PARKER, Postofflce, 
Larkspur, Cal. 



THE SWITZERLAND OF CALIFORNIA. 
Most delightfully situated on banks of Russian 
River. Rates ?2 per day, $12 per week For fur- 
ther particulars, address C. F. CARR, Monte 
Rio, Sonoma County, California. 



The 


FOR AN OUTING ON RUSSIAN RIVER. 


$10 per week and up. Everything good. 


Palms 


Tents if desired. H. B. CROCKER, Healds- 


burg, California. 



THE nearest Hot Sulphur Springs to San 
Francisco. Largest mineral water swimming 
tank in the State. No staging. 4 trains dally. 
For information, address THEO. RICHARDS, 
Agua Callente, Sonoma County, Cal. 



SANTA CRUZ 

The Atlantic City of the Pacific 

World's most beautiful playground 

Never a Dull Moment 

Summer Season opens May 1st 



Grand Opening of New Casino and Bathing 

Pavilion announced later I 



Paraiso 

Hot 

Springs 



Skaggs 

Hot 

Springs 



Tassajara 

Hot 

Springs 



New Ownership and Management. Grandest 
and most accessible of all resorts. Only seven 
miles of beautiful staging. Waters awarded 
first prize at St. Louis Exposition. 

Natural hot loda. sulphur, plunge and tub hatha, 104 to 1 16 de 
greet, for rheumatism, malaria and all stomach troubles. Iron and 
arsenic waters; altitude 1400 feel. Swimming tank, hunting, fine 
fishing, bowling, tennis, croquet, dancing; gas. Expert masseurs- 
Round trip. $8. Rates. $10 50 to $16. bathj included. Table 
unexcelled. 

Information at any S. P. office or H. H. Mc. 
GOWAN, Proprietor and Manager, Paraiso 
Spiings, Monterey county, Cal. 



Witter 

Medical 

Springs 


Witter, the most famous medical springs in 
the West. In the heart of the mountains, 
commanding a magnificent view of Clear Lake, 
The automobile headquarters of Lake County. 
You can play tennis, ride, bowl, fish and bathe 
in the lakes or climb mountains. In Witte r 
Springs you will find a first class place at a 
reasonable rate. 

Write for inbrnilion to ALBERT J. ARROLL/ Manager, 
at the Springs, or to the General Offices of Witter Springs Co.. 647 
Van Ness Ave.. San Francisco. 


The 

Geysers 

Hot 

Springs 


America's greatest health and pleasure resort. 
Positive cure for rhumatlsm, stomach trouble. 
Natural mineral steam and hot mineral plunge 
baths. Tepid swimming lake. Good fishing and 
hunting. Climate unsurpassed. Our table 
speaks for Itself. All kinds of outdoor amuse- 
ments; dancing every evening. Livery and 
dairy connected with hotel. Rates, $10 to $14 
per week. Electric lights, telephone and post- 
office In hotel. Round trip tickets via North- 
western Pacific R. R. For further particulars, 
address R. H. CURRY, Proprietor, The Geysers. 
Sonoma County, Cal. 



SONOMA COUNTY. Only 4 1-2 hours from 
San Francisco and but 9 miles staging. Stages 
meet both morning and evening trains to and 
from San Francisco at Geyserville. Round-trip 
only $5.10. Terms, $2 a day or $12 a week. 
Reference: Any guest of the past 12 years. In- 
formation at Peck-Judah Bureau, 789 Market 
street, Bryan's Bureau, 1732 Fillmore St., or of 
J. F. Mulgrew, Skaggs, Cal. 



Monterey County. Best health and pleasure re- 
sort In California. Eighteen hot mineral springs, 
hot sulphur plunges; wonderful vapor baths; 
trout fishing; $12 to $14. Stage leaves Salinas 
Monday, Wednesday and Friday mornings. Peck 
Information Bureau, 789 Market street, San 
Francisco, or C. W. QUILTY, Tassajara Hot 
Springs, Monterey County. 



JtJLT 6, 1907. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



31 




icmraHG 



LKVJiL Wil'KtXJ&L 

UNDER THE NEW MANAGEMENT 

of 

MARINER 8 GRAIG 

Write and secure rates for a long stay at the Springs. 
A new garage for the accommodation of Automobile 
tourists. Rates SI 2.00 to 1 16.00 per week. 











The New Hotel 






' '""'^H ^HV"^H^^tt 


LssssssssfsssssssssT 1 




L 


§W 


11 HI 


Vendome 

San Jose 

Thoroughly rebuilt and 
refumifhed Uhexcel- 
led cuis ne. Every 








; . WW 


modern convenience, 
charmingly located in 
beautiful park, swim* 
ming pools, bowling 
alleys, tennis courts. 










commercial men down 


town. 


A delightful place to spend the summer 


Rates reasonable, 

CHAS. C. WELLMAN. Manager. 



LA PINTORESCA 

The most comfortable 
and homelike hotel in 
PASADENA, CALIFOR- 
NIA. 

Situated on elevated 
ground in a grove of or" 
anges and palms, sur- 
rounded by the Sierra Madre mountains. Elegant rooms; table un- 
surpassed; pure water; perfect appointments; tennis, billiards. No 
winter, no pneumonia, no tropical malaria. 
Write for booklet to M. D. PAINTER, Proprietor, Pasadena. Cal 




Glenbrook 

LAKE COUNTY, CAL. 



In the heart of the forest. Good hunting and fishing. Pleasant 
drives and walks. Amusements of all kinds. Excellent table. 
Rates $10 to $14 per week. For further particulars apply to 
c'VRS. S. TREADWAY, Glenbrook P. O., Lake Co., Cal. 




Campers 

Contemplating a 
trip of any kind 
to the interior should know 
that they can obtain all 
the stable essentials at one place, 
near all shipping points, quick 
delivery, finest goods, lowest prices, courteous 
salesmen and competent packers. Let us fi- 
gure with you and supply you. Freight pre- 
paid. Suburban deliveries. All orders free. 

Smiths' Cash Store, Inc. 

UNIVERSAL PROVIDERS 



14 to 24 S ten-art St. 



San Francisco, Gal. 



Blue Lakes 



Send for pamphlets. $10 to $12 
per week. O. WEISMAN, Mid- 
lake, Lake County", Cal. 



WBBN IN LOS ANGELES STOP AT THB 



Hotel Westminster 



European Plan SI. 00 per day and up. 
With bath S1.50 and op. 

Moderate Priced Cafe; Uneieelled Cainin*; Centrally 
Located; 100 Rooma wltfl Bath 

Fonrth and Main Streets, Los Angeles, California 

F. 0. JOHNSON. Proprietor 



The Original 
White Sulphur Springs 


Until New Hotel Buildings are 
erected guests can be accommodat- 
ed at private table, home plan, for 
limited number. Communicate 
with MR. and MRS. JOHN SAN- 
FORD, St. Helena, Napa Co.,Cal. 



Vichy Springs, 
Mendocino. 
Co., Cal. 



Celebrated for Beauty Bath. Pronounced by 
experts a natural skin beautlfter. Write for 
booklet. J. A. REDEMEYER, Prop. 



Duncan 
Springs 



2 MILES FROM HOPLAND. Mineral watera. 
magnesia, soda. Iron, sulphur and borax. Every 
comfort and convenience. Kates. Ill per week 
up. HOWELL BROS., Hopland. Mendocino 
County. California. 



32 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 6, 1907. 




The wonderful sparkling champagne spring at Vichy Springs 
near Ukiah. 

WHAT TEE RUSK SAID. 

Close I" Iiit heart I have nestled, 

Ami (lie warmth of her fragrant skin, 

Eas pierced each velvety petal 
To the glowing heart within. 

This morning a creature of beauty 

With colors rich and rare; 
This evening crushed and broken! 

Yet think not I despair. 

For two melting lips have kissed me 

And murmured soft love words. 
Then quick to her heart she pressed me 

With hands like fluttering birds. 

And dropped me within her bosom, 

Where for hours in bliss I lay, 
Content to feel her heart's quick beats, 

And at the close of day, 

To send a last expiring sigh 

Out on the quiet air. 
My life! YouM give yours, too, I ween, 

To have a tomb as fair. 

— Faniia Smith. 



Japanese as well as Americans seem to be in total ig- 
norance of a certain fundamental principle of this Government, 
which is that suffrage is not conferred for tin g I of the indi- 
vidual, but for the good of the State and nation. That is why 
the ballot box is not wide open to every one. 



Fairmont Hotel 

SAN FRANCISCO 
The Most Superbly Situated Hotel in the World 

EUROPEAN PLAN 

All rooms outside; every room with a bath 
Rates $2.50 and upward. Special terms 
to permanent, guests. Management, of 

The PALACE HOTEL COMPANY 



As Europe sees the political situation in this country, if 

the Republicans fail to nominate Roosevelt, the Democrats will. 
A kindergarten to teach the American game of politics would 
pa<- on the other side of the pond. 



<T 



*% 



Hotel St. Francis 



Grill Room 



The 
The 



Best 
Best 



Service 
Meals 



SAN FRANCISCO 

Take Your Friends There 
For Luncheon 



^ s 



J> 



There's Only One Del Monte 

Golf, Sea-Bathing, Motoring. Parlor Car from San Francisco 
twice daily. Special week end rates. Free Art exhibition and 
sales gallery of California painters. Week end golf tournament 
during the summer. 

Inquire Peck-Judah Co., 789 Market St. Information Bureau 
Southern Pacific, Flood Building or Del Monte, California ,H. R- 
Warner .Manager, 



Mrs. Winslow's Soothing Syrup for children's teething Is guaranteed 

under the Food and Drug Act, Serial No. 1098. 




Soda 

Bay 

Springs 

Lake Co., Cal. 



Situated on the picturesque shore of Clear 
Lake. Finest of boating, bathing, hunting and 
fishing; unsurpassed accommodations; new 
launch, accommodating 40 people, built ex- 
pressly for the use of guests and excursions. 
Terms, $2 per day, $12 per week; special rates 
to families. Take Tiburori Ferry, 7:40 a. m., 
thence by rail to Pieta, then stage or automo- 
bile direct to springs. Rpund trip, good for 
six months, $9. Further Information, address 
Peck-Judah Bureau, 789 Market street, Bryan's 
Bureau, 1732 Fillmore street, Managers, and 
J. McBride and Agnes Bell Rhoads, Soda Bay 
Springs, Lake County, Cal., via Kelseyvllle 
Postofhce. 



Howard 
Springs 

Lake Go,, Gal. 



Cures all cases of kidney and liver trouble. 
The friend of the rheumatic and gout patient; 
42 mineral springs. Hot sulphur and iron 
plunge baths. Magnesia tub baths. References 
— Any guest for the last twenty years. Rates, 
$12 to $16 per week. Fare from San Francisco, 
$9 round trip. Leave San Francisco 7.30 a. m., 
via S. P., or 8 a. m. via Cal. and Northwestern 
R. R. Send for catalogue, or address J. W. 
LAYMANCE. Owner and Manager, Howard 
Springs, Lake County, Cal. 



Soda Bay Springs. 



GOODYEAR RUBBER COMPANY 

R. H. PEASE, President 

Have Returned to Their Old Home, Where They Were Located Before the Fire 

573-5T9 Market, Street*, near Second 

Tel. Temporary 1788 



GERMEA 



FOR 

BREAKFAST 



THE JOHNSON-LOCKE MERCANTILE COMPANY, AGENTS 



Neuhaus & Co. i„ c . 



MERCHANT 
TAILORS 



1618 Ellis Street near Fillmore 

formerly 727-729-731 M.rlet Slre.1. 



Suits to order from $ 1 5.00 up. A fine Piquet Worsted 
or Serge Suit to Order for $20.00 worth $30.00. 

This reduction is made to get you acquainted with our 
new location. Fit and workmanship guaranteed. 



NEUHAUS (& Co. 



San Francisco 1618 ELLIS ST. near Fillmore 



COSTLESS COOKING 



Heat Baking Oven 7 minutes 

Put in (Biscuits) for 9 minutes 

TURN OF all burners for 5 minutes 

Then open oven door Done 

Can time to a minute. 

Cook With Gas 

Oakland Gas, Light and Heat Company 

13th and Clay Streets, Oakland, Cal. 



Tonopah, Goldfield, Bullfrog, Manhattan and Comstocks a Specialty 

Z A D I G & CO. 

STOCK BROKERS. 
Formerly 306 Montgomery street, have resumed business in their 

Own building, 324 Bush street 

Directly opposite New S. F. Stock and Exchange Building. 



UNION LUMBER COMPANY 

REDWOOD AND PINE LUMBER. 
Redwood Ties. Telegraph Poles. Shingles. Split Shakes. Etc. 

Main Office — Monadnock Bldg.. San Francisco. 
ml Planing Mills— Sixth and Channel sts.. S;>n Francisco. 



BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 



Paper 



1400 to 1450 Fourth St.. San Francisco. Telephone Market 3014. 
Private Exchange Connecting all Departments. 



The F. Thomas Parisian Dyeing and 
Cleaning Works 

Cleansing Dainty Garments our Specialty 

Our new monthly contract for gentlemen — 1 suit a week cleaned 
and pressed, including small repairs. 

$1.50 Per Month 

We clean ladies' and gentlemen's automobile suits to perfection 
and return in 24 hours if brought to 

1158 McAllister street 

Oakland Office — 1164 Broadway, Oakland. 



MORE 



homes of Oakland, Berkeley and Alameda receive the 

OAKLAND TRIBUNE 

each evening than all other Oakland papers combined. 

Fearless, Independent, Readable, Reliable. 

Largest evening paper on the Pacific Coast. On all trains and at 
news-stands. 



Carnegie Brick and Pottery Co. 

M. A. MURPHY, General Manager. 

Vitrified Brick, Paving Brick, Fire Brick, Fire Tile, Fire Clay, 

Dust, Drain Tile, Acid Jars, Acid Pipes, Acid Bricks. 

Architectural 'lerra Cotta, Hollow Tile Fire-Proofing, Semi-Dry 

Pressed Brick. Terra Cotta Chlr v Pipe, Brick and Tile Mantels. 

Plue Linings, rjn Vasi ■ Flower Puis. All kinds of Vitrified 

Salt-Glazed Sew. r Pipi 

Factory; Tesli, VI; Yumty. Cal. Yards: San Francisco. 

Oakland, Berkeley, San Jose. 

Office — 1Cth and Division Sts., San Francisco. 



Member Stock and Bond Exchange. 

Member San Francisco Mining Exchange. 

J. C. WILSON, Broker 

STOCKS AND BONDS 
INVESTMENT SECURITIES 

488 California St., San Francisco. 
Telephone. Temporary 815. KOHL BUILDING. 



PRESS CLIPPINGS 

Get the Habit 

of using our Pre* In whatever diversion you may be 

Interested and you will marvel at ' The "Argrus" has 

eyes, you only two, so let us do the work for you. Bend five 

for a final order with your desired instructions. We will 

de tii. i eel and t eneflt you hi 

ARGUS PRESS CLIPPING BUREAU, 

Otto Spongier, Director. 

352 Third avenue, New York City. 



DR. H. J. STEWART 

Organist of St Dominic's Church, and the Temple Sherlth Israel. 

n. Harmony and Composition. 
New Studio — 2517 California Street. 



MURPHY GRANT & CO. 

Wholesale Dry Goods 

N. E. cor. Market ar.d Sansome Sts.. San Francisco. Cal. 
New ;it f*«r temporary 

The erection of a new steel structure will in, be com- 

■ 







AN OLD ENGLISH DINING ROOM 



We are thoroughly equipped for all period decoration and house-furnishing in the manner of the above 
illustration. Mr. William D. McCann is personally in charge of this department. 



We are displaying in our well lighted and spacious snow rooms--tne finest 
in San Francisco—the most complete assortments of exclusive and 

Moderate- Priced Furniture, 
Carpets, Oriental and Domestic 
Rugs and Draperies 

that can be found in this city. We offer the same advantages to all in- 
tending buyers, whether the purchase be large or small. 

We are wholesalers as well as retailers and for this reason are in a 
position to give values not obtainable elsewhere. Inspect our goods, compare 
our prices and you will be convinced that no such buying opportunities are 
to be had as those offered continuously by 

D. N. & E. WALTER & CO. 

Van Ness and Sacramento 

" Since 1858 " San Francisco 




THE HOTEL OOLONIAI (H. T. BLETHEX. MAXAOER), STOCKTON ST.. BET. SUTTEK 
>\N VUAXCISCO. BUILT BY THE L1XDGREX HICKS CO. 




Southern Pacific 






Ticket Office, Flood Building 
San Francisco 




VACATION TIME HERE 

WHERE WILL YOU SPEND IT? HOW WILL YOU GO? 

WHAT WILL IT COST? 

Questions often asked. 
OUR SUGGESTIONS:-- 

Shasta and Mountain Resorts. Klamath and 
Crater Lakes. Lake Tahoe. Yosemite. Kings 
and Kern Canyons. Santa Cruz and Mountain 
Resorts. Boulder. Wrights. Laurel. Mt. 
Hermon. Glenwood. Capitola. Del Monte. 
Monterey. Pacific Grove. Paso Robles Hot 
Springs. El Pizmo. 

Hunting, Fishing, Boating, Bathing, Mountain 
Climbing, Cottage, Tent, Camp Life, Excellent 
Hotel Accommodations. Low summer vacation 
rates via 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
California Safe Deposit and Trust Company. 

For the six months ending .June 30, 1907, a dividend has been declared 
on all deposits in the savings department of this company at the rate 
of four (4) per cent per annum, free of taxes, and payable on and after 
Monday. July 1, 1907. The same rate of interest will be paid by our 
branch offices located at 1531 Devisadero street, 2572 Mission street, 1740 
Fillmore street, and 19th and Minnesota streets. Iiividends not drawn 
will be added to the deposit account, become a part thereof, and earn 
dividend from July 1, 1907. J. DALZELL BROWN. Mgr. 

Office — Corner California and Montgomery streets, San Francisco. 



Fabric 



Cretonnes 

Rugs and Carpets 

Wall Paper 



TAYLOR-SINCLAIR. CO. 

Bush aL Van Ness 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Humboldt Savings Bank. 
For the half year ending June 30, 11)07. a dividend on all savings de- 
posita has been declared at the rate of three and eight-tenths i3 8-10) 
per cent per annum, free of taxes, payable Oil and after MONDAY. July 
i. 1907. Dividends not called for an added to and bear the same rate 
of interest as the principal fiom Julv 1, 1907. 

W. E. PALMER, Cashier. 
Office — G46 Market street, San Francisco. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Central Trust Company of California. 

For the half year ending June 30. 1907, a dividend has been declared on 
deposits in the savings department of this bank as follows: On term de- 
posits at the rate of four (4) per cent per annum, and on ordinary de- 
posits at the rate of three and three-quarters (3 3-4) per cent per annum, 
payable on and after Monday. July l 1907. Dividends not tailed for are 
added to and bear the same rate oi interest as the principal from July 
1, 1907. B. G. TOGNAZZI, Manager, 

Office — 42 Montgomery street, corner (Sutter, San Francisco. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The German Savings and Loan Society. 

For tie- half year ending June 30, 1907, a dividend has been declared at 
the rate of three and eight- tenths (3 8-10) per cent per annum on all de- 
posits, free of taxes, payable on and after Monday, July 1, 1907. Dividends 
Dot called for ar added to and bear the same rate of interest as the prin- 
cipal from July l, 1907. GEO. TOURNY, Secretary. 

Office— 5^6 California Street. San Francisco. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The Hlbernia Savings and Loan Society. 

At a meeting of the board of directors of this society, held this day, a 
dividend has been declared at the rate of three and three-quarters 
(3 3-4) per ceni per annum on all deposits for the six months ending 
June 30, 1907, free from all taxes, and payable on July 1, 1907. Dividends 
not drawn will be added to the deposit account, become a part thereof, 
and earn dividend from July 1st. K. M. TOB1N, Secretary. 

Office — Cor. Market, McAllister and Jones Sts., San Francisco. 

San Francisco, June '11, I'.mi;. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
The Scandinavian Savings Bank, Chronicle Building, Market street. 
For the half year ending June SO, 1907, a dividend has been declared 
at the rate of 4 per cent per annum on term deposits and 3 3-4 per cent 
per annum on ordinary deposits free of taxes, payable on and after Mon- 
day, July 1st, 1907. 

L. M. MacDONALh, Cashier. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
The Italian -American Bank. 
The Italian-American Bank, 518 Montgomery street, corner Commercial, 
lias declared a dividend for the term ending June 30, 1907, at the rate of 
four (4) per cent per annum on all savings deposits, free of taxes, and 
payable on and after MONDAY, July 1, 1907. Dividends not called for 
are added to and bear the same rate of Interest as principal. 

A .SBARBORO. President. A. E. SBARBORO, Cashier. 
Office — 518 Montgomery street, corner Commercial 




$£§a ?5^®9i©^ 




Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast. 




VOL. LXXIV 



San Francisco, Cal., July 13, 1907 



No. 2 



The SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor, Fred- 
erick Marriott, at 905 Lincoln avenue, Alameda, California, and at 773 
Market street, San Francisco, Cal. Telephone — Alameda. 1131. San 
Francisco — Temporary 3594. 

Entered as second-class matter, May 12, 1906, at the Postoffice at Ala- 
meda, California, under the act of Congress of March 3, 1879. 

New York office — (where information may be obtained regarding sub- 
scriptions and advertising) — 20G Broadway, C. C. Murphy, representative. 
London Office — 30 Cornhill, E. C, England. George Street & Co. 

All social items, announcements, mining, commercial and financial 
news notes, advertisements or other matter intended for publication, 
in the current number of the NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA AD- 
VERTISER, should be sent to the Alameda office not later than Thurs- 
day morning. 

Schmitz would have the jail the legal city hall, but it 

won't work. 

The Yosemite stage robber's press agent must be a dandy 

in his profession. 

Wellman's North Pole airship will not start as adver- 
tised. A new leak in the gasbag? 

So many subpoenas are offered Rockefeller tb.it be ought 

to have theni ai wholesale prices. 

Tbc gentleman from Australia, .Mr. Squires, mighi make 

a good farmer, bill never a bruiser. 

The .lime demand I'm' brides lias lapped over into duly, 

notwithstanding sun spols and hot weather. 

Glory lie until Texas forever and forever. She bus beaten 

tbr plumbers' trust. Almost a superhuman achievement. 

"Less than the shadow of a rimless cipher" i- the latest 

measuremenl of Fairbank's chances I'm- tbr nomination. 

This is the difference: Tennessee sends a tiddler to the 

United stairs Senate and San Francisco sends one In jail. 

lapan now knows yellow journalism and political jingo- 
ism, and oh. int. what a dose "f them the Tenio is gettingl 

The Presidential band-wagon i- going -low these days. 

The passengers are a little afraid of being bold up by Japan. 

The ticker continues to tick, notwithstanding the strike. 

Public scniiiiiciii is bigger than tbc disgruntled telegraphers. 

When compared to the public land grafting company, the 

San Francisco grafl ring stands as a prairie bill docs io a whole 
range, of mountains. 

Five rows of teeth an' a good mam for thai twelve-year- 
old \>w York boy, bu one of the character- 
isl ics oi this . ountry. 

Lawyer DRrrow suggests that Harry Orchard be made 

President of Roosevelt's Ananias club. What's the matter with 

Harrow taking the JO 

Walter W'ellman thinks be has discovered tbc one route 

to tbr North Pole, but what bothers bini is his of dis- 

ing the back track. 

A Russian scientist. Metshnikofl, writes most learnedly 

mi "How i.i Preserve the Human Life." 
out of Russia. 
Tbc ice is said to be inciting on Mars. Perhaps it is 

due io the beat arising from the friction between certain clans 
to "redeem and saw" San Fran 

Tbc nding pretty much all his time read- 
ing a book on "The S ' ith. or the 

- may be Put." 

bandit made the mistake of his lib 

- no diffen 
the subject was in commai Moroccan army. T 

commerce in Morocco that John Pull wants. 



Did you ever notice that the weather is always remark- 
able for something or other? 

Have faith. San Francisco is getting there, and will be 

twice as big and ten times as good. All that is a sure thing to 
bet on. 

And now comes an English chemist, who says that alcohol 

can be made from peat for six cents a gallon. "Show me. I'm 
from Missouri." 

Mark Twain makes King Edward's sides ache from 

laughter, but no one thought of lese majeste. Edward is not 
built that way. 

Just wait and see what kind of politics will emerge from 

the District Attorney's office — and shun it as you would the devil 
when you see it ! 

A nineteen-year-old Nebraska boy has eloped with his 

step-mother. No doubt she reserved a mother's right to do a 
little spanking when needed. 

And so Ambassador Bryce has offended the President. He 

failed to agree with Roosevelt on the question of what consti- 
tutes ;i first class Stale organization. 

When aerial navigation is in shape to do business, it will 

be line fun watching sheriffs rushing through the air "trying 
Io catch up" with defaulting bank cashiers. 

When one reads the comments of Eastern newspapers "in 

San Francisco, our wonders if anj g 1 would ever come of 

sending missionaries to such a benighted people. 

Portugal is figuring on overthrowing the monarchy ami 

establishing a twentieth century republic. A big job for tenth 
century intelligence and Erst century superstition. 

They say Roosevelt has sent Hitchcock, of the Post Office 

department, to scour the country to End out if tbc people reallj 
want him for another term. I Barkis is willin'." 

A loo] of a fellow at .1; -low ii js trying to organize a 

c posed of lineal . - at tin- 1 le- 

claration of Imt r .- Bah ! 

There is too much tlap-doodle talk in labor and Henev- 

Sprecki I iside and give common sens 

honest] of purpose a chance to put San Francisco on hei 
The Bryan-Hearst fight for the epaulefc oi the 

party is pretty sure to end in the elimination of both, and thus 
save tbc ubl Guard from death by the contamination of evil as- 
ion. 
They say 'bat Schmitz has an incurable disease. When 

averse in Greek we call bis ailment "the itching palm," 

and that there is really no cure for it. but it may lie held in check 
by incarceration. 

Carrie Nation thouf hatchet work in San 

Francisco graft circles, but - do up the Pitts- 

burg millionaires tirst. May the smell not go beyond the smut 
mills of the town. 

I Ohio judge who "continued" a murder 

until the next day io allow the jury to attend a ball gam 
friend of flu The "game" most have the right of way. 

whati 

With twenty Yank. more than as many 

cruisers of ! a hundred or mor 

irpedo bos ts, lined up on the 

. no doubt th-re wi!! mprovement in busii 

aid and private ship-yards. It is a sudden i; 
Of llt'.i I in popula 




SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 13, 1907. 



IzMttfriai Ckmmwt 



in helping the community. The time for some radical, positive 
action by the community at large is rapidly approaching. Once 
in a great emergency this town rose to the occasion, and there 
has been no need until now of a Vigilance Committee. 



Schmitz has been convicted and sen- 
Conviction of Schmitz. fenced. It is a subject for con- 
gratulation, bui to exult over the 
sentencing of Schmitz would be out of place. Schmitz is a crea- 
ture of circumstance, and too weak to deserve the attention of 
any one engaged in the dissection of character. The endeavor 
of the whole community should be to forget his existence, and 
also to forget that the public is, as a whole, responsible for the 
fact that he now occupies the position of a disgraced ollicial. It 
is a most humiliating spectacle, and a debasing thought that 
a human being has deliberately despoiled himself of name and 
honor because society has not chosen wisely when looking for 
timber of which to make a Mayor. The News Letter has often 
spoken of the fact before. Schmitz was a political misfit. He 
never truly represented labor. He was, by birth and training, 
a hanger-on to the aristocracy, lie never represented the aris- 
tocratic element to which he never truly belonged, except as a 
parasite. lie is just a great big man. with but little delicacy of 
Eeeling, with wrong ideas of right and wrong. He was intended 
by nature to fill some humble and useful position, but fate and 
Abe h'ucf willed otherwise. Schmilz's indignation is undoubt- 
edly genuine. He does not realize that he has done any wrong. 
Ill- mental equipment does not allow him to see things in any 
other than an egotistical vein. You cannot make a silk purse 
out of a sow's ear. 



In the present, condition of affairs 
Evils of THE Btg Stick, in San Francisco, a public journal 
cannot be true to its duty unless it 
speaks out clearly and plainly. In the exposure of graft, and 
in the effort to improve the moral condition of the management 
of the city's administration, the prosecution has not only the 
sympathy hut the support of every good citizen, but it is likely 
to undo much of the good that it has accomplished by its hand- 
ling of the difficulties that have arisen in connection with the 
conviction of the Mayor, and the confession of the Supervisors. 
All this talk of "a Big Stick" is no! helping San Francisco, is 
not settling the difficulties thai confront us here, is not restoring 
confidence in the future. Without discussing the motives which 
may actuate the men who are behind the prosecution, it is un- 
deniably true that confidence is no! being restored as it should 
be, unless it is the intention that the city is to be irretrievably 
rained. The banks are not loaning any money; building opera- 
tions are not being pushed ; prosperity is not being encouraged. 
So doubt a large portion of this uncertainty, of this unrest, is 
due io the action of the labor unions, but labor unions strike in 
oilier town,-, even in New York: they make unreasonable de- 
mands, and yet there is not the lack of confidence that there is 
here. The lirst thing Io do i- io give the city an administration 
which will mean Men every citizen shall have full protection to 
go hi- 1,ih ful way, and that honesty and patriotism are to control 
its affairs. Note that wo say honesty and patriotism. It is per- 
fectly possible to have an honesl administration, and yet to have 
a failure. Whoever is Mayor should be a man who cannot be 
suspected of having any personal interests to serve while holding 
the office. No one must suspect that the new administration, 
when it comes to granting franchises, for instance, is actuated 
any more by the "Big Stick" than by cash bribe. 

The public welfare must lie the sole consideration. So far as 
the interests of San Francisco are concerned, the city must have 
no boss, whether he be Abraham Ruef or Rudolph Spreckels, and 
no one affiliated with either of those men or with any other fac- 
tion or interest is the man of the hour. 

There are too many signs of petty jealousy on all sides. There 
are too many men intent on beating the other fellow rather than 
on saving the town, and the result is deplorable. Even one, rich 
and poor, is suffering from this warfare. In a time of unexam- 
pled prosperity, in the country at large. San Francisco is Suffer- 
ing depression. Why? Because of the earthquake or the fire? 
Not at all; but because the men at the head of affairs are not 
showing themselves equal to the task they have taken upon them- 
selves. They are more interested in defeating their rivals than 



Wab and Rumors 

of War. 



It is an astonishing fact that the 
statesmen who edit the daily news- 
papers will most cheerfully publish 
a vast amount of news that is, in the 
main, the pipe dream of some Occidental or Oriental jingo, some 
one that has never smelled powder, ami who, under no circum- 
stances, could be induced to leave the seclusion and safety of a 

e fortable office td look on such a war-like performance as a 

memorial day parade. These editorial statesmen are of the 
stripe that scorn and deride the State militia, and who indulge 
their small brains in devising petty annoyances for army and 
Davy officers. These jingo writers have never so much as given 
live minutes of their time to military duty, and therefore can 
have no idea of doing anything without reward or for patriotism 
only. All editorial writers are not of this stripe, but all the 
writers for the California press arc of the kind that knows abso- 
lutely nothing of world politics. They have the most meagre 
knowledge of the policies that dictate the actions of European 
Governments; they possess little or no knowledge of the geogra- 
phy of Asia, and have no sort of idea of conditions in China and 
Japan. To these small minds the Olienl has never awakened; 
there has uever been any improvement in the condition, mentally 
and physically, of the people of the near coast of Asia, and all 
endeavor to treat with these Asian people is to be on the basis of 

treating with a spoiled child, either by ll BPer of some sweet 

hum I as a bribe or bv the thival of chastisement, forgetting that 

the Orient is out of swaddling clothes, lusty with the pride of 
centuries, and the knowledge of the strength of numbers. The 
newspaper statesmen know about as much concerning the Asia 
of to-day or yesterday as they do about patriotism, and their 
knowledge of patriotism is on a par with their endeavors to 
create markets for the wares of an essentially commercial nation 
in the Orient by embroiling themselves in unnecessary rows 
with every community from Siberia's dreary wastes to tropical 
Jolo. 

Right in line with the insane movement for war. the news- 
papers publish Ibis week as a Government document a resolution 
of the Progressive Party of Japan to the effect thai the said 
party is to make the light for control of the political destinies of 
the country on the basis of the creation of political thunder by 
a general attack on the United States, incidentally demanding 
the repeal of the exclusion clause. Ear from being a Government 
utterance, this particular cablegram refers to something that 
has as much to do with Government policy as a prommciamento 
by WBlliam Jennings Bryan or Eugene Schmitz. A careful read- 
ing of the document did not reveal anything like what the lying 
headlines intimated, lite same day began the publication of 
jingo utterances, endorsed and magnified by malicious editorials, 
by people never heard of before, including preachers and college 
professors. All these people were in favor of war. Not one in 
ten had ever shouldered a musket, and not one out of a hundred 
ever will. 



No one but a soldier realizes thai 
Wab is Hell, war is hell. It profits no one. There 

is a deep significance in the fact that 
the attempt to embroil us with Japan is so insistent. War is of 
no beiielii to any one. It would cost much less and be productive 
of better relations with all the people of the Orient if we would 
turn our attention to the task of keeping San Francisco out of 
the public eye, and by devoting our surplus energies to develop- 
ing commercial relations with the Orient by peaceful and square- 
deal methods. 



Japanese and 
California Farmers. 



California is a great stale with a 
great future. California has not 
enough laborers to develop that 
future as far as its agricultural 
features arc concerned. We know the past wonderful perform- 
ance and the future possibilities of the great mines of the Golden 
State; we have heard of the shipping that call be developed into 
a world commerce, radiating from its splendid hays and inlets, 



July 13, 1907. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



ami we are told thai the beaut; of the State, its attractions 
tn the seeker for health and recreation, will eventually build it 
up as one of the greatest of all in the Union. Not one of the 
factors mentioned will ever develop the State beyond the nor- 
mal growing conditions of other favored communities, and it is 
upon agriculture, the development of the farms, the chicken 
ranches and the agricultural sections that California will, and 
really dues now, depend for rapid and permanent abnor- 
mal development and a still more glorious future. All of the 
mercantile wealth, all the manufacturing interests, and all of 
the mining depends upon agricultural advancement and the 
welfare of the rural Californian. 

The great cities of the State depend on the advancement of 
the small agricultural settlements for any advancement the 
cities may make in the future. This fact is realised by the. 
great financiers of the land, and it is acknowledged that the 
territory to be drawn from must be gridironed with electric and 
strain lines. The day has gone by when one large corporation 
could pursue the narrow-minded policy of dictating that no 
other transportation company might apply for a right of way 
in California. The State is being rapidly covered with a net- 
work of railroads. In the South, in Los Angeles County, in- 
tercommunication is almost perfection. You may reach the re- 
motest corners of the county by rail. Los Angeles, through a 
liberal policy toward corporations, has opened up a country 
that is magnificently large in proportions and marvelous in 
variety of productive possibilities. Los Angeles, through its 
splendid equipment with electric and steam lines, reaches north- 
ward into Tulare and Ventura Counties, and plucks trade from 
the merchants of San Francisco. There is agricultural pros- 
perity in the Southland. 

It is the small ranch that makes Los Angeles County and the 
adjacent counties prosper. The people of Los Angeles, who were 
once accused of living on climate and consumptives, and of hav- 
ing no other claim to recognition by the world at large, arc a 
very peculiar people, and in one sense they rise head and shoul- 
ders above the San Franciscan. This is the sense of one-ness 
of purpose. They are all for Los Angeles. 



I !rop Failures and 
Bad Times. 



Long ago the community decided 
One-ness of Purpose. for itself, through the wisdom of 

the shrewd business men who have 
made of the City of Angels a metropolis, that in order to per- 
manently prosper there must be bark of Los Angeles a large 
agricultural settlement. Every inducement was offered the 
small farmer or rancher, and in twenty-five years from now 
there will not be au available foot of land within fifty mile? 

circuit nf I. us Angeles untilleil, and the large In I ha\< 

entirely disappeared. It is safe to say thai without the he-lp of 
the Chinese and the Japanese labor, this would have been an 
utter impossibility, or at least so slow of accomplishment as to 
retard development for fifty years. The Asiatic has made il 
possible for the small farmer to prosper, and the small farmer 
has made il possible lor Los Ancles to become a great center 
of distribution, and. unexpectedly, a place of manufacturi 
of the largest cities on the Pad 



Bad Ti mis on the 
Pacific Coast. 



It is a well-known fact that the 
Pacific Coast has never suffered 

. bad times unless i - agricul- 
tural production was limited by one 
or another cause. The Coast is apparently not influenced by 

uses i ha, go to create bard times in St. I, mis. Chicago 
Or Slew York. Rather is the reverse the fact, and crop failures 
in California. Washington and Oregon create disaster a: 
Bin een 

Need of labor to gather the crops has often resulted in short- 
age in delivery and consequent losses, and in Northern Califor- 
nia llie insane reviling of the Asiatic has resulted in short 

if this kind. It is difficult to secure hands enough, from 
the hop-fields of the North to the vineyards and the raisin farms 
OJ Kern, to bring in the beaw returns nature has 
the Californian who scratches t!i of this land of plenty. 



It is true that we have, in recenl 
years, bad other causes besides 
shortage of help to blame for small- 
ness of crops, and various diseases 
have devastated the orchards of California. This state of affairs 
has resulted in two-third crops, but the evils thai beset the ap- 
ricot, the pear, the cherry, peach and apple orchard are being 
quickly eliminated, anil the fact, that crops have been short 
have been rather more of a blessing (ban a curse because of the 
fact that, even under the conditions of a disastrously short crop, 
the labor is not at hand to gather the fruit for the market. The 
solution for all these difficulties is a reliable white labor, and 
if this labor is not avaUable, then let us employ the only avail- 
able element at hand, ready to furnish the help, the Japanese 
and the Chinese. The white labor, of a reliable sort, is pre- 
ferred, not through any sentimental reason, but because of its 
superior strength and quickness, and its greater intelligence. 
In California we are face to face with the fact that white labor 
will not take up the burden of farm work. It is a practical im- 
possibility to induce white men and women to leave the cities 
to take up the work in the country districts, and this is particu- 
larly true of that part of the State that is commercially tribu- 
tary to San Francisco. In the past, reliance has been placed 
on the Chinese and the Japanese. With the natural growlb of 
the cities, there is a correspondingly slower development of the 
country. This means more mouths to feed in the large centers 
and a greater demand for what the country produces, with a 
correspondingly increasing lack of labor to gather the crops and 
a still more crippled condition as regards the delivery possi- 
bilities of the agricultural community. 



Stupid Laws and 
Prejudice. 



This brings us almost immediately 
to the idiot ie restrictions placed on 
the Japanese more particularly by 
the Municipal Qovernmenl of San 
Francisco. The News Letter is mil a believer in the policy of 
giving the Japanese or mnj ulhcr foreigner, advantages that 
would not be given to a citizen of the United States, especially 
a native-born American. At the same time, the News Letter be- 
lieves that the on'.y practical way to ensure a continued prosper- 
ity in the California rural communities is to make il possibli 
for those communities to easilj obtain the necessary labor to 

garner the crops at. harvest time and to make the fj 

for the next fiorison ami fruiting, krrogant San Fran 
ever since the days of Kearny, of the sand-lots, has said that 
this shall not be. and now. I it with the of the 

land, from which it obtains tance, it is taking 

. nol a- an indi\ i.lual. but 

as a race, to face a barren sea. By every n 

a malignant bunch of i 'al degenerate-, con- 
fessed bribe-taki rs, candidates for i : 

e taken to make trouble between the United 
States and Japan. The latest insult offered to Japan is the re- 
fusal to issue to Japanese pei pen employment 
-. This refusal, on the one hand, cripples the farmer 
wlun he most needs help; on the other band, angers the people 
of Japan, and incidentally strikes San Francis 



fornia is rich enough to make 
- FOB rut: it an obji 

EASTERNER, farmer by offering a bonu«. The 

new-comer from an 

munity. say east of t: ,; from ta 

for a period of three years, and 

acquire land, not as a right by h kind, 

but as a reward and fn always 

providing this he surrounded by the pro- 
vent speculation by U - 
shouh n numbers in such i 

- • 

but the lab v.Jl. 



Californi i's Great li.i 



For years California has suffered from the fact that not only in but all over the 

there has been an ii - ' of intei a - n the 



ry for 
help : irld at large the marvelous bounty Natur. - ungratefu 



SAN FKANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 13, 1907. 



®0 IKmrat? % Kmmtwx !mj 

#1,500.0011 iFunii to be lExpfttfrb in fflamtal ©raining 



Industrial peace in the true and commonly accepted meaning 
of the words is declared to be the object of a campaign of educa- 
tion inaugurated by the National Association of Manufacturers 
by President James W. Van Cleave. 

Mr. Van Cleave says that the association has no desire to 
create a solitude aud call it peace, nor will it. as a preliminary to 
an attack on labor unions, "cry peace, peace, when there is no 
peace." Mr. Van Cleave says that he uses the word "peace" 
in its plain meaning, without reservations, qualifications or 
emendations of any sort. He writes the article, he says, for the 
purpose of clearing the public mind of many eroneous impres- 
sions created by inaccurate or perverted reports thai may have 
gone abroad of the platform adopted by the association at its 
last annual meeting. In the article he says: 

"Peace,. Not Labor War. 

"The association, at its convention of May ">'M. resolved to 
instruct its officers to establish and finance a council to serve as 
a means of harmonizing and federating the various national 
and State organizations of citizens, merchants and employers, 
to the end of utilizing them in a vigorous educational campaign 
in the interest of industrial peace and mutual good will. 1 told 
the convention that 1 thought that $500,000 a year, or there- 
abouts, for three years, would be needed to make the work of the 
proposed council effective. This suggestion received the con- 
vention's unanimous approval. 

"Here is where some of the newspapers erred in interpreting 
the purpose. They said the $1,500,000 was intended as a war 
fund by which we aimed to crush the labor unions. Nothing was 
farther from my thoughts. And 1 think 1 am safe in saying 
that such a thing did not enter the thoughts of any member of 
the association which adopted this programme. 

"Fraternity and Equality. 

"In our plan of a federation of all the associations of citizens, 
merchants and employers of labor in every held, national and 
.Stall', each organization, while preserving its independence as 
absolutely as at present, will eome into co-operation with all the 
other organizations in a great council, in which each will have 
a voice and in which all will meet on terms of fraternity and 
equality. Each organization, as now. will deal with the issues 
affecting itself solely, and the federation, through its council, 
will handle all the concerns common to all the associations. 
These concerns are not only large in magnitude, bin they are 
large in number. All the organizations represented in the coun- 
cil will go promptly to the defense of any of its members which 
need assistance. But in order to command this aid. the member 
assailed must be lighting for a principle favored by the council, 
and be fighting by methods and with weapons which the council 
recognizes to be just. 

"In each State we propose to have a carefully selected com- 
mittee to look after local legislation in the interest of industry 
and progress. These committees will report to the council, and 
will work under the council's direction. We will have national 
committees, in which all sections and all association* and inter- 
ests will be represented, to concern themselves with the great 
questions before Congress, or which ought tn be placed before 
Congress. 

"Train Boys at School. 

"Our ultimate and permanent dependence for .-killed labor, 
however, is in the American boy. We must attach a manual 
training department to all our public schools of the primary 
grade, and industrial high schools, also free, into which boys of 
fourteen or fifteen who have taken the course in the primary 
schools may enter for advanced and practical instruction, and 
from which they can be graduated as thorough mechanics. The 
object of this manual training in the public schools is to supply 
the need created by the labor unions' virtual abolition of the 
apprenticeship system. 



"1 wish to call the attention of our good friends of the daily 
press to what 1 have just said, and to whal 1 am about to say. 
I lie federation and its fund will work for peace and not for war. 
I wish also to call their attention to the fact that, the resolution 

of the convention of the National Association of Manufacturers 
which declared in favor of the federation expressly set forth that 
the federation and the fund which would finance il are for the 
purpose of making a 'vigorous educational campaign, 5 and for 
making it 'in the interest of righteous industrial peace and of 
mutual good will.' '"' 



CALIFORNIA VS. EUROPEAN WINE. 

California wines are becoming recognized everywhere as the 

only pure wines served. This superiority "f ■ wines mer those 

of France is graphically illustrated in a cartoon by McCntcheon, 
in the Chicago Tribune of June 12th. 'I he cartoon is a series 
of six pictures showing a typical Chicago society gentleman, with 
his equally typical wife, at dinner in a restaurant. In the first 
picture he calls for the wine list, and the waiter ask- if he will 
have French or California wine. The second picture depicts 
the excessive rage of the corpulent gentleman, as he shouts: 

"How daie you suggest California wine to '" Then comes 

the inspection of the label on the bottle, and the Chicago con- 
noisseur ejaculates: "Ah, tint's the stuff — Chateau Yquemical." 
Then follow the scenes of drinking the wine, the series closing 

with a picture of the stout gentleman in his home with his wile, 

she still expressing her indignation because thej lee! I d asked 

to drink California wine, while he is gazing with an expression 
of horror al the scare-headlines of his daily paper which tell the 
fact thai much French wine knows no grape, and is a strictly 
hemical product. 

The moral of this cartoon is, that California wines ami 1 1 1 . ir 
purity are well known, while French vineyardists find that they 
cannot compete with chemists, and consequently are going out 
of business. The buyer of California wines knows what he is 
drinking, and the people even of Chicago have learned that there 
is something better than going by a label when ordering wine. 



Georgia has, in the last week, done much fo remove the 

stigma attached to the Suite, whether rightly or wrongly, on ac- 
count of tin- lynching of negroes for crimes committed on 
women. Dalton, Georgia, has hanged a white man for just BUcll 

an offense as negroes have suffered capital punishment. 'Tis 
well. 



If 




CHAS.KEJLUS& CO 

EXCLUSIVE 

HIGH GRADE CLOTH ! ERS 



No Branch Storei. No Agents. 

"Making Clothes History"— we claim that distinction. The class o f 
productions we've been offering lately developing this industry have 
placed us on record. Vou don't experiment when you get clothes here, 
as we are "exclusivists." 

"fit you like paper on the wall" methods have been expuaned and cremated by high- 
grade apparel dispensers. This modem clothe* education so profurely prcmulgalidby 
shops that are in our class have amplified the telling and lining of clothes to men who 
never before even attempted to try. This shop is certainly a revelation. 



KIjNG SOLOMON'S HALL, 

Fillmore Street, near Sutter, San Francisco 



July 13, 190? 



AND CALIFORNIA \DVERTISER. 



Hi MMste ©IT IF®ir®ikini AiMirs 



The Situation in Europe and the Fur East. 

The action of the commercial bodies of Japan concerning the 
refusal of San Francisco to renew permits to Japanese to con- 
duct employment agencies has created a disquieting impression 
at The Hague, and its influence may be far-reaching in inter- 
national affairs. The school question was Dot nearly so threat- 
ening, for it was well-known thai Japan forced it to the front 
to make America define its interpretation of the treaty of 1894, 
Iml with no intention of pressing the issue beyond the point of 
diplomatic adjustment. That was the hand of the Japanese 
Government playing a game for still larger advantage. But al- 
though the Government may lie the instigator of the action of 
the commercial bodies, it does not appear so on the face of 
things, and for that reason the situation is all the more uncer- 
tain. It must he remembered that "commercial body" does not 
mean in Japan what it does in this country. The commercial 
bodies of Japan include the banking, the manufacturing, the 
railway, the shipping and the foreign and domestic interests. 
In short, the commercial bodies include and represent everything 
in Japan except social life, politics and the open policies of 
the Government, and it is impossible to believe that such 
powerful organizations have no influence in the conduct of the 
affairs of State. In fact, the business interests of Japan exert 
more influence "at court" than in almost any other country, 
and when the several commercial organizations meet and assume 
a position that implies a threat against the commerce of another 
country, it may lie taken for granted that they have something 
more than the Government's sanction — its hearty approval. It 
is from this stand-point that The Hague is viewing the situa- 
tion, but it dare not take official note of il. II may, however, 
let the possible consequences influence the delegates in dealing 
with international questions of a general character, 'the word 
cornea from Japan that these commercial bodies are likely to 
inaugurate a commercial boycott against the United States un- 
less permits are granted to their countrymen to conduct em- 
ployment agencies in this country, but be i~ not well informed 
on the real meaning of it all who believes I bat the commercial 
bodies care a rap whether such permits are granted or not, or 
whether applicants for them drop dead or live on. h is absurd 
to suppose that a whole nation would work itself almost into 
spasms over the refusal of a Foreign nation to grant leave to one 
of its countrymen to conduct an agency tor the purpose of secur- 
ing employment for those who might want to work for wages. 

Headers of the News Letter Who ha\e followed I he weekly 

analysis of international affairs, will remember that this very 
art of the commercial bodies has been i cast several times in 

explaining the deeper meaning of I he reeonlh negotiated treaties 

between some of (he Siaies of Europe and Japan. Events will 
surely show that not. only Japan is back of these commercial 

bodies, but England, Russia and France also, and the n 

win- they should be so is plain. As lo France, we 
discriminating against her in commodity interchange, and to 
add insult to injury, we have just eo» signed a reciprocal tn 
with Germany for the importation of German wines at greatly 
reduced tarifl dune-, and flatly refuse to give France the same 

advantages. 1 is because of this snubbing lliat French wine- 
makers are in rebellion against the Government The French 

wine-makers, or alleged French wines lo the value of about 

$18,000,000 annually, are exported to the United States, while 

the German exports arc immaterial as compared with the volume 
from France. Hut our refusal to grant France reciprocal trade 
in injures the French wine-makers in another way. and 
which way inflicts the greatest injury upon them. All! 
the apparent wine exports lo this country have a valui 
$18,000,000 annually, they are worth little or nothing intrinsi- 
cally. The bulk of our French wine imports is manufactured 

out of anything but grapes, and at a small cost. This wine 
can be exported lo this country and pay the high customs duties 
and have an enormous profit left, while the pure grape wines 
cannot be produced and pay the duly at a profit What Fiance 
has demanded for a lonf ciprocsd treaty that would 

allow the vineyardists to cultivate their ground at a profit by 

ing the tariff duties; meanwhile the French Government took 
measures to place a tax upon manufactured wine, whicl 

her with reductions in our customs duties, would restore the 



French wine industry to its former position as a gainful occu- 
pation. Naturally, the French Government is not rery friendly 
to us; besides, the outlook in the Far East for commercial ex- 
pansion at the expense of the United States is too encouraging 
to fail to stand in with Japan and the recently negotiated treaty 
of commerce and for defense and offense between France and 
Japan provides for French supremacy as to the United States 
in Asia. 

Russia would give the commercial bodies of Japan full bin 
covered support in their schemes against this country, for Rus- 
sia wants no American competition in Northern Manchuria, and 
Japan wants none in her part of Manchuria or Korea. All this 
is provided for in the Kusso-.Japa.nese treaty. The British-Rus- 
sian-Japanese-French treaty provides for mutual protection lo 
their respective territorial possessions in the Far East and for a 
division of flic commerce of the East, together with joint 
supremacy in the politics and the commerce of China, especially 
as against the aggressiveness of the United States and Germany. 
In view of these facts, he is not wise who sees a war with guns 
between the United States and Japan in the near future as the 
result of good, bad or indifferent treatment of a few citizens of 
Japan in San Francisco. It is to be fierce war, but for com- 
mercial supremacy, and Great Britain is not only the Field 
Marshal, but until Japan and Russia and France have built up 
a merchant marine service, British ships will supply all needed 
transportation facilities, and her full share of British-made com- 
modities. This is the whole story of the situation in the Far 
East, and it explains why Russia, England, France and Japan 
are opposed to any very extensive reduction of their armaments. 

Holland, which, next to England, controls the greatest num- 
ber of acres of outlying territory and subjects, is ill at ease over 
these recently formed combination. Her East India interests 
are immense. Java alone has a population of more than 25,- 
000,(1(10, and aside from tile managers of her interests and a lew 
thousand other people, the entire population may be said to 
work for almost nothing in tin' way of wages for Holland. Of 
course, Holland would prove loo weak to resist either one of 
the nations that is in the combination lo absorb the commerce 

of the Far East, and to have a lot to say in the matter of tin' 
"New China" policy both political ami commercial. And not 
one of these great and important issues will The Hague dare dis- 
cuss seriously. The four nations in the combine want no war or 
wars, but they do want the commerce of Asia, and the commer- 
cial bodies of Japan are parties to the schi 



THE LITTLE PALACE HOTEL. 

The musical programme that is rendered at the Palace is one 
of the many attractions of this most popular hotel. 




ONE PIECE 
COLLAR BUTTON 

No sharp edges to cut the neck. Easy 
t6 button and unbutton. Always stays 
buttoned. Can't, break in service. You 
get, a new one FREE if damaged from 
any cause. 

' r«ll*d pkrta. or p>M. s.l-l *T 

Uftdinc jiw rin * »n.J ti»l ■! ilirtni Collar 

■ r • a. ■ • • I . 

KREMENTZ & CO. 

21 Chestnut Street,. NEWARK, N. J. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 13, 1907. 



Soaring Sitifra 



There is no city in the world which has such a variety of res- 
taurants as San Francisco. From the cheap ten cent "feed 
joint 7 ' in Chinatown, where the drift-wood and wrecks of human- 
ity dine, to the palatial resort where the so-called elite hold 
sway, with all the delicately classified intermediate grades, San 
Francisco has a full representation. 

It was to one of this latter class that Henry Gibson repaired. 
After eighteen years of hard work on his ranch he had amassed 
sufficient to live upon, and was entering upon a period of 
enjoyment with 'he satisfaction that he had fully earned it. 

As he entered the gorgeous place, walked softly down its 
heavily carpeted aisle, and noticed the snowy-clad tables bur- 
dened with silver and cut glass, he felt young again, and won- 
dered how he had ever forced himself to submit to the priva- 
tions of the past. 

It was nearing midnight, and the shining lights of this world 
new to him were seated at the different tables. The detective, 
clad in the height of fashion, following perhaps some present 
clue, the sport who has been lucky at the races, the gilded 
youth, flushed of face and bright of eye, the bookmaker loud in 
voice and clothes, the poetaster enjoying his one good meal of 
the week, the professional man for once mentally relaxed, and 
more important than all, fascinating woman clad in Worth's 
latest creation, passed in kaleidoscopic review before hU 
while the sensuous music stirred his emotions in a manner new 
to him. 

He seated himself at a vacant tabic, and as the waiter, silently 
yet with Chesterfieldian grace, received and served his order, 
he felt that it was good to live. Yet a certain melancholy oc- 
cupied him and refused to be banished. He thought of his 
mother, dead prematurely with the strain and worry of providing 
for a family: of the father, still living in the quiet village; of 
the sister who had left home long years ago, and of the brother 
who was even now in the Alaskan wilds following the golden 
will-o'-the-wisp. 

He also felt that he was awkward, bizarre and uncouth amid 
this courtly multitude who, after a casual glance in his direction, 
paid him no more attention. He looked at the waiter with a 
challenging glance as if to discern a sign of levity, but the man 
was impassive as a graven image. Many of the guests were now 
leaving, as the hour was long past midnight. The proprietor, 
a little pugdy Frenchman, noticing the thick roll of bills he 
had carelessly displayed, approached and made himself agree- 
able in broken English fur a few moments, and then bowed him- 
self away. 

A little later, as Gibson was discussing his lobster a la New- 
burg. and sipping the wine that cost him live dollars a bottle, 
he felt vaguely that he was being scrutinized. Glancing around, 
he beheld a lady who appeared to bis exhilarated senses to be 
the materialization of that ideal which every man has pictured 
in fancy. 

Introductions are not very formal or hard to obtain in a 
French restaurant alter midnight, and a few moments later the 
two were seated together. 

The champagne tent him an aplomb and a courage surprising 
to himself, and as the vista of the long years of hard work Eaded 
away into nothingness, he felt a pitying contempt for his horny 
handed associates of the past, with 'their simple life, their long 
hours and their hard toil. Suddenly his gaze was riveted by a 
plain gold ring which shone dully amidst a half dozen brilliants 
on her delicate hand. 

An association of ideas with a vanished past, a retrograde 
movement of memory to the time of twenty years ago, and a 
sensation that he stood On the brink of an abyss, held him in 
its grip. 

"['lease let me see that ring?" he pleaded huskily, "I admire 
it more than all the rest," and his fair companion, divining with 
the intuition of the sex that something unusual was the matter, 
hesitated. However, she finally consented, ami as he nervously- 
gripped it, the inscription, "M.'G. from ,7. (i.." though worn and 
almost undecipherable, burned itself in his brain. R was his 
mother's wedding ring. 

A flash of recognition passed between them, an appalling truth 
became evident, the fumes of champagne were dissipated as by 
.in unseen hand, and brother and sister stood in the limelight o'f 
self-accusation. The next morning he returned to the ranch. 

— The Caliph. 



A 

FITTING 

FINALE 

TO A 

GOOD 

DINNER 




A 

FITTING 

FINALE 

TO A 

GOOD 

DINNER 



LIQUEUR 

PERES CHARTREUX 

GREEN AND YELLOW 

This famous Cordial, now made at Tarragona, Spain, was 
for ctnturies distilled by the Carthusian Monks [Peres Char- 
treux] at the monastery of La Grande Chartreuse, France, 
and known throughout the world as Chartreuse. The above 
cut represents the bottle and the label employed in th« put- 
ting up of the article since the Monks'expulsion from France, 
and it is now known as LIQUEUR PERES CHARTREUX 
(the Monks, however, still retain th« right to use the old 
boitle and label as well) distilled by the same order of 
Monks who have securely guarded the secret of its manufac- 
ture for hundreds of years and who alone possess a know- 
ledge of the elements of this delicious nectar. 

At first-class Wine Merchants, Grocers, Hotels, Cafes, 

Batjer & Co., 45 Broadway, New York, N. Y. 

Sole Agents for United States. 



Alaska-San Francisco Route 



TO 



NOME AND ST. MICHAEL 

DIRECT 



INDIANA 

3335 TONS - - - GRAHAM. MASTER 



SECOND SAILING FROM SAN FRANCISCO, JULY 15, 1907 
tyMaking four round trips direct during the teason. 



FOR FURTHER INFORMATION APPLY TO 



tE&o barneson-hibberd CO. 



1 72 EAST ST. 
SAN FRANCISCO 



SOMETHING NEW 

MORAGHAN'S 

RESTAURANT AND BUFFET 

24-26 ELLIS STREET, NEAR MARKET 



July 13, 190?. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 




'HevdcCntrtybodx'tknljiHUiotiT' 
'Que <Ul will /Jay Ox denl^ir, vilhpnL 



The murder of young Maguire is an illustration of the 

oft-repeated statements of the News Letter that San Francisco 
is in a state of insurrection. Maguire was murdered by a gang 
of toughs, who have always managed to elude punishment. They 
are well-known to the police, and could easily be rounded up, but 
the same wireless connection is at work, and the same pull is 
keeping them out of the clutches of the law. If Dinan had any 
desire to do his duty, the whole gang would be in jail in three 
hours. Dinan is busy doing politics, and keeping out of jail, 
and he needs this lawless element to help elect his friends to 
office. Maguire's murderers will not be found. It is significant 
that the first action of the police was to release one who was 
caught at the scene of the crime, followed by a systematic cloud- 
ing of all evidence in the case and the wilful losing of all clues. 

The mendacious writers who pen the editorial thunder 

for the morning newspapers are afflicted with rabies when it is 
the Japanese question that confronts them. In the course of an 
editorial in the Call on last Tuesday, one of these writers makes 
several statements which are deliberate untruths. The Crier 
points out that the Japanese are not quarrelsome nor do they 
make quarrelsome neighbors. Evidence from haters of the 
Japanese may easily be had to this effect. It is not true that 
they seize on any pretext to make "every real or fancied slight 
a cause of international friction." Japan has, as a nation, com- 
plained once and only once. Japan, as a nation, will probably 
complain again, as in the case of the employment agencies, if 
the rights guaranteed its citizens by the treaty are again in- 
fringed. Tile Asiatic in San Francisco is the most peaceful, 
industrious of all the elements that go to make up a most re- 
markable hodge-podge gathering of the scum of the earth. 

The trouble with the writers is, thai they muel earn their sal- 
aries by the sweat of their imagination, and like the Mission 
district tough, they find the Japanese the most convenient victim 
upon whom to vent (heir spleen. As a matter of Eact, the Japan- 
ese pay a higher rent than the while man or Chinese. They run 
no hills, never address a remark to any one unless first spoken 
to, and then, generally, refuse to answer. They work as well as 
they know how. They are eager to learn to do better. They are 
never insolent. Our most ignoranl white element (and the sub- 
scription lists of the daily newspaper is largely of this element), 
resents all of the above characteristics. The Call writer should 
remove himself to some alkali waste, and build a fence around 

himself, where he inai nol hear, smell or see the human kind, it' 

it happens to he yellow "' brown. Seriously speaking, it ' 
no good i" bear false witness, It may do much harm. 

So Mr. Schmitz offers himself for the Mayoralty. Do 

you laugh f Lei me teU you this, and be silent, that you may 
hear, it Mr. Schauta could gel out of jail, he would run for 
Mayor and be elected by the same men who elected him before. 
The man who has so Ear forgotten himself as to vote with that 
gang once would a \ bo again. And if 

s, limit, does escape San Quentin, 1 donl know but I'll vote 
him myself. It would serve him right, and the decent p< ■ 
of this ii f, under those circumstances, he did get 

office and disgrace upon as. '• inds, 

Eugene seems a ■ ep his equilibrium; be has no fear of the 
penitentiary. And if his sentence is much longer deferred, his 
liopes will have something to justify them. I am net 
belie incarceration in the penitentiary till he is in 

the straited uniform peculiar to that institution. 

On Tuesday, the Mission broke out again in one of its 

ines of riot. The S - a lot of h 

luins who have always tlourished in thai ..mated around 

nth and Eighteenth and Sanchez and 1' 
the passengers on the - - with the vilest obscenity, 

in em one car, No. 1587, and only took 
inductor and motorm 
This an hour, 

■red on the scene, while - 



'Way down in San Diego there lives a man who knows 

how and when t<> do the righl thing. His muni' does not appear 
in the accounl of an incident reported to have taken place at 
our aouthern-mosl city. It seems that the man in question is 
over eighty years of age. His age does not seem to stand in his 
way when it comes to using his fists. Sam Bigleman, a man 
who is identified with the Industrial Workers of (he World, as- 
serted that he had no respect for the American flag! He made 
his assertion in the following language : "No, I don't owe any 
allegiance to the American flag. It is a dirty rag." Their was 
no room for argument and no time for flight. The octogenarian 
patriot launched out with a big, horny fist, and Mr. Bigleman, 
socialist, I. W. W., Western Federation of Miners, took the count. 
That G. A. R. veteran must be a corker, for the despatch says 
Bigleman went to the ground with both eyes streaming with 
blood. The News Letter's Crier would like to shake hands with 
the old patriot. May his tribe increase ! 

Another instance of labor union agitators completely 

showing their hands occurred last week, when the labor union 
members of the industrial peace association withdrew and made 
it known that they did not view with favor a conference having 
for its object the maintenance of industrial peace in this city 
for a number of years to come.' Industrial peace is the very 
thing the labor leaders do not want. It would throw them out 
of their fat jobs. They would have to work. They thrive on 
agitation, and they would not have peace for anything in the 
world. 

Even a child might marvel at the simplicity of the labor 

union agitators who instantly took to themselves the appellation 
of "the as yet unwhipped mob" which General Funston so ac- 
curately used. It was as clear a case of guilty conscience as ever 
was seen. No law-abiding, respectable citizen regarded himself 
as referred to by the General's words. It was the real un- 
whipped mob, the law-defying labor unionists and anarchists, 
like Tveitmoe. Cornelius and Furuseth. who thought immedi- 
ately that the cap fitted them, and it did. It was comical to 
uhsm-ve how completely the unwhipped nml> gave itself .iway. 

Seldom has there been seen in any of our criminal co'irts 

such a hard-looking collection of thugs as the eight carmi 
other unionists indicted for assault with a deadly weapon and 
with conspiracy in connection with trike. Tin \ each 

and every one of them wore the hang-dog, brutal, furtive ex- 
pressions that are typical of the hoodlum s They were 
certainly a tough-looking hunch as they were rounded up first 
in Judge Lawlor's ind then in Judge Cook's court. 

A mo i I jhteenth and Sani h 

week, and when the car sped by, threw rocks, pieces 
of iron and holts through the windows, endangering the liv'-s 
of thi the Hying missiles and bro 

Luckily, do one was seriously hurt A policeman Btood a block 
riol was nol on his 



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after many years of use. still retains an unapproachable value. 
Musically considered, it preserves its original freshness and 
volume of tone. 
D. H. BALDWIN &. CO . 1569 Van Ness Ave.. Cor. California 



SAX FKANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Jdlt 13, 1907. 






X^b«w«- - 



, v ' - . *S 



"You know," said a negro witness to Superior Judge Melvin 
in Alameda County the other day, "this has been the longest 
racing season we've ever had in Oakland." 

"I don't know anything about the racing season."' retorted hi- 
Honor: "but to tell the truth, I was under the impression it 
continued the year round. There seems to tie a goodly crop 
of suckers born every day." 

* » * 

"-Much fun is made of the way the Oakland police department 
is conducted." said a prominent resident of the City of Oaks, 
the other day. "But if it is any more poorly managed than 
the Street Department, even though I'm not from Missouri, 
you'll have to show me. For instance East Fourteenth street 
has just been macadamized. During the past few weeks, the 
contractors have had their heavy rollers at work packing down 
the rock and crushed stone. Just at the time when the street 
was beginning to get into such condition that a loaded wagon 
could be hauled over it without having the wheels of the convey- 
ance sink to the hubs in the loose gravel, along came the laborers 
of the telephone company, who commenced excavating for the 
purpose of putting in a conduit svstem. Xo one blames the 
telephone company, it is simply doing something which will 
aid in improving the city. The blame is upon the Street Super- 
intendent and the Mayor. Why in the name of common sense do 
not these officials ascertain what is to be done before they have 
the street put into condition:' But then, what is the use of ask- 
ing a question of that character?" 

* * * 

''Gentlemen." interrupted Judge Melvin the other day. while 

two lawyers were endeavoring to make themselves heard al i 

the sound of Oakland's hideous lire whistle, "kindly refrain 
from trying to speak while this municipal nuisance is continu- 
ing. It seems indeed strange that this court must suspend 
business while this whistle is blowing, yet it has always been 30 
and still continues." 

While the Judge did not so express himself, any one who heard 
his words could easily understand that he would have liked very 
much to have added: "And will probably continue until Oakland 
ceases to cling to village ideas, which seems well nigh impos- 
sible." 

* * » 

District Attorney Boyd, of Marin County, deserves all credit 
for the war he is waging upon the betting establishments at 
Sausalito. The task is all the more difficult "that he has the ac- 
al of the town officials, who are owned 
and soul by the bra • who manage these ne- 

fario .- -.. (.me Pistolesi, who is at once town trustee and 

County Supervisor, - ly active, and should he -oppressed 

with an iron hand. Men such as be has shown himself to be 
are a discredit to any community, and the decent citizens of 
Sausalito should lose no time in calling meetings .1 uing 

the hands of the District Attorney, [jet them make no mistake: 
they cannot have a decent and orderly town, they cannot expect 
the patronage of decent and orderly people, thee cannot expect 
home-seekers to take up = among them.' if they will en- 

courage ami foster open gambling. 

The fight in favor of decency in Sausalito must not be con- 
fined to that town alone. All .Marin County is interested in the 
contest, and in the driving from its shores of the disreputable 
places that have so long disgraced Sausalito. San Rafael, Mill 
Valley. Ross Valley are all interested in suppi .,■ places, 

In that way purging the ferry boats from the disreputable 
horde which at certain hours daily infest them, during the weeks 
when the gambling dens are in active operation. There is no 
more beautiful part of the State than Marin County. There is 
no more desirable suburb of San Francisco, and the people who 
live there are. as a rule, among the most decent and orderly 
in the State. The one blot on the fair name of the county is the 
-alito pool rooms. Wipe them out. 

The voters of the county and town of Sausalito should lose 
no time, when the opportunities offer, of getting rid of the men 



SIS! 



j^rK***-^. 



If 

^kT* HARTSHORN 
M SHADE ROLLERS 

WW Bear tlie script name of Stewart 

Mm Hartshorn on label. 

™ *• Gel "Improved." No tacks required 

Wood Rollers Tin Rollers 




who an/ trying to force these gambling dens upon the county. 
Pistolesi should be overwhelmingly defeated for any office to 
which he aspires. Nothing— after the suppression of the dens 
iii question is concerned — will do more to uphold the good name 
of Marin County than the permanent retirement of that friend 
of the gamblers to private life. 

» * * 

From several parts of the State come- the new- that when 
the militia were called upon to go into camp, their employers, 
in many cases, refused to grant |],|. m ,| l( , aecessary holiday. k\ 
San .Rafael, where one would naturally expect to see a broader 
and more patriotic spirit — the number of members of the local 
company who wen; refused a holiday for the purpose of t] 
campment was such that it seriously endangered the future of 
the organization. 

It is difficult to find words to adequately condemn the men 
who are guilty of such a lack of patriotism and even common- 
sense. Here we have the labor unions opposing the militia be- 
cause they fear it will interfere with their lawlessness and riots. 
and at the same time, the very men who would he the first to 
suffer, if disorders break out. refuse to inconvenience themselves 
to the extent of a little more pi rsonal labor that their men may 
>e prepared 10 right for the Hag when it is endangered. These 
employers are not possessed of the spirit that animated the men 
who shouldered a musket to save the union in 1861, noi 
of those who. as late as a decade ago, took part in the war with 
Spain. Their name's should he published, that every man may 
know who are the mercenary enemies of t)ie Republic, and who 
fear 10 In-,, a penny in its defense ami welfare. The, should 
be rigorously boycotted by every patriotic citizen, and made to 
feel that they arc the subjects of the contempt and disapproba- 
tion of every loyal American. 

• * * 

The authorities in Marin County are biking special precautions 

to prevent tire on and around Mount Tamalpais this (rear. The 

si penalties are being dealt out to am- one caught starting 

a camp lire or using matches or - km- carelessly, and this is 

as it should be. 

* * * 

So many buildings an going up in the various towns in Marin 
County that there is a general demand for building inspectors, 

and San Rafael and Mill Valley will probably appoint them - 




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July 13, 1907. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



Until a week or two ago, people who wished to reach Oakland 
by a transcontinental railroad line were obliged to buy a ticket 
to San Francisco. But at last, after a quai-tci' of a century, the 
Southern Pacific Railroad Company has accorded to Oakland 
an official place upon tlic railroad map. Orders were issued re 
ccntlv to (lie passenger ticket agents in California, Oregon and 
east of Sparks, Nev., to sell transportation direct to Oakland 
l.i travelers desiring to purchase it. The existence of Berkeley 
lias also been recognized officially. The chamber of commerce 
of Oakland secured this tardy recognition of their city after a 
conference with the leading officials of the railroad company. 

• * * 

A Sacramento lady of some social standing was recently 
placed in a most embarrassing position. In that city some folks 
pre-pay their gas bills by nlacing a twenty-uve cent piece in a 
slut In the meter. When the gentleman who makes the collec- 
tion came to Mrs. Blank's house to examine the matter, he was 
surprised to find therein a quarter with a hole in it which was 
attached to a string, evidently placed there to be jerked out 
again. The lady very blushingly pleaded ignorance to how it 
came there, claiming that it must have been done by some mis- 
chievous boy, to which the collector heartily agreed to relieve 
her embarrassment, although he chuckled to himself and 
thought it "the same old trick." 

• a * 

There is mi public road from Mill Valley to the Redwood Can- 
yon, and although hundreds of persons come to the valley and 
walk over to the canyon weekly, they may at any time be cut 
nil' from the road generally used, and across which several gates 
have recently been placed. It is proposed to ask the county to 
condemn and open a public road to the canyon. 

Thanks to the extreme precautions taken, and the strict ordi- 
nances forbidding the use of fireworks, not a Are occurred in 
Marin County on the Fourth, although the celebrations were 
larger and more elaborate than they have been for years. 

Returns just made by the County Assessor show an increase in 
the value of property for Marin county of $1,11 -1,897 over 190(i. 

* * * 

From Martinez, in Contra Costa County, comes the strangesl 
of strange fish stories! According to the tale, a fisherman, upon 
pulling in his line the other dav. found fastened to the hook a 
good-sized jug. After pouring out the water — unadulterated 
salt, water was all the fluid it contained — he was surprised to hear 
a noise issuing from the container. An investigation proved 
that a two-pound codfish had been imprisoned in the jug. To 
bear oul the story, it would seem that the fish had got into the 
jug while small, and before it could make its escape, had gTOWll 
too large to make its exit possible, This is surely a fish storv 
witli a salt flavor. Perhaps Ihe record has not been carefully 
kepi. but. so far as known, this is the first time that a two-pound 
codfish has been found in a jug. There are, however, a multitude 
of people who are willing to take their oaths that not infrequentlv 
during their lives they have seen snakes and pink elephants with 
blue trimmings issue forth I nun the little brown jug. But then, 
as Kipling i< ni'iii in BBVj thai is another story. 

• * • 

Evidently the streel car men in Oakland are opposed to giving 
loo great a sli. re of their hard-earned pay to a losing cause. If 
reports be true, the weekly contribution of each motorman and 
conductor in the City of Oaks to the strikers of San Francisco 
has been reduced from $3 to $1. 



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o meeting ■ Id July 3d, 

dividend of $5 per share on the capital stock ,•: the First National Bank 
California. <■ en ana afi 

msfer journi - rom Jutj *th to July »th. both dates 

Inclu^ J K. MOFFITT. Cashier. 



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10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 13, 1907. 




It is about time that the critic, who keeps most of the ammu- 
nition in his locker for a shot at the society girl, should put a 
bullet through the word "lazy." He peppers hi- diatribes against 
the -iii.ii i sel with "lazy," and punctuates his ordinary conver- 
sation with that same accusation. 

As a matter of fact, tin- word "lazy" is not in the blue book. 
Show me a society girl who is really lazy and I will prove to you 
that though she may have been bom to the smart set. her "lazy 
bone" long since put her out of joint with it. Why, this lazy 
girl so soon falls out of step with the strenuous life of society 
that her second season finds her mail thin and flat, while the 
postman is weighted down with invitations for the girl next 
door. This energetic creature may not improve the shining hours 
according to ethical culture standards, but she certainly crowds 
so much into them that it makes old Father Time dizzy to audit 
her account with the clock. 

Lazy! Ever since the morning stars first sang together, 
society women have been adjectived as leading "lazy, indifferent 
lives." Indifferent many of them may be to the sins and sor- 
rows and joys and pleasures of everybody not in their own "right 
little, tight little."' world, but lazy — never! 

Ring up a popular bcdle some morning after a Sreenway ball. 
Nine chances out of ten the maid will come to the telephone and 
tell you that Miss Marie has gone out to the golf links, or Miss 
Marie is riding horseback, or shopping in her automobile, or. 
taking a music lesson. Popular prejudice paints her in lied 
until noon, sipping chocolate and reading the latest French 
novel. As a matter of fact, you will be more likely to find the 
daughter of the butcher around the corner propped up in bed 
until noon, munching caramels and assimilating a trashy novel 
while "'maw" does the week's washing. 

The genuine society girl knows that laziness spells flesh, and 
flesh is the particular abomination of this attenuated age. Cush- 
ioned ease and cushions of fat travel hand in hand, and the 
society woman dees in trepidation from the penalty laziness must 
pay. If the demands of society, with its teas, dinners, balls and 
skating routs are not sufficiently discouraging to the accumu- 
lation of flesh, the society woman grits her teeth and goes in 
for athletics. 

Of course, there are women who go in for all sorts of 
cise, because they love the sport, but there is also a class that 
takes exercise with as little pleasure as the small boy takes 
medicine. There are several society leaders who are even fore- 
going their automobiles on their shopping expeditions. It's a 
vain world, my masters, but not a lazy one, as any one who really 
knows will tell you. 

While affairs in town have not gone with a hop, skip and jump 
this week, every hospitable country house has rocked with mirth. 
This is the month when the hostess with a country home plays 
Lady Bountiful to her less fortunate friends. 

Burlingame was the scene of much merry-making during 
these mid-summer holidays. Mr. and Mrs. George Cadwalader 
were guests of the Laurence Scotts. The Mountford Wilsons 
had with them Mr. and Mrs. Russell Wilson. These popular en- 
tertainers left Burlingame the end of the week for the high 
Sierras, where they are enjoying camp life with the Walte) 
Martins. Main- of those who went to Del Monte for the Fourth, 
whether golf or auto enthusiasts, or merely pleasure bound, have 
lingered on. Mr. and Mrs. Orville Dwight Baldwin have as 
their guest Mr. and Mrs. John MeGaw and their children. Many 
well-known Easterners are registered at Del Monte, and the sea- 
son there promises to be a long and merry one. 

Mr. and Mrs. .Toseph Tobin have recently written from Curls- 
bad, and say that they line mel many San Franciscans al these 
famous springs. The Waller Hobarts are also at Carlsbad, and 
find life there so attractive that they expect to remain some 
time. 

The Joseph Corvells have recently returned to their home at 
Fair Oaks from a two-weeks' pleasure trip, and have already be- 
gun to entertain their friends in their charming manner. Mrs. 
Coryell's hot-houses, which have attained some little fame for a 



profusion of beautiful and choice flowefs, are more resplendent 
than ever this summer, and the Fair Oaks guests return to the 
city literally laden with flowers. The S. E. Slades' lovely home 
at Fair Oaks has also recently opened wide its doors to many 
guests from town. 

Miss Lydia Hopkins is in the Yosemite. Although Miss Hop- 
kins has not yet made her formal bow to society, she promises 
to be one of next season's most popular debutantes. Her love of 
out-door exercise is making her enjoy every moment of her 
stay in the valley. 

Burlingame is sincerely regretting the sudden departure of 
Mr. and Mrs. E. 0. Bradley. Mr. Bradley has been the guest 
of Mr. Henry T. Scott at his Burlingame home since last April. 
He found California hospitality so delightful that he wrote for 
Mrs. Bradley to join him here, and she arrived a short time ago. 
An urgent business call from New York cut short their expected 
long visit. They have returned to their home in Boston, with 
the strong determination to return to California at some future 
day. 

Mr. and Mis. Nicholas Longworth are stopping in Yellow- 
stone Park for a couple of weeks, on their way to this coast. 
Their stay here will be very short, and probably those who have 
been planning to entertain them will he disappointed. The Long- 
worths are en route to Honolulu, and are expecting a delightful, 
if not a very lengthy visit, in the islands. 

Oakland society is a-tingle over the expected arrival of Prince 
Luigi Amedes, Duke of the Abruzzi. and more than one matron 
is burning the midnight oil. or rather electricity, over plans for 
the entertainment of this titled gentleman. He will be the 
guest of Senator Goorcro C. Perkins in his home at Palm Knoll. 

Miss Marion and Miss Gertrude Mills have gone to Carmel to 
spend the summer holidays, where they find they are among 
friends. Carmel certainly gathered together a goodly set of 
people last week at the fete held for the arts and crafts, and it 
looks as though Carmel will soon boast such a gallery as Del 
Monte. Besides the many popular military folk wdio attended 
from the Presidio at Monterey, Mr. and Mrs. William Greer 
Harrison and Miss Harrison, Dr. Arnold Genthe. Mrs. David 
Starr Jordan. Mr. and Mrs. Wickham Havens, the Misses 
O'Callaghan. the Misses Morgan and the Misses Pemberthy were 
present. 

Last week was "Golf Week" at Del Monte. Eight p] 
entered the qualifying rounds over thirty-six holes of the com- 
petition for the Del Monte Cup for men. the best score heinir re- 
turned by Douglas Grant of the Burlingame Country Club. The 
other entries were Tt. M. Looser and Professor R. F. Allardice. 
of Stanford University; Dr. L. S. Caldwell of Colorado Springs; 
J. S. Carroll of the Los Ansreles Oountrv Club; Admiral Trillet, 
of Pacific Grove: Dr. E. E. Baker and A. E. Splivalo, of the 
Claremont Countrv Club, and John Parrott. Jr.. of the Burlin- 
game Country Club. The winners in the first round of match 
play were Douglas Grant. A. W. Splivalo. Dr. E. E. Baker and 
Professor P. F. Allardice. A. W. Splivalo and Professor R. E. 
Allardice reached the final round. The Professor, aided by a big 
handicap, proved the winner by a big margin, and captured the 
Del Monte Cnp. A. W. Splivalo. the loser in the final round, 
won the trophy for the runner up. Four ladies took part in 
the competition for the Del Monte Cup for women, the winner 
being Miss Cornelia W. Armsby, who played from scratch and 
beat Mrs. Warner in the final round. Miss Armsby won the 
Del Monte Cup, and Mrs. Warner captured the trophy for the 
runner up. The Mixed Foursomes were won by Douglas Grant 
and Miss Bourn, who defeated the nearest couple by only a sin- 



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July 13, 1907. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



11 



gle stroke. Twelve players, making three Foursomes, took part 
in the event. M5ss Bourn won a silver Sower vase, and Douglas 
Qrani captured a spirit decanter ornamented with silver filigree. 

In the consolation handicap for men, John Parrott, dr.. proved 
the winner, returning an excellent score and defeating Admiral 
Trilley by a single stroke. The consolation handicap for women. 
was postponed, the regular contest in the Continuous Handicap 
Tournament being played on Saturday morning. 

The putting contest for ladies was not held last week at Del 
Monte, as on Wednesday afternoon, everybody was watching the 
motor cars as they arrived from San Francisco, Oakland and 
other places. 



FISH AND FOWL. 



The worthy gentlemen who keep French restaurants were in- 
strumental in exposing much that was rotten in the city's ad- 
ministration, and became immune through the construction 
placed upon their actions in connection with the extortions 
practiced by Messrs. Tiuef and Schmitz and their henchmen, the 
Supervisors. It was through the revelations, solicited from the 
restaurateurs by Heney and Burns, that it became possible to 
confess Ruef and to finally land Schmitz in the County .Tail and 
in a fair way to San Quentin. It is not supposed that there are 
many in the community who believed that the restaurateurs were 
not literally held up by the grafting officials. These men, it 
has been conclusively demonstrated, found it utterly impossible 
to do business did they not pay tribute to the grafting ring in 
control. It was just as much a hold-up as for an individual to 
go out upon the highway and cause a stage driver to stand and 
deliver the mail and treasure box and to finish up the job by 
robbing the passengers of their all. The jury recognized the 
justice of the claim made by the complainants, and the prosecut- 
ing attorney, and rendered a verdict accordingly. 

'flic prosecution, flushed with the victory gained by the con- 
viction of Schmitz, and because of the leverage the piecemeal 
confession of Ruef affords, now takes a complete change in its 
view of a similar crime of extortion because that crime happens 
to have been committed against, people who have in times gone 
by opposed the schemes of Mr. Spreckels and bis associates. Ex- 
tortion was practiced on the gas company in just as large or a 
larger measure as on the restaurateurs, and vet the prosecution, 
by a deft, stroke of the pen. transmute-, the crime of extortion 
into one of bribery, and holds the amity innocent and the injured 
guilty. This is a remarkable alchemy, and it is a sti 
flexible contortion of intellect that allows the legal luminaries 
of the prosecution and the extra-legal Mr. Spreckels to make 
the sudden change of front without bringing on prolapsus of the 
brain. 

Tt has not yet been conclusively shown that there has 
any extortion or that the gas company paid anj money, but it is 
entirely within likelihood that every corporation in San Fran- 
eise.i that desired a favor or a privilege, a franchise or permit, 
was held up. There ^i>r< not seem to be any room for doubt in 

Ibis mailer of extortion. Tt is not likely that a man like Ruef. 
who held up the while, yellow and bl I Mite for the mite 

be might take, as a percentage on the wages of sin. would stop 
at holding up a gas company or a street railroad corporation. 
The only problem that faces the prosecution is whether they can 
rail il /isli in nit, in Ih,' other I Tt is a manifest 

impossibility hi make the public ai large believe thai 

company's offii i 1 - IB r informer Ruef, and .01 bended knees 

ottered him thousands of dollars unless informer TJuef had. in 
bis pleasant, diplomatic way, sent them an intimation, through 
one of Ids familiars, that some aid be taken through 

the Bo pervisor banditti to make I npany come 

through. Everybody believes this to have been the case Will it 
be possible for ilie prosecution to disprove every argument made 
by Mr. Hcnev, in the ease of the restaurateurs upon whom he al- 
leged extortion had been practiced? Will it tv possible to dis- 
prove to this jury what was proven to the other? 



The Southwestern Securities Company and 

agency, Burr Brothers, Incorporated, in the pl.t 

of alleged doubtful vi Yorkers, has run afoul ">f the 

\ew York Sun. and the Sun - 

furthermost 

V>\ upon dealing stand or fall. 



A PROFIT SHARING CITY. 

Some time ago a great corporation conceived the creation of 
a big profit sharing city in the Orient, and a concession was 
given by the Russian Government for the city of Dalny. It 
will never be known whether this magnificent city, partially 
built when the Russians were conquered, would have been the 
success its founders had hoped. The profit sharing in the free 
city of Port Arthur was limited to those who were original in- 
vestors in the scheme, and it was the plan to build a city of large 
proportions, capable of housing one hundred and twenty-five 
thousand people. But that's another story. 

There has never been, as far as history discloses, but one real 
profit sharing city founded that showed the necessary energy 
and virility in the founders to ensure success, and that city is 
Leland, just below the Leland Stanford, Jr., University, on the 
San Francisco peninsula. 

The Leland Improvement Company was formed early in the 
year 1907 for the sole purpose of obtaining a suitable site and 
the founding and construction, in all its completeness, of a city 
which shall he ideal in character. 

Six million dollars will be required to complete all improve- 
ments and construct utilities contemplated at Leland. One mil- 
lion dollars alone will be required to improve its 37 miles of 
streets and boulevards, every street to be beautified as the parks, 
with palms, flowers and lawns. The public buildings, opera 
house, library, gymnasium and public baths, city hall and 
public schools are all to be of the highest type and character. A 
broad, beautiful boulevard extending one and one-quarter miles 
across the city's entire railroad front will possess a rare and 
tropical finish. Over $50,000,000 will be expended by three 
trans-continental linos of railroad on the peninsula near the 
Dumbarton point railroad crossing of the bay to establish their 
terminals near San Francisco. Leland will receive the early 
benefit of this development. 

Tin- company proposes to expend one million dollars or more 
toward the completion of all improvements during the ensuing 
year, at the expiration of which the company will return to in- 
vestors money invested in its shut,- with six per cent interest 
if il has failed in prosecuting improvements as promised- 

It was recently decided by the Leland Improvement Company 
urn- of the site by tlie building of a 
deep water canal to connect with the California Boulevard and 
the b 

Sewers ai between the lots 

never to disturb improved streets. 

Ml walks, a perfect water system, electric light and 

gas pi ictly up-to-date telephone nd an ante 

omnibus transit system will be installed: in fact, there will be 
nothing lacking to supplv comfort as well as ready and pi 
returns to of the company and ! 

The city of Leland almost joins the ca 
Stanford University, the highest endov, i) and 

'inest group of buildings in the world. 
The western branch of the Vanderbilt University of Nashville, 
Tcnn.. endowed for - 50,000 annuity, has 

I in Leland. In the center of a campui 

_!iinYcnt group buildings 

; which thi 
•pond during t! ! their completion. 

Sunday, the I tth. will He an Leland. 

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12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 13, 190T 



UDKFR ON 




'■ • : • &, > ." ■ i 1 » ■ - ■ . ■ . '* .".-. ' .- ■ -i ■ . . ' . ■ Hi 




"Throw enough mud, and some will stick." Pass enough 

statutes and we shall pass a g 1 one at last. The prohibition 

against fire crackers on the Fourth was simply immense — like 
Schmitz and Ruef's convictions, too good to be true. Bui it was 
true. Pope says: "We pity; then embrace." I" other words, 
repetition habituates us to anything, and we stand it. providing 
we are allowed to grumble. Usje seems to generate a sort of 
moral calosity. We are brought up to stand a certain ou 
and no one has the courage to declaim against it. If he does, 
he is voted a crank by the very people who are happiest I" sea 
some one lead the opposition. 

Why should patriotism demand noise? love of country, up- 
roar? respect for the flag, maimed children and waste of prop- 
erty? Our celebrating of this day is imperative: our manner of 
celebrating it intensely vulgar, totally unnecessary, and enthu- 
siastically asinine. 

* * * 

When will people learn that ridiculing the ridiculous is ridi- 
cule's only mission? The other day I saw a poor drunken 
woman put into the patrol wagon amid shouts of laughter from 
the crowd. T felt that I should prefer to be her than one of 
them. Two hundred years ago the court ladies of England 
made up parties to go to the BridgeweU to see the wretched 
women who beat hemp there, whipped. Think of il ! After 
the Bloody Assizes, in the reign of James II in England, the 
best people wen! io see young girls burned for giving food Pi 
Monmouth's defeated soldiers. To 7iie the fact that those from 
whom we are descended should have been such as they were is 
equaled only by the fact that their descendants are as decent as 
we are. Colonel Ingersoll .said : "In the first place, the vast pre- 
ponderance of water on this planet proves that raisin-' o( fishes 
would have been the wisest course." 

Ifin difficult it is to get beyond one's environment. Insanity 
consists not in believing in the new, but in advertising your be- 
lief. Advocating the unheard of has sent many a man to Bed- 
lam. The trouble with the pioneer is. not bis faith imt his 
fanaticism. About the poorest way to help the new is to call 
people fools for sticking to the old. An old absurdity fits com- 
fortably; a new truth has nothing to commend it but cold, naked 
fact, and when did man ever give up comfortable error willingly 
for unpalatable fact? 

Falsehood can't stand forever, but it seems to do so, to the 
poor devil whoso mission is trying to prove that everybody is 
crazy but himself. The old must lubricate the new if the now 
is to be swallowed. Christian Scientists keep this in mind 
when they borrow the prestige of an old faith to .-woolen a new 
science. 

* * * 

A graceful tribute was paid by numerous Japanese residents 
of this city on Fourth of July, when nearly every Japanese shop 
closed in honor of flic day. and draped both Japanese and Ameri- 
can fl:iL'- over the doors. Many Japanese dwelling- also bore 

the Stars and Stripes. How many Tveitmoes, Furuseths, Mc- 
Carthys and Corneliuses paid similar respect to the nation'e an- 
niversary? Those unbearable aliens never think of the flag ex- 
cept to curse it. Even the calloused newspaper reportei - grinned 
at a public meeting the other day, when Tveitmoe. from the plat- 
form, said something about "We Americans !" Faugh ! It is 
nauseating. 

* * • 

The assignment of Commander Reginald P. Nicholson to the 
command of the fine new battleship Nebraska will be bailed with 
great satisfaction by nearly every one in California, where Com- 
mander Nicholson has mad<= his home, and where he i- liked an I 
respected by all. Re has had several tours of duty on the 
Pacific Coast, and is justly regarded as one of the best officers 
in the service. He commanded the cruiser Tacoma. buill la 
this city, when she started on hoi' mai Ion voyage around to the 
Atlantic Coast, where she now is. Like his 'father, gallant old 
Commodore Somerville Nicholson. "Roggv" Nicholson is a model 
of courtliness as well as of nautical skill. 



While the naval personnel board may have been over-seven: in 
some, of its recommendations for compulsory retirements, it cer- 
tainly did well in forcing the withdrawal from active service of 
James II. Lull and William (!. Cutler. Captain Bull, "Johnny 
Lull." as lie is flippantly termed in the service, is one of the least 

petoiii officers in the navy, a striking example of the evils of 

the old system of promotion by seniority, regardless of merit. As 
long as Bull could scrapie through an examination for promotion 
an ! escape a court martial, be was sure io lie advanced, although 
a laughing stock to the service. As lor CommandeT Cutler, lie 
is one of the snobs of the navy, a petty tyrant, with about as much 
Mvutive ability as a rabbit. It was be who. while in command 
of the' cruiser Qalveston, treated bis excellent crew with such 
folly and -, rerity that most of them deserted al the first oppor- 
tunity, some of them even proceeding at once to the nearest naval 
station, surrendering themselves, and asking leniency, saying 
thai (bey liked the service, but simply could not endure Cutler. 
It is just such officers as these that do the navy more barm than 
all the line, capable, efficient ones can undo. They are good 

riddance. 

* * * 

Perhaps there has been no greai ir change than in the estimate 
of the old maid. A few years ago a woman's only mission was 
marriage. Every nose wae tilled at the bare mention of spin- 
sterhood. lie laugh, besl who laughs last, ami I suppose she 
does ioo. Time is mighty certain to bring revenge. Nowadays 
i sister who has escaped matrimony often thanks God for her 

esc: She has her choice of professions; u an loops tab 

on her goings ami comings, ami -lie keeps tab mi m n's. Of 

'oo. she was one whom marriage had missed; now she is one 
\\ hose iiidop nilonce atones for the thralldom she missed. A.gain. 
when the girl of the pasl reached thirty she was. if poor, matri- 

tlly damned. Now a woman who dolors marriagi 
thirty is considered wise. I know a girl who was married al 
thirteen. Now such nonsense would not be tolerated. Forty 
for a man and thirty for a woman is looked upon a — well, well- 

developed youth. 

* * * 

Every day we read items in the daily papers similar to the 
following: "Arnold Derago and Louis Mohr, non-union carmen 
in the employ of the United Railroads, were recognized last night 
at Twenty-fourth and Utah streets by pickets, who chased thein. 
The two men ran toward the bam ar this point, bul as the mob 
gained on them, they drew their revolvers and fired into the air 
to intimidate their followers. They succeeded iii getting away 
from the crowd, which returned to the pickets' headquarters, 

ai ross the street from the barn. The carmen wore later ar 

by policeman Burke, who look them to the Mission station. They 

were charged with discharging firearms in the city limits, and 
wilh carrying concealed weapons." 

Observe that the fleeing carmen were arrested — not the rioter-! 
The police made valient efforts to capture and prosecute tlie vic- 
tim- el' a cowardly assault by a mob of union thug-. No com- 
ment is necessary. But bow long are these outrages to be toler- 
ated? A dose of martial law would be beneficial to union hood- 
lums and a scoundrelly police department as well. 




The newest in belts— silk 
lined pliable leather with 
pearl buckle— in shades of 
gray and black. Also large 
assortment of other styles. 



Bullock & Jones 

Company 
Van Ness at. Eddy 



July 13, 1907. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



13 



Professor Somebody (or Nobody) says the American race ia 
dying out ; that we musl relj on foreigners to keep ap the nu- 
ea] strength. There are some people, generally the unmar- 
ried, who are always worried aboui a falling off in the census. 
Americans are not so prolific as formerly, but what children we 
have arc belter born ami better bred than any other on earth. 
The couple who an' responsible for only two children lack the 
irresponsibility of eight or ten. The Jew well eared for are what 
we want. Saving children is one thing; rearing them to be 
an hoiioi- to their country quite another. Quality, not quantity, 
is a maxim holding good especially in population. China 
.-.wanes with millions whose births were a curse; whose lives are 
a travesty on life. One time, for a period of five hundred years. 
the population of England stood still. Yet as many were born 
as before or -inn-. But more died. If we know anything, we 
know that a smaller birth-rate means a larger population. The 
eared-for lr\v, not the uncared-for many, should be our motto. 

Is there no law against promiscuous obscenity? Who has not, 
while in his house surrounded by his family, been shocked at 
the vulgar expletives of passing men and boys? Like our dust, 
we look upon this public, loud-voiced lilth as one of the few neces- 
sary draw-backs of San Francisco. Then there is the stamping 
grounds peculiar to hoodlums. These people never select a vacant 
tield. hut always some corner where live respectable people. I 
have known of complaints being made in vain to (be police, who 
went to a great deal of ceremonious questioning, copious out- 
flowing of threats and — nothing. Either we have a right to 
protection or we have not. The enforcement of the truant law 
would do more to cut down the harvest of future criminals than 
all the penitentiaries in California combined. Who can doubt 
that the midnight herding of children in streets is productive el' 
much future wickedness? 

* » » 

District Attorney Langdon is preparing for another flop! 

For the last eight months he has answered to the crack of the 
Spreekels' whip, and he has grinningly obeyed everj order trans- 
mitted to him by Heney. This is all to be changed. The day of 
the old rule is about over, and Heney, Spreekels ami the Illus- 
trious Fremont Older are to he kicked in the background, and 
from henceforth the Unconquered William Randolph Hearst 
will command the forces of the prosecution from his Sassafras- 
Scented Garden ai Sausalito. 

The poor and pitiful Langdon. as is (veil-known to every re- 
porter in the city, ieis been wailing and gnashing his teeth at 

the presumptions ami dictatorial manners of the ar« 
Heney. Over anil over again has he. Langdon, gone to thi re- 
porters of the daih papers, and complained thai Heney has been 
getting all the notoriety, ami while he is the boss, be is 
looked, ami Spreekels, be says, has al i ^ ^^ 
been nnkiml to him when he has been 
pulling the chestnuts out of the fire to aid 
him, Spreekels, in his revenge. Lan 
has declared, in season and oul of season, 
thai be is weary of being bulldozed in 

llenev . and he agrees with I'm n- 

llenc\ is insufferable, thai Spreekels is a 
damphool, and thai Older is a blowhard 
and an al are. 

Bui p l.ane.dnn. with a paucin 

of brains, with the courage of a 
and with the stigma of an ingrate fast- 
on his name, had nowhere to turn 
but had to take programme. All thing- 
are changed now. \\ illiam Randolph 
Hearst has come to his rescue, and Lang- 
don has made a deal with Hearst ■ 

Langdon, will tell Spreekels, Heney 
and Fremont Older to go to the devil and 
re-assert fa - the District 

-!. will see him 
through. This is what Langdon has prom- 
ised, and 90, in a 

Francisco will have the felicity of its Dis- 
trict ' taking a- 
bidding II 
- 

Bulletin will be 



Pears' 

"A cake of pre- 
vention is worth a 
box of cure." 

Don't wait until 
the mischief's done 
before using Pears' 
Soap. 

There's no pre- 
ventive so good as 
Pears' Soap. 

Established in 1 789. 



relegated to the old clothes' bag. 

Hearst is not a man to do things by halves. He has chafed 
long under the idea that the dearly beloved Examiner has had 
to take a back seat during all this commotion, and has bad to 

be satisfied with the stuff that has I n doled mil to it through 

the generosity of Fremont Older. II has 1 Fremont Older 

who has been sending W. V. Herrin to jail. It has been Fre- 
mont Older who has been the high chief of the prosecution party, 
while Hearst's high-salaried minions have had to light or flee, 
to keep out of jail, and all at the instigation of the said Fremont 
Older. Is it then to be wondered at that Hearst has come out 
here, has taken possession of his house in the Sassafras-Scented 

Garden at Sausalito. and will COl and the campaign/ 

With the District Attorney in the -addle, where is poor Henej 
to go ? where Spreekels ? and where Fremonl Older? 

h is whispered that with Hearst in power, there will 
might} 1 h iry thing. 



"Those Lustrous Byes are Murine Eyes." Murine Bye 

Remedy Mile- Dull Eyes Bright. Sick Eyes Well. So 
ne: Quii kl\ 1 ore- Ailing Eyes. An Eye 'I onii . 



REFRIGERATORS 



THE ALASKA 

Is universally conceded to be THE BEST in 
the market 

1000 

now in stock — 70 styles and sizes. Opal, White 
Enameled, Zinc Lined. Suitable for Families, 

Hotels. Restaurants, Cafes, and Boarding Houses 



W. W. MONTAGUE & CO. 

CORNER POLK AND TURK STREETS 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 13, 1907. 



PLEASURED 
mND 




" T^aberoo Ttaai/ but Pk&sumr ' 

"* —15oaXBoare — 

The theatrical manager is always a much overworked individ- 
ual, and this is about, the only apology any one can offer for the 
show put up at the Orpheum this week, it is heavily over- 
weighted with minstrelsy of the ebon-hued variety. There are 
niggers here and coons there, and it has only just missed being 
an all-black aggregation. As a variety, there . are two dan- 
seuse, I believe the programme calls them ""Parisian mo 
who do some wonderful pirouetting on their toes. For some rea- 
son, this is always a painful sigiit to me, and the fixed expression 
on the faces of the dancers generally confirms the opinion that 
they are suffering greatly. Lalla Selbini was the one "real good 
thing,"' and this was a relief. The show, including a bunch of 
good juggling tricks by Anita Bartling, a child, was a good one. 
My objection is merely temperamental. I cannot abide an 
abundance of coon! 

In theatrical matters at the Orpheum in the immediate future, 
for the week of July 14th to 2jsi, Mr. Benjamin Chapin, the 
young playwright, who made such a success of his "Lincoln," in 
which he appeared in the title role, will present a one-act play, 
written by himself, "In the White House." Mr. Chapin's char- 
acterization of Lincoln is a wonderful one, and as the character 
is the feature of both plays, M r. Chapin has thrown every en- 
deavor of his versatile brain into the portrayal. The Eastern 
press is very complimentary. Well — we shall see what we shall 

see! 

* * * 

Mr. Chapin has made the life and character of Lincoln the 
study of his own life, and men who knew the martyred Presi- 
dent and saw Mr. Chapin's performance, pronounced the resem- 
blance and the imitation of Mr. Lincoln's mannerisms and out- 
ward characteristics little less than marvelous. Among these 
was Mark Twain, who said there was "a living and a real Lin- 
coln before his eyes," and described the characterization as "a 
miracle." Mr. Chapin will be supported by his own company. 
Willard Simms, one of the most popular comedians the Tivoli 
ever had. and now a successful vaudeville Btar, will, with the 
assistance of Edith Conrad, a handsome and accomplished young 
actress, present the diverting sketch, "In Flinders' Furnished 
Plat." Another novelty will be Muller, Chunn & Muller, in their 
hoop-rolling act. which is unique in its way, and remarkably 
clever. 

* * * 

Ethel Barrymore has created quite a stir with her production 
of "Captain dinks'' at the Van Ness Theatre, and the house has 
been crowded to the doors al ever; performance of the fantastic 
comedy. The Clyde Pitch work is played to a nicety by the' 
star and the members of her supporting company, and prove one 
of the most relishable >•( entertainments. Theatre-goers here 
are admirers of .Miss Barrymore, and their admiration has been 
increased by her superb art in the interpretation of Trentoni. 
Everything is in keeping with the period, and the old-fashioned 
gowns, stage effects and introduced airs all assist in completing 
the perfect picture. The second and last week of Miss Barry- 
more's engagemenl begins .Monday night. There will be mati- 
nees on Wednesday and Saturday. The final performance will 
be given on Saturday night. 

* * * 

To write an impartial criticism of Ethel Barrymore is impos- 
sible — after you have seen her — for her personality forbids. You 
do not care whether she is an actress or not. She is charming, 
and you love her. That tells the whole story. 

But as to her acting, she may lay this flattering unction to 
her soul, that it is the universal opinion that she never acts. She 
simply lives over her own life, and so naturally that you forget 
she is on the stage, and dream that she is real. 

The rest of the cast contribute to her glory, as is to be ex- 
pected of them, with the exception of the boy who follows her 
lead, and is just a boy "as nateral as life." 

"Captain Jinks" is a misnomer for the play at the Van Ness 
Theatre. He is simply one of the many foils for her. The stage 
is empty Bave when she is there. And she steals the hearts of 



the whole cast, as she does that of the audience, so they do not 
mind being overshadowed by so amiable a star. She is such a 
""woman" throughout the entire play that any criticism of her 
would include the whole sex. 

Maybe she is deceiving the world, and has so forgotten herself 
in her part that she acts it as if ii were her own sweet self. This 
can only be decided when we see her do something else besides 
the naive ingenue. 

She soars to the tragic once, and you could see the thrill of 
every woman in the audience as she declares her intention to 
sing when her heart is breaking. This is the brave acl that ap- 
peals to the feminine heart, to "wear the smiling mask before 
the world." 

* * * 

Those who have witnessed the performance of "Her Lord and 
Master" al the Alcazar this week have enjoyed a very pleasant 

experience. The play itself a unts to very little. It is the 

story of an Anglo- American marriage, which i- only remarkable 
in that the wife is not the heiress of millions nor the man an 
aristocratic pauper, but while there is nothing in tin- play, there 
is very much in the acting, and charming and smooth perforin- 

- greel die audience. Herbert Kelcey, a- the English lord. 

leaves nothing to be desired. He is not an insufferable ass, nor 
an idiotic boor, as most stage lords are, but a quiet, well-behaved 
gentleman. Effie Shannon takes her part as charmingly as ever. 
and is as sweet and pretty as she can be, and gives full effect to 
her character. The rest of the cast gave a very efficient support, 
and were encouraged by liberal applause even before they had 
a chance to read their lines when they first came upon the stage. 
The Alcazar is keeping up the best traditions of that always 
popular theatre. 

* * * 

A play especially written for Mr. Herbert Kelcey and Miss 
Effie Shannon, by Clyde Fitch, and an artistic success wherever 
played, will be the attraction this coming week at the New Alca- 
zar Theatre. It will be that excellent society drama, "The 

Moth and the Flame," which has I n in the repertoire of Mr. 

Herbert Kelcey and Miss Effie Shannon wherever they have 
played in this country. The author first evolved the plot of 
"The Moth and the Flame" for a one-act play entitled "The 
Harvest," which was produced in New York at the Theatre of 
Arts and Letters, and scored an immediate success. "The Har- 
vest" was in one scene, the interior id' a church where a man iage 
ceremony between Edward Fletcher and Marion Walton was in- 
terrupted by one of Fletcher's victims. Jeanette Gross. The plot 
id' "'riie Harvest" was so strong ami appealed so to Mr. Kelcey 

thai he bad Mr. Filch write ar id thai one act two others, and 

the completed play was entitled "Tie' Moth and the Flame." 

* * * 

On Sunday night, the 21st, Ezra Kendall begins his engage- 
ment in the new comedy, ""Swell Elegant Jones," which was 
written especially Tor him by the author of his oilier success. 

"The Vinegar Buyer." 



— ■ — The Examiner has been hoist by its own petard. The 
Burns-Squires fiasco was the heavies! blow thai has ever been 
dealt the sporting page of thai unspeakable gutter sheet. Squires, 
the plug-ugly, was a protege of \V. \V. N'aughton, the -porting 
editor of the Examiner, who financed his trip to this country. 
NTaughton, so I am told, made a contract with Squires by which 
N'aughton should pay lh" transportation and receive ."> per ceni 
of the proceeds of the Squires campaign. The campaign having 
lasted about two minutes, there is weeping and wailing in the 
sporting rooms of the Examiner, and Naughton stock has fallen 
lower than ever, which is low indeed. — The Pat/. 



Miss Shirley, the brave Los Angeles school teacher, hit 

the nail on the head when she said the educators how to the 
school book trust. There is more graft in the text book business 
than in twentv Schmitzes and Paul's. 



POST AND LEAVENWORTH 

Becomes famous, since it is the location of the Little Palace 
Hotel. The grill is the great drawing card as it was in the old 
days. 



The Little Palace Hotel is now the center of attraction 

when luncheon and dinner is In be discussed. 



July 13, 1907. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



15 




Colonel Heuer, the eminent engineer, in writing of the cost 
of a satisfactory water supply for this city, is of the opinion that 
to buy the Spring Valley Water Works' system, and to carry 
through the Hetch-Hetehy proposition, would reach a cost of 
over ninety million dollars. 

* * * 

Mr. P. L. Hoadley, who was recently a visitor to this city, 
has been elected president of the American Insurance Company 
of Newark, vice Mr. E. 0. Doremus, deceased. 

* * * 

The Attorne3'-General of Missouri has rendered an opinion, 
holding that the recently enacted law affecting companies which 
pay any officer a salary in excess of five thousand dollars is 
valid. He is also of the opinion that the law does not apply to 
any contracts in force for this year. When the law is enforced, 
any life company paying any larger salary than five thousand 
dollars per annum to any official of the company, cannot do busi- 
ness in that State. 

* * * 

It is understood that the amount of loss on the eottoh mill in 
Oakland will not reach anywhere near the amount estimated. 

* • • 

The companies are still reducing their lines in the congested 
unburned district. One company is reported as cancelling about 
one hundred thousand dollars' worth of liability. The Rhine and 
Moselle is cancelling all the business it has on its books, and 

allowing judgments to accumulate. 

* * « 

The late Julius Jacobs, Assistant Treasurer of the United 
States, was among the old-time insurance men of this city. He 

was interested in an agency at the time of his death. 

* » * 

The International Association of Accident Underwriters held 
its annual convention at Frontenac, July 9th to 12th. So far 

as can be learned, San Francisco was unrepresented. 

* » » 

The Colorado National Life Insurance Company, which is 
about to enter California, has been admitted to do business in 

M issouri. 

* * * 

The Anti-Compact bill, and the bill creating a Fire Marshall, 
both of which were before the New York Legislature, failed to 
pass. States ".vnernllv are rci oimmviiw the need of a Fire Mar- 
shal] as a prevenl ive measure. 

» * * 

Mr. William J. Gardner, who was widely known in this city, 
when here, representing the liability departmeni of the Aetna. 
and who later was removed by the company to an advanced posi- 
tion in New 5 o] h l the parent - 

wife. He and family are at present in the Santa ( 

Mountains. 

* * * 

Two prominent ently married. Mr. 

John Shehan, of the Hem.' of New York, married an Oakland 
lady. Mr. (i. C. Fanvll. of the Preferred Accident Company 
married a Ross Valley lady. 

» * * 

Objections have been filed in the Circuit Court at ( 
protesting against the ninety thousand dollars allowed for fees 
to the receiver, and for legal services in the adjustment of the 

company's all 

* • • 

Nathan & Kingston, until recently prominent broker? in fire 
insurance, ha • ip. Mr. Kingston takes the 

bus Mr. Nathan takes a rest, and also a trip to Eni 

* * * 

Mr. T. B, Haldan, the » as re- 
turned from a Continental tour, and has moved ' rom 
f the Kohl building to the A] Ex- 
chai 



A loeal insurance journal for e has a bright line in it. It 

says: "Seattle: There's talk of the Empire Fire with an em- 
pirical capital." 

* * » 

Mr. F. W. Foulkes, of the I'henix of Brooklyn, has relumed 
to the general agency of the company at Chicago. The com- 
pany in this field is now without any direct home office repre- 
sentation. Prior to Mr. Foulkes's departure, he sold the busi- 
ness of the company on the Coast, which was satisfactory both 

in volume and quality. 

* * * 

The new buildings of the California and the West Coast Life 
are rapidly nearing completion. What has become of all the 
other projected new buildings which were talked of as about to 
be erected by the companies which own property in the insurance 
section ? 



A TRIBUTE. 



Mr. "Tom" Wilson, one of the most popular and successful 
business men of Tucson, at one time connected with the Xews 
Letter, as its chief accountant, died in Tucson last week at the 
age of 54 years. Mr. Wilson was the manager of the Tucson 
Lumber Company. He was a man of unusual cheerfulness of 
character, anil was remarkably amiable in disposition. He had 
been ill, but three weeks, and was not considered in any particu- 
lar danger when a change for the worse occurred and he passed 
away, Mr. Wilson's friends, who are legion in Arizona and 
California, mourn his death as a personal bereavement. 



The week at the Hotel Rafael is a record of enjoyment for 

all that are now sojourning at this ideal resort. The Rafael 
is remarkable in many respects. It is easy of access, and yet iso- 
lated. It is located in one of the most beautiful parks in the 
land, and yet every modern convenience is close at hand. It is 
without fogs or winds, and yet within 50 minutes of San Fran- 
cisco. Many San Francisco people are making it a practice to 
spend the week's end at this splendid hotel. The menu is excel- 
lent, the service is prompt, and every attention is given to the 
minutest detail in order to ensure the comfort of patrons. 



Cleanliness is nexl to Godliness, and clean carpets and 

ruga make a clean house. The Spaulding Carpel Cleaning 
\\ orks, ai 925 Golden I I i lasing 

the housewife in these matters. Thoroughness and promptness 

are their chs I Li 



-(Swain's Ba tlll-1113 Post mdez- 



i the elite. The shopping hour finds it crowded with San 
Francisco's fair sex. Ii man's luncheon place. 

Schlitz and Wurtzburger beer on draught. 



Van Ness Theatre 



CORNER VAN NESS AVE. 

AND GROVE STREET 

OOTTLOB. MARX A PO .. Piv>p* Mid Men. Ph«n« M»rk«t 600 

tins dcocI Mo rid and last week; matinssa v 

day and ■ 

ETHEL BARRYMORE 
in her greatest success, the fantastic comedy by Clyde Fitch, 

CAPTAIN JINKS 
Sunday, July SI— Ban Kendall In ' E nt Jonas," 



New Alcazar Theatre 



COR. SUTTER AND 

STEINER STS 
'TEI.Y "C r.ril.I'ING. Tel. West 6034 

BELASCO ,t MAYER. Ownen and Manacers. 
Commencing 

Sto, k Con HERBERT KKI.l'KV and MISS 

EFFIE SHANNON it ■ ty drama, 

THE MOTH AND THE FLAME 

to tl: mar day and Sunday. 

To follow— THE IDLER. 



Orpheum 



UUS ST . FtAR F1LLMORI 
Atwetatelf Cimm A 

r.-iln B ' - ( 

matinee. July 14th. M 
day. 

THE PRIDE OP VAUDEVILLE 

- 

■ 
last a nita Bartirng, the famous European 

: 

vs and Hoi 
Phone, West 60O0. 




Studebaker car, which made perfect score in the. endurance The second event was for runabout? of twenty horsepower and 
run. This car foul- pari iii the first event. under, and the distance two miles. The Franklin, was the 

winner in 3.1 J/. The above pieture shows the Thomas car. sec- 
ond in 60 mile race. 




The runabouts competed in the sixth event. This was for 'This picture shows the start of the fourth event, which was 
&4 h. p. and over. Ten miles. Was won by the Pope-Hartford won by a Molme car. 
in 1%.J$. Bert Dingley at the wheel. Photos by News Letter Special Artist 



WINNERS IN THE AUTOMOBILE CLUB OF CALIFORNIA MEET GY1 




A 100 yard dash and stop at 50 yards, slop engine, take off The Molme Car, Wilson at the wheel, winner of the fourth 

your coat, turn it inside out, put it on, start engine and finish. ere.nl. This event WOS for three miles, and the cheerful party 

50 yards, was Hie third event. This was iron by the Franklin, hear witness to their success. 
Time. IS 3-4. 





wJfc. 


J 


* v C^^^_. i^y 


tw~ . :Br^M^ 


psi 






'f 


_.*vM 






The tenth event was a touring car 

miles. Winner of Del Monte Cup barred. Won by 
the Packard in 6.1$ 1-:. 



A T runt iii the eighth event. Ti<- 

Time 

'■-',. Max Host n/< Id 



NA GAMES AM) HUES AT DEL MONTE TRACK, JTJLY ITH, L907 






Gee whizz! bul there was fun at Del Monte when the members 
of the Automobile Club of California held their meet over the 
Fourth of July. The sporl began a little after day-break on 
Wednesday morning, Jul} 3d, and did Dot finish until the even- 
ing of July 5th, when the last ear completed the fiftieth mile of 
the stock ear distance contest. Ami what a lilting finish. An- 
nther world's record Eor California. The time of one hour and 
one minute made by the six-cylinder Stevens-Duryea lowered 
the previoue record mad.' some time ago in Philadelphia over a 
two-mile track by two minutes and nineteen and one-quarter 
seconds. The whole meet was reflected in that finish. Never 
in the history of the club was there such a record attendance. By 



needed a room but to cdean up and get a very few hours sleep. 

Saturday the caravan began to depart for home. Most of the 
automoliilisls went by way of Santa Cruz, and before noon the 
hotel people of that place wired to Del Monte that the automo- 
bilists had taken all the rooms in town. Even in the face of 
the telegram, many went over, taking a chance of getting a 
place to sleep. 

The fun began at 7.1S on the morning of the third of July, 
when Arthur B. Watson, chairman of the runs and tour com- 
mittee in K. H. Pease's big Packard, was sent off as the pilot 
ear of the endurance run. He was given fifteen minutes start, 
as he had to stop at San Jose and Gilroy to see that all the offi- 




Big "Six" Stevens-Duryea (50 miles in Gl minutes), returning [rum Del Monte with seven passengers (via Boulder Creek), 
? per rent grades; 10 per rent steeper than the Fillmore street hill. 



the night of the third, the hotel at Del Monte hung out the sign 
"standing room only." The motorists who had not reserved 
rooms had to go over to Monterey for sleeping accommodations 
Then word came from that place that all the hotels were full, 
and the Del Monte people had to send' their patrons over to 
Pacific Grove. This place soon announced that there was no 
more room, and those who appeared lace went around hunting 
up friends asking for the privilege of having a cot set up in their 

But with all this crowding, every one seemed to enjoy himself. 
Principally because that, there was so much doing that no one 



cials at these points were on hand. Then those who had entered 
the endurance contest were sent off under two minutes' headway. 
About S a. m. a Moline, the official car, with P. P. l'Homme- 
dieu, the starter, took up the run. The last ear did not hold 
to the programme and make the hour stop at Gilroy. as the 
starter had to reach Del Monte before the first ear got to the 
finishing line. 

When the official circular was sent out by Watson, it was 
looked upon as a joke, for there was nol an owner of an automo- 
bile but what knew that to make Del .Monte in seven hours and 
twelve minutes running time was the easiest thing possible. It 



July 13, 1907. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



19 




Del Monte Hotel, with autos in front. 

was a schedule planned for a little under twenty miles per hour 
as allowed by law. 

They were given 3 hours and 54 minutes to get to San Jose 
an allowance of 6 minutes was made for registering without 
penalties, but as the cup went to the driver of a car that came 
nearest to the fastest time allowed, it was seen that time had to 
be made to capture the cup. From San Jose to Gilroy, the time 
allowed was 1 hour and 30 minutes, with a leeway of 6 minutes. 
The roads between these two places were ideal, and it is the 
course where the time to Del Monte is made. But by the sched- 
ule the cars had to keep the same pace as to San Jose. 

When the automobilists were resting at Gilroy, they com- 
menced to study the time they had to make on the last leg of the 
course. They win 1 allowed 2 hours and 30 minutes to get in. 
It was then realized thai Watson had handed out a lemon. To 
covet Hi. it distance, it meant some very fast going on the level 
stretches. San Juan hill had to he negotiated. An accident, a 
puncture or a stop of a very few minutes would make it impos- 
sible to get into Del Monte on time. 

Of all ilif cars that started^ only three touched each stopping 
point on the second allowed. Those who made perfect scores 
were G. Arbuckle in a Winton. .1. II. Kagal in a Studebaker, and 
Air. Newman in a Peerless. 

Lasl war there were thirteen perfect BCOres, and every one 

wanted the cup. To Bettle the matter, the cup was given back to 
the club and the thirteen took certificates. This year the Runs 
and Tours Committee decided thai Borne one had to get thi 
and the three shook dice for it. M p. Arbuckle, who is out on the 
coast representing the Wintons, won. 

The races on the fourth were interesting. The five mile con- 
Lesl for the Del Monte cup was the main event. The cup had 

been « ince by Max Rosenfeld in his Peer] and he 

.iiuc down prepared to make a hard battle for it again. He 
put up a splendid race, and won out by having his ear in perfect 
condition. It was tuned up to the proper pitch, and covered the 
five miles without a skip. It was a popular victory, for Rosen- 
feld, made a splendid showing. 

Dingley in a Pope-Hartford runabout showed class when 
the ten mile race for runabouts took place. The Packard and 
the Moline. a new car to he seen on the track, also captured 
races. 

Friday there was a lull in the sport. The owners of autom >- 
biles spent the morning taking a i|uiet ride over th 9 
Mile Drive. After luncheon, every one went over to th. 

he big fifty mile r:u e. It was scheduled to start at 
twotthirty, but it was nearly four before the seven cars were sent 
off to a perfect star;. It will be witness 1 

it will never foi .. be drop of the I ' _ 3tevens- 

Durvea went to the front with the fast Stearns close up. How 
the drivers of t! re did drive. Firs: one and then the 



other would lake the lead. The Stearns disputed every inch of 
the road. But soon the carbureter was not working right on the 
Stearns, and she commenced to drop behind, until the car had 
to be taken from the track, when it was found that the main 
spring in the carbureter was out of gear, and was -not doing its 
work. Temporary repairs were made, but the race had been lost. 
The Stearns, however, was sent over the course until the forty- 
eight miles had been covered. 

The Thomas Flyer seventy horse-power speedster took second 
place. The car was stiff, as it had only arrived a few days pre- 
vious from the factory, and had not been limbered up. Max 
Rosenfeld's Peerless car picked up a harrow tooth on the track 
and punctured a tire, so that a new one had to be put on. This 
caused a loss of nine minutes. Only for the accident, the Peer- 
less would also have been under the world's record. The Loco- 
mobile, a little thirty-five horse-power car, made a splendid 
showing against the big ones, reeling off mile after mile like 
clock-work, and at a gait that commanded respect. The Thomas 
Flyer that was in the race was not tuned up at all. The owner 
of the car just got into the game for the fun of it. One tire 
went wrong and had to be changed, and then the engine was not 
working well. A Cadillac was another of the ears that showed 
up well. It covered the fifty miles consistently, and showed 
conclusively that it is a reliable car. 

The officials who handled the events worked like old-timers 
at the game. There was never a hitch nor any excitement. 
Everything went along like clock-work. Results were announced 
without hesitation. There was never a doubt on any point. In 
the big fifty mile event, the timers prepared sheets, and were 
able at any stage of the game to announce how every car stood. 
When the Stevens-Duryea went over the line, the other cars 
were checked. It was simply done in a simple manner. No one 
could have improved on their work; there was no room for im- 
provement. It will be well for the officers of the club to re- 
member the experience of these races, and when another takes 
place to see that the same judges and timers officiate. 

When those entered in the big race were asked to name their 
judges and other officials, as the evenl was not [riven In Ihe club, 
but was for the cup offered by the Hotel Del Monte, the] 
and all, asked if the officials of the club who had acted the da] 
previous would not take the stand again. Such men are rare. 

The tires used on the Stevena-Duiyea were Flak's, while all 
but two of the winning ears on Thursday had Diamond tires. 
Both of the lines of tires carried their ears through without 
trouble. 

A word for Manager \\ a he Hotel Dei Monte. The 

arrangement- were perfect. Thursdaj aftei the races and Gym- 
khana game- hi rnpleted, it was found that the track 
had been badly cut up. and there were fears that h 
fifty mile event was pulled ■ following day th 
be H> dusty that the drivers would be unabl another, 
and ili hi accident. The mattei 
Mr. Warner, and at daylight he had the full force work 

the track. \t ten a. m. the work was completed, and tin 

ighly drenched. By starting time it had dried out hard, 
and tin se dust at the finish i than there 

was at the finish of the previous day. 



The Peerless Gar Made a Perfect Score 

In the Reliability Run San Francisco 
to Del Monte and nexi day, without 
any adjustment won two Races in 
succession without leaving the Track. 
Two time Winner of the Del Monte 
Cup. All this was dons on one set 
of Firestone Tires. 

AUTO LIVERY COMPANY 
Golden Gate and Van Ness Avenues, San Francisco 



20 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 13, 1907. 




INANCIAL 




The disastrous floods that from 
Effect of Rivet; time to time inundate the Sacra- 

Debris. mento Valley are usually attributed 

to the effect of hydraulic mining, 
which greatly increases the amount of detritus, or loose material 
carried by all streams. Though hydraulic mining has almost 
ceased for twenty years, the deposits of sand are still growing 
larger in the Sacramento Valley, and the navigability of the 
streams is diminished. Some of the detritus is carried down by 
the rivers to Suisun Bay ; part is banked up in the basins of the 
small streams, which transmit it gradually to the rivers. While 
being carried down to Suisun, San Pablo and San Francisco 
bays" the detritus raises the beds of the streams, thus rendering 
the effects of inundations more destructive, and covers the bo? 
torn land with layers of sand. Many plans for disposing of th a 
debris, thereby rendering the navigation of the river easier 
and lessening the damage caused by floods, have been suggest i 
by private persons and public commissioners. Though no spec- 
ial attention has been devoted to the harbor of San Francisco. 
the disposal of the detritus is a matter of serious importance to 
that port. It has been suggested that the detritus should be con- 
veyed by hydraulic means to waste land at the edge of the Sacra- 
mento Valley; that the debris be employed to raise the tule 
swamps above the level of inundations, or be impounded by 
means of dams in the foothills, and that the banks of the Sacra- 
mento River be so raised and strengthened that its stream, when 
in flood, may carry the debris down to San Francisco Bay and 
scour a deep channel there. 

The importance of the matter is fully recognized, and the 
Geological Survey in California is devoting much attention to 
its investigation, both in the field and in the laboratory. The 
quantity of mining debris, Ihe agricultural quality of the river 
deposits, the mechanical laws governing the transportation of 
detritus by rivers, and the effect of the extension of the delta 
of the Sacramento River in the harbor ol San Francisco, are 
being investigated systematically. A sustained effort is being 
made to ascertain how far floods are due to other causes than 
the great quantities of detritus carried down by the rivers, and 

what proportion of the detritus is derived from other s ces 

than hydraulic mining. The field of investigation is new, and 
ii is believed that the results obtained will be valuable not only 
in the solution of the debris problem, but also of engineering 
questions of a wider scope. 

The Tonopah Miner, in a recent is- 
A Stock Clearing sue, publishes some facts advocating 

EOUSB WANTED. a local clearing house for b1 

Among other thing- it says: "San 
Francisco exerts over tbc Nevada market a greater influence 
than is wielded by any other outside mart. She has a car strike 
and the threat of others. Her banks have ceased Loaning money. 
Her stocks are thrown on the market, and this lias alarmed New 
York and Philadelphia. Goldfield brokers have been accused 
of manipulating the market. The public would gladly see just 
now a demonstration of their ability in that line. It is safe to 
say that within the last three weeks the leading dealers on the 
old Exchange of Goldlield have lost $600,000 of their own coin 
in the depreciation of securities. Proportionately Goldfield is 
the biggest loser. Goldfield is the heaviest buyer. Some New 
York and Pennsylvania capitalists are heavily interested in 
Nevada mines, but it is not to their advantage to bear the mar- 
ket. Railroad stocks have tumbled, and other industrials have 
suffered by attacks, past and imminent, yet but from $100,000 
to $250,000 of the $50,000,000 to $100,000,000 daily exchange 
business in New York is in Nevada stocks. The baneful 
influence of Wall street has been exaggerated. The selling and 
the unloading is being done in San Francisco. San Francisco 
served her apprenticeship at 'shorts* in the good old Comstock 
days. The bear clique of that city, supported somewhat by the 
professionals of New York and Philadelphia, has been selling 
shares it never owned. Wash sales by outside jobbers have played 
into its hand. The remedy is a clearing house that will enforce 



prompt delivery. Such a panacea will run the shorts to cover, 
and meanwhile the period of depression will result in some good, 
the weeding out of whatever stocks mav lack the virtue to entitle 
them to higher prices than they now demand." 

San Francisco has an indebtedness 
The Financing of a of $5,000,000 in bonds, sold some 
Metropolis. time ago. This is a rank absurdity 

for a city of its size and importance, 
but possibly in view of the class of men in control of its public 
affairs in the past, it is just as well. However, now that there 
is a likelihood of a clean administration in the future, the credit 
of the city will be improved, and a large bond issue can be made 
available for public improvements. The city is badly in need of 
decent streets, a proper sewer system, public buildings, a lighting 
and water plant suited, to the needs of a metropolis which this 
is destined to be. Ignorance, thievery and general incom- 
petency on the part of ward heelers and curb politicians elevated 
to positions of trust, has retarded the growth of the city by low- 
ering its credit abroad. This, it is to be hoped, is now past, and 
that the future will see officials at the head of the municipality 
who will add dignity to the positions they fill, and enable the 
financiers of the nation to loan their money on city securities 
with a sense of security that they are doing business with people 
em lowed with some sense of moral responsibility. It will be 
wise, however, to banish from the ranks of those at the head of 
civic affaire men who can stoop so low as to enforce tribute from 
brothel keepers and the. criminal classes generally before inviting 
subscriptions for bonds from people who cannot reconcile such 
conduct with commercial respectability and integrity. Till then, 
it is hopeless to expect much financial recognition from the out- 
side world. 

The financial year now closing for 
Large Gains of the Santa Fe Railroad is said to 

Santa Fe. have been the most profitable since 

the road opened. Its gross earn- 
ings will be much in excess of any previous year, having grown 
at the rate of more than $1,000,000 a month over the previous 
year, which was itself a record-breaker, while the net earnings 
have increased at the rate of about $250,000. The Santa Fe 
ha- now under operation 9,259 miles of read, and its length is 
being increased constantly. The most important work before 
it is the linking of its Pacific Coast and Gulf lines, when it will 
have a direct line, not only from Chicago to Los Angeles and 
San Francisco, but one from Galveston to both those California 
points. 

o * a 

The capital stock of the Ophir Silver Mining Company has 
been increased by action of the stockholders from 100.800 shares 
of the p." ..cur of $3 each "to 201,600 shares, of the par value 
of $:! each. Its corporate existence lias been extended for the 
period of fifty years from this date. 



Writing always in sight. 

L. & M. ALEXANDER & CO. 

EXCLUSIVE PACIFIC COAST DEALERS 

L. C. Smith 8 Bros. Typewriter 

RECENT SALES: 

W, and J. SLOANE * CO. 

ANGLO CALIFORNIA!* BANK 

STANDARD OIL CO. 

WESTERN UNION TELEGRAPH CO. 

UNION TRUST BANK 

Send For Descriptive CaUtlogue. 

L. & M. ALEXANDER & CO. 

1820 Fillmore street, San Francisco. 




Zaclig 8 Go. 

Stock Brokers 



Tonopah, Goldfield, Bullfrog, 

Manhattan and Comstocks 

a Specialty 



Formerly of 306 Montgomery Street, have resumed business in their 
own building 324 Bush Street, directly opposite the new San 
Francisco Stock and Exchange Building. 



.hi.Y 13. 1907. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



21 



Triumph of the 

STEVENS-DURYEA 




THE STEVENS-DURYEA "BIG SIX" 

won the 50-mile race at Del Monte for the Hotel Del 
Monte Trophy. The time was 61 minutes,ONLY FOUR 
SECONDS BEHIND THE WORLD'S RECORD 

The STEVENS-DURYEA "BIG SIX" was also an EASY VICTOR 
in the S-mile free-for-all at Del Monte 

We Are Making PROMPT DELIVERIES of Our 1908 STEVENS-DURYEA SIX-CYLINDER GARS 

Big Six - - - - $6,000 Four Cylinder - - - $2,500 

Light Six - - - $3,500 Light Six Limousine - - $4,500 

Four-Cylinder Limousine - - - $3,300 

Manufactured by the STEVENS-DURYEA COMPANY, Chicopee Falls, Miss. 

PACIFIC MOTOR CAR COMPANY, 

Distributers 

376-380 GOLDEN GATE AVENUE SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFONNIA 



22 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 13, 1907. 




VDMQBILE 



J^L 



The annua] endurance run and meet of the Automohile Club 
of California, held during the past week at Del Monte, was one 
of the most successful ever held under the auspices of this club. 
On Thursday, July 4-th, the following events were run: 

First event (speed judging contest) — Won by Ely in a Peer- 
less. Time, 3 minutes. 

Second event (runabouts) — Won by Tony Nichols, in a 
Franklin. Time, 3:14. 

Third event (100 yard dash) — Won by Tony Nichols in a 
Franklin. Time, 133^ seconds. 

Fourth event (touring cars) — Owned and won by Hickman 
in a Moline. Time. 4:40. 

Fifth event (speed judging contest) — Won by Hendry in a 
Moline. Time, 3 minutes. 

Sixth event (runabouts. 10 miles) — Won by Bert Dingley in a 
Pope-Hartford. Time 12:43. 

Seventh event (100 yard dash, gas cars only) — Won by .Tack- 
Fleming in a Pierce Arrow. Time, 11% seconds. 

Eighth event (Del Monte cup. live miles) — Owned and won 
by Mas A. Kosenfeld in a Peerless. Time, fi.16%. 

Ninth event — Postponed. 

Tenth event (touring cars, five miles) — Owned by Welsh, and 
won by IT. F. Warner, in a Packard. Time. (\ :W o. 

Twelfth event (free for all, five miles) — Won by A. B. < losti- 
gan in a Stevens-Duryea six cylinder. Tine-. 5:44%. 

On Thursday evening, the proprietors of the Del Monte 
offered a $100 eup for a 50-mile race for cars over 24 horse- 
power. Tin' following ears were entered: Stevens-Duryea, six 
cylinder; Thomas, "0; Stearns. Peerless, Cadillac, Thomas 40. 
and Locomobile. For the first six miles it was an exciting race 
i tin' Stearns and Stevens-Duryea, when it was found 
that one of the pins in the carbureter had dropped out of the 
Steams, and the ear was not getting gas. By the time repairs 
wciv made, there was no further hope, and from that time on 
there was nothing but the Stevens-Duryea, which won in the 
remarkably fast lime of 1:01 for the 50 miles. 

The following members acted as officers of the meeting at Del 
Monte: A. 1!. Watson, chairman; Clinton F. Worden and W. B. 
Bonnie, judges; M. L. Requa and E. H. Pease, Jr., time-keep- 
ere, ami R. R. i'Hommedieu, starter. 



The Big Northern Automobile has arrived at last. It is a 
fifty horse-power machine, and is attracting universal attention. 
The auto enthusiasts are loud in their praise of this air con- 
trolled car. Every ingenious device that the human mind is 
capable of inventing seems to culminate in this most up-to-date 
automobile. In simplicity of design and machinery, the North- 
ern stands to-day as a marvel of mechanical skill. The lines in 
the body are straight and long, carrying out the idea of great 

spied and graceful elegance. 

* * * 

The President and General Manager of the Pioneer Automo- 
bile Company. Mr. F. P. Brinegar, is on his way East on his 
annual trip to attend the meeting of the stockholders of the 
I-]. R. Thomas Co.. of Buffalo, and the Thomas Detroit Co. It is 
an object of his trip to confer with E. R. Thomas about the 
taximeter cab service it is proposed to introduce in San Fran- 
cisco. 

* * * 

If you chance to meet any one driving an automobile whose 
tires look more like a sieve than they do like tubes intended to 
contain air under high pressure, do not fall into the error of 
thinking that the unfortunate chauffeur has accidentally driven 
into a bed of tacks. If you are in doubt as to the real cause of 
the strange-looking spectacle, inquire of the chauffeur, and. if 
he is honest (and chauffeurs, like hack drivers, are generally 
honest, inasmuch as they seldom tell anything), you will prob- 
ably learn that he has been speed killing out in Fruitvale. That 
will be all you need to ask. for unless you are more dense than 
ili.' average individual, you wi'.l at once be possessed of the 
knowledge that Tom Carroll, the big constable of Brooklyn 
township, has been abroad with his shotgun and his aim was 
unerring. Tom says speed killing in beautiful Fruitvale must 
stop, and he who offends against the law must either peacefully 
submit to arrest or take the chances of having the tires of his 

automobile shot fi.-ll of holes. 

* * * 

Autoists from Santa Cruz, as well as those from San Jose, and 
up the line to San Francisco, are very bitter in their denuncia- 
tions of the Southern Pacific Company's ferry boat restrictions, 
governing the carrying of auto cars. They claim the rule is un- 
fair and unjust, and that it really amounts to class discrimina- 
tion. The new rule adopted by the S. P. officials provides that 
only four autos shall 1»' allowed mi a ferry-boat at one time. 
When it is considered that there are five hundred automobiles in 
Santa Clara County alone, a very large per rent of which are 
taken every Sunday and holiday for the trip around the bay, it is 
easy to understand what a tie-up there is at both the ferry en- 
trance in San Francisco and at the Oakland mole, since the rule 
went into effect. 



KisselKar — $18 5 



HERE IS A CAR BUILT TO DEMONSTRATE THAT ALL THE 
ESSENTIAL POINTS OF A HIGH GRADE AUTOMOBILE MAY 
BE EMBODIED IN A CONSTRUCTION COSTING ONLY ONE- 
HALF TO TWO-THIRDS THE PREVAILING PRICES. 
NO OTHERj FOUR CYLINDER CAR OF SUCH ALL-ROUND 
QUALITY AND COMPLETENESS HAS EVER BEEN OFFERED 
AT ANYWHERE NEAR THE PRICE. 



F. O. B. FACTORY 




FOUR-CYLINDERS- 3 HORSE POWER 

SELECTIVE TYPE TRANSMISSION. CARS IN STOCK FOR 
IMMEDIATE DELIVERY. ONE YEARj, GUARANTEE 

CENTURY AUTO CO. 



LOU LATZ, Mgr. 



462 Golden GaLe Avenue 



Phone Franklin 2826 



July 13, 1907. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



23 



Oi i the -i popular runs al Del Monte on Thursday was 

M.i\ Rosenfeld's win in the Del Monte cup race, his friends 

giving him a rousing el r when he rami' past the winning post. 

Eaving von (lie cup two years in succession it now becomes his 
property. 

A test is to be made of the different speed ordinances of the 
little bucolic communities about the bay of San Francisco. The 
initial case will be brought as against the speed ordinance of 
the town of Morgan Hill, down on the peninsula. Mr. Rector, of 
the While Company, will make the test. The case was called 
for the 10th, and postponed. 

* * * 

At the race meet at Santa Rosa on the 3d and 4th, the fol- 
lowing scores were made: 

5 mile touring cars or runabouts, Rambler first, White second. 

25 mile free-for-all, White first, time. 29.07; Pope second, 
31.10; Buick third, 32.58. 

5 mile touring cars or runabouts, won by Buick runabout, 
time, 7.07. 

10 mile, for touring cars, $4,000 or under. Buick runabout, 
won, time 13.25. 

5 mile, touring cars or runabouts, Buick runabout won, time 
7.43. 

25 mile open, won by Buick touring car (runabout second), 
time 37.00114. 

5 mile, to carry four passengers, won by Buick touring car, 
time 8.59. 

10 mile handicap, Buick runabout won (touring ear second), 
time 12.05. 

* # * 

The only remarkable feature of the winning of the Del Monte 
cup by Max L. Bosenfeld in a Peerless Car was the fact that it 
was a 190fi model, that had been run in the livery service for 
some months, and was formerly owned by Fred Sharon. The 
car won by such a large margin of time that it was not a close 
race, once Rosenfeld bail passed bis competitors on the turns. 
He drove all the turns wilboul ,1 let-up or the slightest signs of 
skidding. 




LEGITIMATELY HIGH PRICED 

DEMONSTRATION BY APPOINTMENT 

LOZIER AUTO AGENCY, 

132 Valencia St*. San Francisco 




Thomas B. Jetfery 8 Company, 1)7-125 Valencia St., San Francisco 



MOLINE ROADSTERS 

At the Crescent Garage, corner of c^VIcAllister and Gough 
streets one may buy a Moline Rjoadster, 4-cylinder, 20 horse- 
power for $1950 f. o. b. Immediate delivery. 



GOODYEAR DETACHABLE TIRES 

and GOODYEAR UVIVERSAL Rims 

The most perfect tire made, only 1.41 per cent 
defective Goodyear tires during the year if 
1906. 15 per cent over size in diameter--by~ 
which you get more for your money, your 
tires last longer and your car rides easier- 
guaranteed against rim cuts. With our 
universal rims, tires off and on again in 15 se- 
conds. Over 35000 satisfied users in the United 
States. 

W. D. Newerf Rubber Co., Coast Agents 

506 Golden Gate Avenue, San Francisco, Calif. 

BRANCHES: Los Angeles, San Diego, Fresno and Portland 



24 

r 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Jdlt 13, 1907. 




The Greatest, Automobile Built 

FOREIGN or AMERICAN 

As evidence we offer the following list of satisfied purchasers of 1907 Thomas Cars to whom we 
refer you: 



B. M. Tobln, Hibemia Bank, San Francisco, Cal. 
Herman Heyneman, 325 Davis street, San Francisco, Cal, 

J. Goldberg, Goldberg. Bowen & Co., San Francisco, Cal. 

M. S. Koshland. Washington and Maple streets, San Francisco. Cal. 

Fred Michaels, Second street and South Park. San Francisco, Cal. 

Chas. S. Wheeler. 2113 Washington street, San Francisco, Gal. 

J. C. Campbell, 1101 Laguna street, San Francisco. Cal. 

J. B. Metcalf, Bushnell Place, Berkeley. Cal. 

California Powder Works, San Francisco. Cal. 

U. S. Senator George D. Nixon, Tonopah, Nevada. 

Kenneth Donnellan, California near Kearny streets. San Francisco. 

G. D. Doubleday, Montgomery, near Bush street. San Francisco, Cal. 

Leon M. Hall, Kobl Building, San Francisco, Cal. 

Wm. Curlett. Mutual Bank Building, San Francisco, Cal. 

W. B. Reis, SOO Eddy streeT, San Francisco, Cal. 

Louis Metzger, 2053 Sutter street, San Francisco. Cm. 

Mrs. B. W. Reis, San Francisco. Cal. 

W. F. Fries. Hotel Majestic, San Francisco, Cal. 

I,. A. Savage (2), Reno, Nevada. 

A. D. Nash (2), Tonopah, Nevada. 

F. A. Keith .2i. Ti.nnpali. Nevada. 

T. L. Oddie. Tonopah, Nevada. 

Humboldt Gates, Tonopah. Nevada. 

F. L. Salsberry, Tonopah, Nevada. 
Key Pittman. Tonopah, Nevada. 

1 '.». Mackenzie, Tonopah, Nevada. 
Dr. Miller, Tonopah. Nevada. 
Mr. Frohleich, Tonopah, Nevada. 
W. J. Stonebam. Tonopah. Nevada. 
A. G. Raycraft, Tonopah, Nevada. 
W. J. Douglass. Tonopah, Nevada. 

G. L. Rickard. Tonopah. Nevada. 
Harry Chickering, Tonopah, Nevada. 
E. T. Wallace, Tonopah, Nevada. 

J. W. Brock, Tonopah, Nevada. 

Dr. L. E. Benson, Tonopah. Nevada. 

.1. B. Daniel, Nevada Wonder Mining Co.. Reno, Nevada. 

George Wingfield, Gold held, Nevada. 

E. J. Williams. Fairview, Nevada, 

Oliver Hirst. San Francisco. Cal. 

Pat O'Brien, Berkeley, Cal. 

D. E. Francis, San Francisco, Cal. 

Albert Pissis, Hotel Majestic. San Francisco, Cal. 
Dr. J. M. Macdonald, San Francisco. Cal. 

E. J. Freeman. San Francisco, Cal. 
E. & R. Quarg, San Francisco. Cal. 



F, B. Booth, San Francisco, Cal. 

Frank H. Johnson, Johnson-Locke Mercantile Co., San Francisco i i 

J. I i. Mackenzie, 1611 Franklin street. San Francisco. Cal. 

A. J. Pond, 1 tealdsburg, Cal. 
i,. Leon, San Jose, Cal. 

B. G. White, 1700 Sutt.r street. San Francisco, Cal. 
R. M. Smilie, Telegraph avenue, Berkeley. Cal. 

F. W. Bradley. 1611 Franklin street, San FrandSCO, Cal. 
M. L. ReQ.ua, San Francisco. Cal. 

John Brichetto, Banta, Cal. 

C. W. Frank. Sail Francisco. Cal. 
L. C. Larsen. San Francisco, Cal. 
Joseph Smith. San Francisco. Cal. 

G. H. Shaffer, San Mateo, Cal. 

R. L. Coleman, St. Francis Hotel, San Francisco, Ci 

Johnson & Lowrey, San Francisco. Cal. 

Stewart- Barker ( !o., San Frani Isco, Cal 

Mrs. M. Love. 2501 Van Ness avenue, San Francisco, Cal. 

C. 11. Beauchamp, Bay and Kearny streets, San Francisco, Cal. 

C. F. Horner, Centcrville. Cal. 

Guido & Ray, San Francisco, Cal. 

Otto Turn Suden, San Francisco. Cal. 

C. E. Foul, San Francisco, Cal. 

R. A. Perry, North American Dredging Co., Oakland. Cal. 

G-. H. Buckingham, San Francisco. Cal. 

Walter Wood. E. K. Wood Lumber Co.. San Francisco, Cal. 

P. M. Bums, Mackay & Co., San Francisco, Cal. 

W. B. TubbS, Tubbs Cordage Co., San Francisco, Cal. 

A B. inn. Mill Banking Co.. Petaluma, Cal. 

I C ll-naling. San Francisco. Cal. 

W. J. Dlngee, San Francisco, Cal. 

A. c. Hellman, San Mateo, Cal. 

.Mrs. M. I'-ndleton, Sacramento. < Sal. 

\\ i terman Bros., Fresno, Cal. 

If- W. Postelthwait, San Francisco. Cal. 

F. I I. Foote. San Francisco. Cal. 

W. F. Hunt. San Jose, Cal. 

Sheriff of Alameda County. Alameda, Cal. 

Miss Sarah Drum, San Francisco, Cal. 

M. Schimetschek, 54!> Hayes street, San Francisco. Cal. 

C. B. Arendt, Pleasanton, Cal. 

A. F. Dickinson and M. l.. Feder, San Francisco, Cal. 

Fernando Nelson. GS4 Second avenue, San Francisco. Cal. 

W. A. speck. 51 Geary street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Joseph Schnerr, San Francisco, Cal. 



ED nTK/>Tf\/ic f*r\ Member Association Licensed 
• IV.. 1 I1U111U5 Kj\J. Automobile Manufacturers 

PIONEER AUTOMOBILE CO., California and Nevada Representatives 
17th St., bet. Telegraph and San Pablo Avenues, Oakland 901 Golden Gate Ave., San Francisco 



July 13, 1907. 



AXD CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



In entering ears for a grueling contest like the Glidden tour 
promises to be this year, it is usuail for manufacturers to put in 
cars that have never been used before, and in which there is 
not a part that has nof gone into the car perfectly now and with- 
out its being subjected to any opportunity for wear. But one 
ear that lias an historic interest has been entered this year, and 
will represent the Automobile Club of Buffalo in its attempt to 
retain the Glidden trophy. The car is the Thomas Flyer, with 
which Ernest Kelly established a new non-stop motor record of 
21 days 3 hours and 29 minutes in January of this year, his 
inn having been made under the most adverse circumstances 
for weather and roads. Reduced to hours, the car's non-stop 
record was 50T hours and 29 minutes. 

When Kelly's run was concluded, after he had taken the 
Thomas from Harrisburg to Philadelphia, thence to New York 
and from New York to Chicago through a raging blizzard, it 
was returned to the factory at Buffalo, where it was turned over 
tn the students in the chauffeurs' school conducted by the E. R. 
Thomas Motor Co., where it was used as an instruction car. 

George S. Salzman, who has entry number 9 in the tour, de- 
cided that he would use this car in the contest. A thorough 
examination was made, and it was found that the only changes 
necessary would be the repainting of the body, new upholster- 
ing, and the replacing of the old fenders and running boards. 
These latter had been battered out of their original shape by 
reason of the wheel dropping into deep frozen ruts on the New 
York-Chicago run. The upholstering, it was thought, would 
scarcely do, since it was literally coated with ice on several oc- 
casions during the non-stop portion of the car's existence. 

The car had been run -J ,000 miles before it entered on its 

record-breaking experience; it ran almost 3,000 miles then, and 

a conservative estimate would place its mileage at 4,000 since 

that time, a total of 11,000 miles before it will have begun its 

long trip for the trophy. 

* * # 

The Pope-Hartford 40, driven by Bert Dingley, showed up 



Cadillac-Packard Motor Gars 



All that is best in motor car construction 




Deliveries of 1908 Packards in October and November. 
Deliveries of 30 horse power Cadillacs August and September. 
Deliveries of 20 horse power Cadillacs in July. 



GUYLER LEE, 



453 Golden Gate Avenue 



San Francisco, Gal 



well in the 10 mile runabout race against the Thomas 70 and 
Pierce Arrow 45, It was nip and tuck between the Pope-Hart- 
ford in the Thomas, until the last mile, when the Pope-Hartford 

got into the lead and held it to the finish. 

* * * 

One of the surprises of the Del ^Monte meet was the way the 
Moline, a low-priced ear, annexed the fourth event for touring 
ears from the higher-priced ears. Nobody looked on this car 
with any seriousness, but it came through and won in great 
shape. 



rj 53ve^ 1907 



"The &est Jutomobile" 




Price $4500 FOB Oe»eJa»d. 5 F 

TV Steam* flexibility of motor ii the greatest of any car. Besides bang a tnoa* powerful car, the Stearns is one of the roost 
durable machine*, built. 

STEARNS cars are designed by engineers, built by mechanics, tettrd try eiperti and conseoucnily operated with satisfaction 
by their users. We invite your caiehil investigation «nd comparison, confident that we will profit thereby. 

THESE ARE FACTS THAT WE WANT TO DEMONSTRATE TO TOD 

Ph.ne Franklin 1008 

California-Nevada Automobile Company, 368 Golden Gate Avenue 

SAN FRANCISCO 



In the race meet at Santa Rosa on July 
) tli. a model "<;" White, driven by Al. 
Piepenberg, won two out of the three races 
in which it started, and in the endm 
contest from Los Angeles, a model "G" 
While Pullman finished with a one thou- 
sand per cenl score. 

The While victory at Santa Rosa was 
The most important ra 
the meet, the 6 mile, was a pro 
Piepenburg. Some of those who did not 
-tand the possibilities of the ■ 

made wagers that it would run out of 
water. The lienors had little liking for 
it in such a long run. But Piepei 
took the car to the front at the start— in 
fact, in all the races he was usually fifty 
ahead in the first hundred. The 
lead he opened up in tie- - only 

an indication of what was to follow. He 
i round the track. 
The ] .-r was lapped in the fifth 

mile, lapped again in the tenth, ami a 
third time in th nth. The Pope 

car was lapped in the tenth and almost 

was over. 

of the lead- 

_ naturally took it easy, 

but had he pushed on, he could have made 

much better time. The best mile in this 

The ten-mile free-for-all ran- was prob- 
ably s er run on 
any track, "f am sure I never saw one 
which was anything like it." said Piepen- 
The White car jumped ahead at the 
led for half a », and then 
was passed by a Pope-Toledo. In the 
third mile a pump check stock, and it 
looked as if the White had qu 
as it slowed down to a mere touring 
However, it began to pick up, and by the 
;. the third mile, 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTEK 



July 13, 1907. 



it was going well again, but the Pope- 
Toledo was three-quarters of a mile ahead. 
Then Piepenburg settled down to busi- 
ness. Chunk after chunk of the other 
car's lead was cut down each mile, and in 
the tenth mile on the last turn the Pope- 
Toledo was caught and passed. The 
plucky car and driver were overwhelming- 
ly applauded from the grand-stand. It 
was converting a lost race into a victori- 
ous one, and the game driver who had 
nerve enough to go after the seemingly 
impossible deserves great credit. This 
slackening up of the White car accounts 
for the slow time in this race, but with 
the car once -'going," miles were turned 
off in the best racing fashion. The fastest 
mile was covered in 1.02. 

In the ten-mile handicap, in which the 
highest-priced cars were put on scratch 
and the other cars were given a start of 
one yard for every $1 less in valuation 
than'the scratch car, the White struck its 
pace rather slowly, but settled down to 
some very fast work. There were seven 
entries, and the White overhauled all ex- 
cept two. Another 300 yard? and it 
would have won again. The other scratch 

car was badly beaten. 

* * * 

The following account has been received 
of the White's work in the 185 mile en- 
durance run to Lakeside, California: 

"Mrs. L. W. Powell's White Pullman, 
carrying Mrs. Powell and party, including 
seven passengers all told- together with 
their baggage, amounting to fully 350 
pounds, started on the endurance run 
Thursday morning, June 27th, the sev- 
enth car to leave. The day proved exceed- 
ingly hot, and before Elsinore was reached 
— 86 miles away — which was the night 
control, a number of people had been 
overcome by the heat. Many cars which 
had not been known to be "steamers," de- 
veloped a great, tendency to produce steam 
— in fact, they showed far more than the 
White steamer itself. The second day's 
run from Elsinore to Lakeside, about 100 
mill's, proved to be by all odds the hottest 
dav on record. At Escondido, and even 
before that point was reachedj the ther- 
mometer in the shade was registering 120 
degrees, more cars were laid out, and es- 
pecially in the mountains around Lake- 
Bide, where one after another succumbed 
to the fierce heat and severe grades. Al- 
though the While car started No. 7, she 
passed, before Lakeside was reached, three 
cars, viz: The Cleveland, Wayne and 
Prayer-Miller, arriving No. i at Lakesid . 
making the entire trip on nineteen gal- 
lons of gasoline and 14 gallons of water. 
To do full credit to the car's performance, 
it should be stated that through the fault 
of the observer, they got oil' the road four 
mill's. The return trip was made in 12 
hours elapsed time, this including two 
hours for stops on the road, meals, etc. On 
the return trip four cars were passed more 
or less in the state of collapse, the Great 
Smith, the American runabout, the 
Thomas Detroit, and an Aerocar. During 
the entire trip the White car was oft' the 
high gear but once, and that was w&en 
they were held up by the car in front of 
them being unable to get over the steep 
entries in the mountains. Also on the en- 
tire trip of 189 miles the hood was raised 
but once, and lli.it was to oil the engine. 



BUICK 

2 CYLINDER CARS 

made a sensational showing at the Santa Rosa races, winning 
six out gf eight events. All against cars gf double the price and 
power gf the Buick. 

Cars in stock for immediate delivery. 

4-Cylinder Touring Cars $2050.00 

2- " " " 1400.O0 

2- " Runabouts 1250.00 

HOWARD AUTO CO., 



PHONE FRANKLIN 2034 



404-406 GOLDEN GATE AVE' 



IRVIN SILVERBERG 



CHAS. S. MITCHELL 



THE IRVIN MACHINE WORKS 

Best Automobile Repair Shop West of Chicago 
General Machine Work and Gear Catting 

Our automobile repair department is equipped with the finest up-to-date 
machinery. The unusual size and consequent steady work enables us to 
employ specialists Instead of expecting our mechanics to be Jack-of-all 
trades. Moreover, we can furnish in advance to owners exact estimates 
on cost of any repairs they may contemplate. 

Phone Market 2366. 335-337 Golden Gate Ave. San Francisco 



jfl ttrtielk Runabout 



4 CYLINDER 
16-18 HORSEPOWER 
90-INCH WHEELBASE 
30x3 1-2 INCH TIRES. 
PRICE $1150 



OSEN & HUNTER AUTO COMPANY 



407 Golden Gate Avenue. 



Phone Market 2723. 




USE MAYERLE'S EYEWATER. 

before exposing your oyos to strong wind, dust, light or sun. It is a perfectly harmless and cffi-c- 
U« preparation. Guaranteed under the U. S. Drags Act, Juno HOih. 'Oil. Sorial >'.. 7;i70 Mr 
Chit*. Crow, cam of W. W. Montague & Co., Pipu Shop, gays: "I have been IrOnbl I irtti m] v 
for a number of yearn I trim! a hot tin of y-'ur Eyewater and find it it the best Eyewater I ever 
D i in i would ii"i be without it in the honse." Highly recommended for weak oj pool 
sight. «ore eye*, cloudiness of vision, floating spots, pain about the eyes, behind the head or in 
t timpli-s, watery Of discharging eyes, feeling like sand in the eyes, burning, wtn»rti n k ', Itching, 
scratching, twitching- gluey eyes, heavy eyelids and other eye trouble*, Pereom hiring their sen- 
sitive eye- Bl poeed to Hi. strong light, dull wind or sun can get instant relief bj nit Kg Mstjorlo'l 
Eyewater HEWARE OF INJI/KIOIS IMITATIONS Take no trjbatitata. Pries Wo; bj mail, flftOi 
i or one dozen bottles, *i 00. Hajarie's. Antiseptic Eyeglass Wipari, to bo natri when glMMl blur. 
tire or strain the. eyet, 2 for Me. No glaases leavo George Mayerle's Optical Institute unless ab- 
solutely corrnct Addrois oil comiuunicatinns to George Mayerle, lltit Golden Oaf > 
Francisco, near Webster. Phono West 3706 Cut this out. 



Mackay Cure for Alcoholism 

SUREST, SAFEST, SHORTEST 

The Only Cure Adopted by Any Government. Strongly 
recommended by His Grace, tbe Archbishop ol Quebec, 
and scores ol scientific and philanthropic author- 
ities. Home Treatment, no publicity nor deten- 
tion from business ; no opium nor hypodermic. 
It cures, that's all. Sanitarium for special cases. 

Correspondence ptrictly contidential and In plain sealed envelopes. 
MACKAY TREATMENT CO. 

Write Department 7 , 61 Maiden Lane, New York. 



July 13, 1907. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



25 



At present the prospect is that there will be one hundred en- 
tries and possibh more, for the A. A. A. tour and contests IV 
the Qlidden and Hower trophies. The entries close with K. 15. 
Hower, TliO Main street, Buffalo, on .July 3d. 

» * * 

Anv one having a job lot of silver mugs for sale cheap mighl 
try the Automobile Club oi America. It has forty-one cups to 
give the ears that had a perfect score in the sealed bonnel con- 
test Beer steins will not do. 

* * * 

Because of his having inspired the sealed bonnet contest, the 
sobriquet of "Father Joyce" is clinging to, General Manager 

James Joyce of the American Locomotive Automobile Company. 

* * * 

If present indications are of any significance, many more 
closed vehicles will be in use this year than formerly. The 
Electric Vehicle Company report a heavy demand for limousine 
and landaulet bodies as well as for electric broughams and lan- 
daulets. 

Automobile and Society Notes. 

Automobile trips to Santa Cruz are decidedly the popular 
thing among the Four Hundred of San Francisco and Burlin- 
game. Registered at the Sea Beach last Saturday were many 
people of prominence, notably James D. Phelan and party, Win. 
H. Langdon and party, A. C. Hellman and party of San Fran- 
cisco ; Francis Carolan and party of eight from Burlingame ; 
also Mr. and Mrs. Robert Oxnard, Mr. and Mrs. Rudolph Spreck- 
els. Mr. and Mrs. Robert Coleman, Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Taylor, 
Mr. and Mrs. George Newhall, Mr. and Mrs. E. W. Hopkins, 
Mr. and Mrs. Augustus Taylor, Miss Page Brown, Mr. and 
Mrs. Fred McNear and Mr. and Mrs. George A. Pope. Many 
of these people intended remaining over the Fourth, while the 
others remained only long enough to witness the production of 
"The Sorceress," with Miss Nance O'Neill in the leading role, at 
the opening of the Casino Theatre Monday night. 



1 907 PREMIER 



'ADVANCE AGENTS OF PROSPERITY . 

The work of bringing new and desirable settlers to California 
is going mi constantly through the efforts of the California Pro- 
motion Committee, and it is in the power of every individual 
in the Stale to give material assistance in this regard. There is 
no one that cannot do a little in this direction at the coal of a 
postal card, and the committee asks all who are desirous of help- 
ing increase the population of the State to semi in names of their 
Eastern friends, relatives and acquaintances to the' committee, 
and it will send literature and letters in an endeavor to haye 
those outsiders become citizens of the state. The Committee in 
writing to these people will tell them at whose instance the letters 
are written, and if the people of California will also write to 

their friends thai the Committee is doing this, and that il- 

menls can be depended upon, it will go a long way toward induc- 
ing people in the Kast and Europe to come to California to make 
their homes. 

Much good has been done in this way in the past, as « 
denced l>\ the thousands who came to California this spring to 
make their homes. It is expected by the committee that as many 
more will come during the prevalence of the fall colonial rates 

on the railroads, and if any of the readers of this paper know of 

any one whom they think would make good California! \ 

should take up the matter at once and send the name to the 

California Promotion Committee, California Building, Onion 
Square, San Francisco, so that that organization can widen its 
campaign for increasing California's population. 



RAINIER 



35 h. p. Make and Break with Slmms-Bosch Magneto. 

T^e Pullman of Motor Cars 

Guaranteed free of repairs for one year. 

HAYES & DAM, 

428 Golden Gate Avenue. San Francisco 



Old Poodle Dog Restaurant 

824-826 Eddy St., near Van Ness Ave. Formerly at Bush St., 
cor. Grant Avenue. Phone Franklin 63. 



The Qu lity 
Car 

Touring Gar ,.' and Touring 

Runabout, S2400. 24- 8 H. 

P, 4-cylinder water o Jed 
selective type, sliding gear 

transmission. 



E. P. S10SS0N, Agent 
Northern California 

GOLDEN GATE GARAGE 
Fell and Ashbury Streets San Francisco Phone West 6885 




GEO. P. MOORE CO., Inc. 

AUTOMOBILE SPECIALTIES 



Headquarters for Imported Novelties, Domestic Necessities and 
Local Courtesy combined with Fair Dealing. 



Branch — 1005 South Main St., Los Angeles. 
Branch— 231-233 Twelfth St., Oakland. 



721 Golden Gate Avenue, San Francisco 



SECOND HAND 

Automobiles 

BOUGHT, SOLD, EXCHANGED. Lamest stock In the West R. H. 
MORRIS. Aoto Broker, 1818-20 Telegraph Are., Oakland. Cal. Established 
1901. 



VULCANIZING 

Stevens & Elkington Rubber Co. 

Phone Franklin 612 



524 Polk St. near Golden Gate Ave. 



San Francisco, Cal. 



Electric Lamps, Bells, and Telephones 

SUPPLIES DYNAMOS 

MOTORS REPAIRS 

CENTURY ELECTRIC CONSTRUCTION CO. 
18 Fell St.. near Market. San Francisco 



KEENAN BROS. 

Automobile Engineers, Machinists and Blacksmiths. 
273 Valencia street, San Francisco. Telephone Market 1985. 



TIPS TO AUTOMOBUJSTS 

14-MILE HOUSE— 'Tncle Tom's Cabin" Automobile Supplies and re- 
Piir shop First-class accommodations. Cuisine unsurpassed on the 
CoasL "Andy." formerly of the "Cliff House." 

PALO ALTO— Corbaley & Thorpe Auto Co.. Renting, repairing and 
sundries. Fire-proof garage. Day and night service. 443-9 Emerson St. 
Telephone Main 78. 

AT SAN JOSE— for gasoline, sundries and repairs at San Jose, stop 
at Letcher's Automobile Garage, comer First and St. James. Telephone. 
Main 203. . 



S \N" JOSE— Reo & Stoddard-1 >ayton owners stop at Harrison P. 
Smith's garage. First and San Carlos streets. Motor car supplies and 

repairs. ^^^^^^____^^^_^ - ^_^ - ____ 

SAM JOSE— Lamolle Grill. 36-38 North First street The best French 
dinner in California 76c. or a la carte. Automobile parties given par- 
ticular attention. 

GILROT. CAL.-Geo. E. Tlee. general machinist, expert repairing of 

automobiles and engines a specialty. Day or night service 260 N Mon- 

nreet. 

~\L1NAS CAL— Hotel Bardln. Rates 12 per day and up. French chef. 
Best accommodations. Roads excellent. G. Laplerre. Prop. 



26 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTEJR 



July 13, 1907. 



Sabnr Unions Agm tn tlj? Wpm §>ijo» iPrtnripl? 



The following agreement has been entered into by the em- 
ployers and employees in die machine building and iron-work- 
ing interests in Great Britain. 

This agreement is the triumph of the open-shop principle, and 
is perfectly 'air to all concerned. The News Letter can suggest 
but little to improve this important mutual legislation by em- 
ployee and employer, and it is presented in these columns as a 
suggestion whereby all difficulties may be adjusted and a new 
living arrangement may be made by which the trade unionist, 
the employer and the non-union forces will live amicably to- 
gether and cease bleeding the great wealth producing professions! 
middle class to death by and through their continual quarrels. 

"As the result of a strike and lockout in the engineering and 
shipbuilding trades which, ten years ago, paralyzed those indus- 
tries throughout Great Britain for several months, the employers 
organized into a strong federation, and the employees cemented 
and strengthened their association. The strike was ended in 
1898 by a treaty which has since prevented strikes, except of a 
local and minor kind; but the employees, it is said, have never 
forgotten that the treaty was framed and signed when they were 
a beaten force. Since again becoming strong and prosperous 
they have felt that the treaty should be revised. This has now 
been done, in joint conferences of employers and employees. A 
new agreement has been signed by the officers on both sid"s 
and will be effective when ratified by the members of the work- 
men's federation. The workmen gain, in comparison with the 
old agreement, material concessions regarding piece-work an.l 
overtime, which, it is hoped, will induce them to vote affirma- 
tively. The new agreement is generally considered as of the ut- 
most importance. Framed in time of peace and prosperity, and 
with a disposition on each side to satisfy the other, it is peculiarly 
just and fair, and seems to leave no ground lor future disagree- 
ments. As tile term "engineering" refers to machine-building 
industries and iron-working concerns generally, the agreement 
is far reaching and touches interests which are vital to the coun- 
try's welfare, and reads: 

"The Agreement. 

"The federated employers shall not interfere with the proper 
functions of the trade unions, and the trade unions shall not 
interfere with the employers in the management of their business. 
Every employer may belong to the federation and every workman 
may belong to a trade union or not as either of them may think 
fit. Every employer may employ any man and every workman 
may take employment with any employer, whether the workman 
or the employer belong or not to a trade union or lo the federa- 
tion, respectively. The trade unions recommend all their mem- 
bers lint to object to work with non-union workmen ami lee 
federation recommends all their members noi to object to employ 
union workmen on the ground that they are members el' ;i trade 
union. No workman shall be required, as a condition of employ- 
ment, to make a declaration as to whether he belongs to a trade 
union or not. 

"Employers and their workmen are entitled to work piece- 
work, provided: (a) The prices to be paid shall be fixed by 
mutual arrangement between the employer and the workman or 
workmen who perform the work; (b) Each workman's day rale 
to be guaranteed irrespective of his piecework earnings : ( c I 'Over- 
time and night shift allowances to be paid in addition to piece- 
work prices on the same conditions as already prevail in each 
workshop for time work. All balances and wages to be pail 
through the office. 

"Overtime, Bating and Apprentices. 
"The federation and the trade unions are agreed that syste- 
matic overtime is to be deprecated as a method of production, and 
that when overtime is necessary the following is mutually recom- 
mended as a basis, viz.: That, no union workman shall be re- 
quired to work more than thirty-two hours' overtime in any foul 



weeks, after full shop hours have been worked, allowance being 
made for time lost through sickness, absence with leave, or en- 
forced idleness. In the following cases, overtime is not to be 
restricted: Breakdown work, repairs, replacements, or alterations 
for the employers or their customers; trial trips and repairs to 
ships: urgency and emergency. 

"Employers have the right to employ workmen at rates of 
wages mutually satisfactory to the employer and the workman 
or workmen concerned. In fixing the rates of skilled workmen 
the employer shall have regard to the rates prevailing in the dis- 
trict for fully trained and skilled men. Unions, while disclaim- 
ing any right to interfere with the wages of workmen other than 
their own members, have the right in their collective capacity to 
arrange the rate of wages at which their members may accept 
work. Genera] alterations in the rates of wages in any districl 
shall lie negotiated between the employers' local association and 
the local representatives of the- trade union or unions concerned. 

"There shall be no recognized proportion of apprentices to 
journeymen, but it shall be open to the. unions to bring forward 
for discussion the proportion of apprentices generally employed 
in the whole federated area. An apprentice shall he afforded 
facilities for acquiring a practical knowledge of tin 1 branch <<f 
trade he adopts, and shall be encouraged to obtain a theoretical 
knowledge thereof as far as circumstances permit. 

"Employers have the right lo select, train and employ (hose 
whom they consider best adapted lo the various operations carrie i 
on in their workshops and to pay them according lo their ability 
as workmen. Employers, in view of the necessity of obtaining 
tlie most economical production, whether by skilled or unskilled 
workmen, have full discretion to appoint ihe men they consider 
suitable to work all their machine tools and to determine Ihe con- 



t 



■\ 





v 



THE STRONGEST 
and most robust of men and 
women occasionally require a 
pure tonical stimulant. The 
purity and excellence of 



HUNTER. 
WHISKEY 



makes its use preferable at 
such times 



CHARGES M. REYNOLDS CO. 

Agents for California and Nevada. 

912-914 Folsom St.. San Francisco, Cal. 



J 



July 13, 1907. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



27 



ilitioiis under which they shall be worked. The federation reeom- 
nieiiil their members that, when they are carrying mil changes in 
their workshops which will result in displacement of labor, con- 
sideration should be given in the case of the workman who may 
ho displaced, with a new, it' possible, of retaining their services 
on the work affected or finding other employment for them. 

"Avoiding Disputes and Conferences. 

"With a view to avoid disputes, deputations of workmen shall 
be received by their employers, by appointment, for mutual dis" 
cussion of any question in the settlement of which both parties 
are directly concerned, or it shall be competent for an official of 
the trade union to approach the local secretary of the employers' 
association with regard to any such question, or it shall be com- 
petent for either party to bring the question before a local con- 
ference to be held between the local association of employers and 
the local representatives of the trade unions. In the event of 
either party desiring to raise any question, a local conference for 
this purpose may he arranged by application to the secretary of 
the employers' association or of the trade union concerned, as the 
case may be. The local conferences shall be held within twelve 
working days from the receipt of the application by the secretary 
of the employers' association or of the trade union or trade 
unions concerned. Failing settlement at a local conference of 
any question brought before it, it shall be competent for either 
party to refer the matter to the executive board of the federation 
and the central authority of the trade union or trade unions con- 
cerned. Central conferences shall be held at the earliest daLe 
which can be conveniently arranged by the secretaries of the fed- 
eration and of the trade union or trade unions concerned. There 
shall he no stoppage of work either of a partial or of a general 
character, but work shall proceed under the current conditions 
until the procedure provided for above has been carried through. 

"An organizing delegate of the Amalgamated Society of En- 
gineers shall be recognized as a local official entitled io take pari, 
in any local conference, hut only in his own division. In case 
of sickness, his place shall be taken by a substitute appointed 
by the executive council Any member of the executive count il 
or the general secretary of the Amalgamated Society of Engineers 
in:i\ attend local conferences, provided that the member of the 
executive counsil shall attend only such conferences as are held 
within the division represented by him. A member of tin 
executive council or the general secretary of the Steam Engine 
Makers' Society ami of the United Machine Workers 1 Associa 
lion, respectively, may attend any local conference in which the 
societies, or either of them, are directly concerned. Central i o 
I'erenccs shall he composed of members of the executive board of 
the federation, and members of the central authority of the tra h 
union or trade unions concerned. An employer who refuses to 
employ trade unionists will not he eligible to >\i in conferei 



BANKING 



AN AMERICAN MEERSCHAUM MINE. 

Meerschaum, so highly prized by pipe manufacturers, and 
which has hereto from Turkey, in Asia Minor, his 

recently been found in New Mexico, and il xtreme scarcity 

which has characteri ed its production during the pasl few 

will, from present indication-. BOOH he at an end. The mines are 

located in the Diablo range .d mountains, about 20 mil- north- 
west of Pinos Alios, m whii Santa Fe Railroad 
run- from Deming. There have been stripped two true fissure 
veins, continuous for 1,500 feel each, in which 
between strongh defined walls meerschaum in widths of 20 
inches. All of the veins appearing are vertical in position, and 
give indisputable evidence that they were formed through the 
splittiiiir apart of volcanic conglomerate, a theory still 
confirmed by the blowouts .and deposits afloat that havi 
thus far discovered, and finally by the fact that "kidnt 
pure meerschaum in various Biases are now obtainable from tins 
surface material, although it has been subjected to the 
the elements, impregnation of vegetable 
and the seepage of other minerals in solution into it fot 

A wagon mad is new being buill from the in 
Finos Altos, a distance of 'JO mile-, and when this is completed 
the meerschaum will he marketed. 



The music at the Little Palace Hotel is a feature that 

lends much to the enjoyment of the visitor. The orches 
nnusu. 



The Canadian Bank of Commerce 



With which are amalgamated the Bank of British Columbia, the Halifax 
Bunking Co. and the Merchants' Bank of Prince Edward Island. 
HEAD OFFICE— TORONTO. 

Paid-up Capital ?10,000,000. Reserve Fund $5,000,000 

Aggregate Resources, over $113,000,000 

B. E. WALKER, President. ALEX. LAIRD, General Manager 

LONDON OFFICE— 60 Lombard St., L. C. 

NEW YORK OFFICE— 16 Exchange Place. 

BRANCHES IN BRITISH COLUMBIA— Atlln, Cranbrook, Fernle 
Greenwood, Kamloops, Ladysmith, Nanaimo, Nelson, New Westminster, 
Penticton, Prince Rupert, Princeton, Vancouver (3), and Victoria. 

iUKON TERRITORY— Dawson and White Horse. 

UNITED STATES— Portland, Seattle and Skagway (Alaska.) 

OTHER BRANCHES— Alberta, 26; Saskatchewan, 18; Manitoba, 20; 
Ontario and Quebec, 62; Maritime Provinces, 19. 

BANKERS IN LONDON— The Bank of England, The Bank of Scot- 
land, Lloyd's Bank, Ltd., The Union of London, and Smith's Bank Ltd. 

AGENTS IN CHICAGO— The First National Bank. 

AGENTS IN NEW ORLEANS— The Commercial National Bank. 

SAN FRANCISCO— Main ottlce, 326 California St. Branch— Cor. Van 
Ness and Eddy. 
A. KAINS, Manager. BRUCE HEATHCOTE, Asst. Manager. 



Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco 



Building at 7 06 Market St., Opposite Third. 
Guaranteed Capital, $1,000,000 Paid-up Capital, $300,000 

Surplus, $320,000. Assets, $10,000,000 

James D. Phelan, President; John A. Hooper, First Vice-President; 
lames K. Moffitt, Second Vice-President; George A. Story, Cashier; C. 
B. Hobson, Asst. Cashier; A. E. Curtis, 2nd. Asst. Cashier. 

Directors — James D. Phelan, John A. Hooper, JamesK. Moffitt, Frank 
J. Sullivan, Robert McElroy, Rudolph Spreckels, Charles Holbrook. 

Interest paid on deposits. Loans on approved securities. Deposits may 
be sent by postal order, Wells, Fargo & Co., or exchange on city banks. 



The German Savings & Loan Society 



526 California Street. 

Guaranteed Capital and Surplus - $2,603,755.68 

Capital actually paid up in cash ... | ,000,000.00 

Deporits. June 29, 1907 .... 38.156,931.28 
OFFICERS-President, F. Tillmann, Jr.: First Vice-Piesident. Daniel Meyer; Second Vice-Pres- 
ident. Emil Rohte; Cashier, A. H. R. Schmidt: Assistant Cashier, William Herrmann; Secretary, 
George Tourny; Assistant Secretary, A. H. Muller; Coodfellcw & Eells, General Allorne? t . 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS-F. Tillmann. Jr.; Daniel Meyer. Emil Rohte. I«n Sl.ijb.rt. I. N. 
Walter. N. Ohlandt. J. W. Van Bergen. E. T. Kruse and W. S. Goodfellow. 



The Anglo-Californian Bank, Limited 



Paid-up. $1,600,000 
Reserve Fund, $700,000 



Head Office — 18 Austin Friars, London, E. C 
Capital Authorized, $6,000,000 
Subscribed, $3,000,000 

The bank transacts a general banking business, sells drafts, makes 
telegraphic transfers, and Issues letters of credit available throughout 
the world. Sends bills for collection, loans money, buys and sells ex- 
rhange and bullion. 
ION. STEINHAKT, P. N. LILIENTHAL. Managers. 
. FRIEDLANDER. Cashier. 



Security Savings Bank 



316 Montgomery Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
Authorized Capital, Jl.0u0.000 Paid-up Capital. $500.0no 

Surplus and Undivided Profits, 1280,000 
Banking by mail a specialty. 

Directors — William Babcock, S. L. Abbot/ O. D. Baldwin, Jos. D 
Grant, E. J. McCutehen, L. F. Monteagle. R. H. Pease, Warren D 
Clark, James L. Flood. J. A. Donohoe. John Parrott. Jacob Stern. 



Central Trust Company of California 



42 Montgomery Street, Corner Sutter. 
Assets, 16.000,000 Paid-up Capital and Reserve. $1,760,000 

Authorized to act aa Executor. Administrator. Guardian or Trustee. 
Check accounts solicited. Legal depository for money In Probate Court 
proceedings. Interest paid on Savings Accounts at 3 6-10 per cent per 
annum. 



London, Paris and American Bank, Ltd. 



N. W. COR SANSOME AND SUTTER STS. 

Subscribed Capital, 12.600.000. Paid-up Capital. $2,000,000 

Reserve Fund. $1,200,000. 

Head Office — 40 Threadneedle SL, London, E. C. 

A.GJSNTS — New York — Agency of the London, Paris and American 

Bank. Limited. No. 10 Wall street. N. Y.; Paris — Messrs. Lazard Freres 

& Cle, 17 Boulevard Poissonler. Draw direct on the principal cities of 

the world. Commercial and Travelers' credits Issued. 

R. Albchul. Guhwr 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Crown Point Gold and Silver Mining Company. 

location of principal place of business — Sun Francisco. Cal. Location 
of works— Gold Hill. Nevada. 

Notice is h-rcby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, 
held on the >th day of June MSSmenl 'No. 97) of ten cents 

per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, payable 
i-nmedlately in United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the office 
of the company, room 916 Kohi Building. N. E. corner California and 
Montgomery streets. San Francisco. California. 

Any Blocs upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on the 
L'4TH DAY OF JULY 
will be delinquent, and advertised (or sale at public auction, and unless 
payment is made before, will be sold on WEDNESDAY, the 14th day 
of August. 1907. to pay the delinquent assessment, together with the 
cost of advertising and expenses of sale. 

r.v order of the Board of Directors. 

C. L. McCOY. Secretary. 

» 'ffice — Room 916. Kohl Building. N. E. corner California and Mont- 
gomery streets, San Francisco, California. 



28 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTEE 



July 13, 1907. 



Are Wt Progressing? 

itljrrr SliouiO far no Snam (Sfurn tbr JJcesuniBt 
U'.raham ffiono 



ENNEIN'S 



^C. BORATED 
O TALCUM 



There are some people in this world who take such a gloomy 
\ iew of things that they even pretend to believe that the human 
race is growing worse instead of better, backward instead of for- 
ward. They admit — because they can't deny it — that we are 
improving mentally, that our knowledge of things is widening, 
and that we are constantly improving the conditions under which 
we live. Beyond that, however, they will not go. Morally, 
ethically and as a Christian people we are gradually sinking 
lower and lower — if we are to take their word for it. 

Nobody who knows anything about the history of the human 
race is likely to agree with such theories, however. _ Even the 
rankest of pessimists, if he is an ordinarily intelligent man, 
knows that this statement is not true. We are better to-day 
than we were even one hundred years ago, and every century 
that has been recorded since history began to chronicle events 
has shown a marked improvement. 

Primitive man was cruel. He was cruel to his kind and to 
every animal upon which he could lay his hands, and no one 
can ever know how many centuries elapsed before the seed of 
tenderness began to sprout in the human breast. Thus, in the 
olden times, when men and women became too old or too in- 
firm to be of further use, they were put out of the way. There 
are some savage tribes that kill their aged and decrepid members 
to-day, but they are the exception. As a race, we don't do it. 
There was a time when the father had a perfect right to kill 
his child if he chose to do so. Mothers, too, were permitted to 
dispose of their infant offspring by exposing them in one speci- 
fied spot in the city. If anybody wanted to take the children 
and make slaves of them, well and good; if not, the dogs ate 
them. In the olden times we punished insanity with torture, 
and such crimes as witchcraft and heresy with the most brutal 
sort of death penalties. In those days human beings looked upon 
suffering and death as an amusing spectacle. The sight of a 
few innocent persons being torn to pieces by wild beasts gave 
them a good appetite for dinner. 

Compare such conditions with those that exist to-day, and 
then decide if it is true that all the advancement that the human 
race has made has been along mental lines. In the old days 
when men and women were so cruel of heart that they could not 
be kind to one another. They had no sympathy for those who suf- 
fered. They had no patience with infirmity. Even age met with 
no consideration at their hands. One can only imagine what 
they did to animals. We know that they cooked some of them 
alive, and that they beat others to death because such a method 
of slaughter was supposed to make the flesh taste sweeter. The 
rest of the picture is one that it isn't pleasant to think about. 

To-day, on the other hand, we have homes for the aged and 
the infirm, hospitals for the sick, havens for the destitute, and 
asylums where the insane are kindly treated. 'We even have 
homes where sick, homeless and destitute animals can have their 
wounds dressed, their ills treated, and their hunger assuaged. 
Whereas a few hundred years ago the human heart was practi- 
cally devoid of pity for human kind, to-day we cannot witness 
-uii ring, even in dumb animals, without trying to relieve it. 

LOVELY WOMAN. ' 

Shakespeare asks: "Who is't can read a woman?" Woman is 
the daughter of emotion; and when was emotion calculating or 
consistent? Woman without impulse would be without charm. 
As she is. she is a sort of social pate de fois gras, whose very in- 
digestibility constitutes her magnetism. Her intuition is the 
instinct of a mind as yet not disciplined by reason. The most 
beautiful woman would be uninteresting if she excelled in 
mathematics. When she becomes man's Bocial, political and 
scientific equal she will become so at the juice of her fascina- 
tion. Logic in petticoats would be a social scare-crow. Ij't us 
take her as she is. and thank her Maker: her uncommon senti- 
ment leaves no room for our common sense. Hvpatia was beau- 
tiful and excelled in philosophy, but she must have lacked that 
tenderness and trust which constitutes her sex's charm. What 
husband wants his wife to subject his two o'clock in the morning 
explanation to analysis? 



Powder 



PRICKLY HEAT, -i 

CHAFING, and 

sunburn, s?w■ ! ^z u <™• 

"A litllr hlohtr In prist. Btthiat, thin uieriblat latrtt- 
• at i mien for It/' Removci all odorofptnpl- 
jjhilul ilitr Shivlng. SuUcvcrywhcrc.ormillcd 
il of 25c. Cci Mcnncn't rihe origin,)). Simple Frtt. 
CEPJ1ARD MENVEN CO.. N.wufc. N. J. 



Heney accuses Harrison Gray Otis of selling the columns 

of his paper. It is suggested that Heney may strike a warm trail 
if he will investigate the Rubiconian's connection with the 
National Water and Forest Association and the Irrigation Dis- 
tricts of California. The statute of limitation cannot possibly 
have the effect of placing a limit on the scope of a general and 
thorough airing of the affairs of the doughty warrior in these 
matters. Go to it, Heney ! 



LUNCH AND DINNER 

at the Little Palace Hotel, at Post and Leavenworth, are meals 
that are worth while. All the care of a splendid chef, and the 
service of the old house, combined with an exquisite menu. 



JAMES 



Pacific Coast Branch 
BUCHANAN <& 

LONDON 



CO., Ltd. 



People of Refinement and Wine Intelligence 
ask for and drink PERRIER JOCET CHAM- 
PAGNE. Treat yourselves kindly and ask 
for (Blue Top.) 

VARNEY W. GASKILL, Pacific Coast Manager, 

Oakland, Cal. 



SI. 50 Books for 50c. 

We have just received several hundred differ- 
ent titles of late copyright fiction ordinarily sold 
at from $1.08 to $1.50. We have placed them 
on sale during the month of July at 50c each. 

Among the titles are: 

THE GREEN FLAG, Conan Doyle 
STRANGE SECRETS, Conan Doyle 
TRAFFIC, Thnraton 

CRIMSON CRTPTOGRAM, Tracy 

MISTERIOCS MR. SABIN, Oppenhelm 

CAPTAIN JACK.MAN, Clark Ruaaell 

WARD OF THE KING, Macquold 

HOISE WITH THE GREEN SHUTTERS, Green 

NEW GRI B STREET, Glaalno 

BLAKE'S BOOK STORE 

646 Van Ness Ave. Near Turk Street 




&ud%&JfJ%aunzuim^tJvi 



to* 

A Combined Food and Drink 

Eat POI and Grow Healthy in 
Body and Brain 
It Is Natures Best Remedy for Dyspepsia 
and Indigestion 

Nourishing and Strengthening 

Send 50c for a box by return mail. 

liOLDBERG BOWEN & CO. 

San Francisco and Oakland 
CALIFORNIA 



July 13, 1907. 



AND. CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



29 



LATE INSURANCE DECISIONS. 

The Supreme Court of Pennsylvania held, in the case of 
Foehrenbaeh vs. German-American Title & Trust. Company, 
that where one in possession of land and claiming a title in fee 
simple, applied in good faith to a title insurance company which 
issued to him a policy, and thereafter it was decided in partition 
proceedings that he had only a half interest in the land, and 
the insured because thereof voluntarily surrendered the prem- 
ises to a purchaser at the judicial sale, he might recover from 
the company, and that it could not claim that as he never had 
title to the half interest he suffered no loss. 

The United States Circuit Court of Appeals for the Ninth 
Circuit held, in the case of Brown vs. Merchants' Marine Insur- 
ance Company, that where one insured had an insurable interest 
in property covered by, and was therefore entitled to recover on, 
certain marine policies on disbursements and for increased value 
insured against total loss only, warranted free from average and 
salvage charges, and containing a policy proof of interest clause, 
the insurers having paid as for a total loss were entitled to share 
with other insurers in the distribution of a fund recovered as the 
result of a proceeding to fix liability for a collision in which the 
vessel insured was lost. The court further held that subrogation 
as between the insurers resulted by operation of the law from the 
mere fact of payment and did not depend upon the voluntary 
act of the insured, and that in an action by one insurance com- 
pany against the others interested in a loss on a vessel, to share 
in the amount received in an action for the injuries received by 
the vessel, it was no ground for discrimination against the in- 
terveners that the policies which they issued covered disburse- 
ments. 

• • • 

The Supreme Court of Ohio held, in the case of the Aetna 
Insurance Company vs. Stambaugh-Thnmpson Company, that 
persons dealing with one who has recently been a duly authorized 
and acting agent of another in the transaction of a particular 
line of business (in this case an insurance agent) have a right to 
rely upon the continuance of his authority to transact business 
of a similar character for his principal until they are in some 
way informed of the revocation of this authority. In this case 
an agent of an insurance company which had issued a fire policy 
on a slock of goods on which there was concurrent insurance 

prevailed upon the insured, after his authority as agent was re- 
voked, hut without knowledge of that fact on the part of the in- 
sured, to surrender the Brat-mentioned policy and to accept an- 
other for the same amount and on the same terms from another 
company for which he was agent. 'Phis the insured did in the 
belief that the agent still represented the first-mentioned com- 
pany. The court held that the insured had a righl to rely upon 
a continuance of the authority of the agent to represent the first- 
mentioned company; that the delivery of the policy to him for 
cancellation bound the company, and that the agent being duly 
authorized to solicit insurance hy the second company, and hav- 
ing delivered its duly executed policy as a substitute for the 

former one in the first-mentioned company, the second company 
was liable thereon. 

* * * 

A fire insurance policy provided that it should be void if. 
without written permission indorsed thereon, there should he 

allowed or kepi on the insured premises any one of certain enu- 
merated substances "or other explosives," and that no officer or 
agent of the insured should have power to waive such pi 
except in writing endorsed thereon or attached thereto. No in- 
dent was made on the policy. Blasting powder, which was 
not one of the explosives enumerated, was kept on the premises 
by tenants, and from an explosion thereof the building took tire 
and burned. The United States Circuit Court of Appeals held. 

in the case of St. Paul Fire and Marine Insurance Company vs. 

Penman, that the phrase "other explosives" must he construed 
to include blasting powder, anil that in an action on the policy 
it was error to admit parol evidence to show that the agent who 
placed the insurance knew that the building was cupicl 

by miners as tenant-: that thev customarily kept blasting powde" 
in their dwellings, and that he charged more than th 
miunt on that account, the tendency of such evidence being t« 
dish a waiver contrary tc the term* of th* policy. 



Fireman's Fund 

INSURANCE COMPANY OF 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Capital $1,600,000 Assets, $5,772,374.28 

Sansome and California Sts., S. F. 

Connecticut Fire Insurance Co. 

Of Hartford. Established 1850. 

Capital $1,000,000.00 

Total Assets ' 6,401.698.31 

Surplus to Policy-holders 1,922,306.24 

December 31, 1906. 

518 California St., San Francisco. Gal. 

Benjamin J. Smith, Manager 



Cash Capital. $200,000. 



Cash Assets, $546,555.61 



Pacitic Coast Gasualty Go. 

of California. 

Employers' Liability, General Liability, Teams, Elevators, Workmen's 
Collective, Vessels, Burglary, Plate Glass Insurance. 

Officers — Edmund F. Green, President; John C. Coleman, Vice-Presi- 
dent; F. A. Zane, Secretary; Ant. Borel & Co., Treasurers; F. P. Deerlng, 
Counsel. 

Directors — A. Borel, II. E. Bothln, Edward L. Brayton, John C. Cole- 
man, F. P. Deerlng, E. F. Green, I. W. Hellman, Jr., George A. Pope. 
Henry Rosenfeld, Adolph A. Son, William S. Tevis. 

Head Office — Monad nock Building, San Francisco. Marshal A. Frank 
Company, General Agents for California, Kohl Building, San Francisco. 

Founded A. D. 1792. 

Insurance Go. of North America 

Philadelphia, Penn. 

Paid-up Capital $3,000,00} 

Surplus to Policyholders 4,042,994.(1 

San Francisco Conflagration Losses paid 3,260, 000.C| 

BAILEY & JOHNSTON, General Agents, 

N.E. Corner Pine and Battery streets, San Francisco 



The Home Insurance Co., 



New York 



Cash Capital, $3,000,000.00 



Organized 1353. 

Insurance on personal effects of tourists and temporary sojourners 
anywhere in United States. Canada and Mexico. Insurance against loss 
by fire, lightning, wind storm or tornado. Indemnity for loss of rental 
income by Hre or lightning. 

H. L. ROFF, General Agent GEO. M. MITCHELL, Local Manager. 
38 Sutter St., San Francisco, Cal. 

British and Foreign Marine Insurance Co., Ltd. 

Of Liverpool. 

Capital $8,700,000 

BALFOUR, GUTHRIE A CO., Agents. 
416 Jackson Street. San Francisco. 



Continental Building and Loan Association 

Market and Church Street., San Francisco, Cal. 

In Business for 1 8 Years 

CAPITAL SUBSCRIBED - |1 5,000,000.00 

CAPITAL PAID IN AND RESERVE - - 2,481,317.50 

4 pet cent, paid an ordinary deporiu 6 per cent paid on term depont. lateral paid o» de- 
poal. nnce orjanizanoo over S2.5OO.OO0.0O. Call or write at any not. Alway. dad to 
answer question.. 

Wuhlntttrai Dodit PrMld.nt JoaepB O Crawford. M O lad Vie. Pre.ld.nt 

Jam.. MeColloin. in lie. Fw.id.nl Oartn "erl.b attorn., 

Willi. m Corbie. Sm', and 0*nl tUn.eer 



tfTS. Wlnslorv's Soothing Svnip for children's teething Is guaranteed 
tinder the Food and Drug Act Serial No. 10»8. 



PACIFIC TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY 



Capital $500,000 



F. G. Drum, President 



Murry F. Vandall, Manager 



TITLES EXAMINED AND INSURED | 



420 Montgomery Street 

San Francisco - - California 



30. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 13, 1907. 




The 

Tallac, 

Lake 

Tahoe, 

Gal. 



Gilroy 

Hot 

Springs 



Monte 
Rio 



The 
Palms 



Agua 

Galiente 
Springs 



■®e numerous small lakes and 
streams adjacent make this resort 
headquarters for rod fisherman. 
San Franciscans are especially 
invited to write for terms for their 
families. 

c7W. LAWRENCE C& CO. 
Tallac. 



Open the year round. The springs that HOLD 
THE RECORD for business during 1906. The 
Reasons: Wonderful curative properties of the 
waters; superb service; exce.ient table; easy of 
access. Every modern improvement has been 
added to this already famous resort. The wat- 
ers contain sulphur, alum, iron, soda, magnesia, 
iodine and traces of arsenic, and are very effi- 
cacious in cases of rheumatism, neuralgia, 
rheumatic gout, kidney and liver diseases, lead 
and mercurial poisoning and all bladder and 
urinary complaints. 

Hunting and trout fishing; amusements of all 
kinds. Our table is our advertisement. Rates 
$12 to $17.50 a week. Baths free. Trains leave 
Third and Townsend streets at 8:30 a. m. Direct 
stage connections for the springs. Send for 
booklet. Address W. J. McDONALD, Proprie- 
tor. 



Hotel 

Bon 

Air 


Newly renovated and now under first-class 
management. Plot and cold water In every room. 
Delightfully located in heart of Ross Valley. 
Take Sausalito Ferry to Escalle. Only 46 min- 
utes from San Francisco. Ideal home for busi- 
ness men and families. Open the year round. 
Terms reasonable. For further particulars ad- 
dress STRASSBURGER & PARKER, Postofflce, 
larkspur. Cal. 



THE SWITZERLAND OF CALIFORNIA. 
Most delightfully situated on banks of Russian 
River. Rates $2 per day. $12 per week For fur- 
ther particulars, address C. F. CARR, Monte 
Rio. Sonoma County, California. 



FOR AN OUTING ON RUSSIAN RIVER. 

510 per week and up. Everything good. 
Tents if desired. H. B. CROCKER, Healds- 
burg, California. 



THE nearest Hot Sulphur Springs to San 
Francisco. Largest lilineral water swimming 
tank in the State. No staging. 4 trains dally. 
For information, address THEO. RICHARDS, 
Agua Caliente, Sonoma County, Cal. 



SANTA CRUZ 

The Atlantic City of the Pacific 

World's most beautiful playground 

Never a Dull Moment 

Summer Season opens May 1st 



Grand Opening of New Casino and Bathing 
Pavilion announced later 



Hot 
Springs 



Witter 

Medical 

Springs 



The 

Geysers 
Hot 
Springs 



Skaggs 

Hot 
Springs 



Tassajara 

Hot 
Springs 



New Ownership and Management. Grandest 
and most accessible of all resorts. Only seven 
miles of beautiful staging. Waters awarded 
first prize at St. Louis Exposition. 

Natural hot soda, sulphur, plungeand tub balks, 104 to 116 de 
grew, for rheumatism, malaria and all stomach troubles. Iron and 
arsenic waters; altitude 1400 feet. Swimming tank, hunting, fin e 
fishing, bowling, tennis, croquet, dancing; gaa. Expert masseurte 
Round trip, $6. Rates, $10 50 to $16, baths included. Table 
unexcelled. 

Information at any S. P. office or H. H. Mc- 
GOWAN, Proprietor and Manager, Paraiso 
Springs, Monterey county, Cal. 



Witter, the most famous medical springs in 
the West. In the heart of the mountains, 
commanding a magnificent view of Clear Lake 
The automobile headquarters of Lake County. 
You can play tennis, ride, bowl, fish and bathe 
in the lakes or climb mountains. In Witte 
Springs you will find a first class place at a 
reasonable rate. 

Write for informilioo to \LBERT J. ARROLL. Manager, 
at the Springs, or to the General Offices of Witter Spring! Co,, 647 
Van Ness Ave.. San Francisco. 



America's greatest health and pleasure resort. 
Positive cure for rhumatism, stomach trouble. 
Natural mineral steam and hot mineral plunge 
baths. Tepid swimming lake. Good fishing and 
hunting. Climate unsurpassed. Our table 
speaks for Itself. All kinds of outdoor amuse- 
ments; dancing every evening. Livery and 
dairy connected with hotel. Rates, $10 to $14 
per week. Electric lights, telephone and post- 
office In hotel. Round trip tickets via North- 
western Pacific R. R. For further particulars, 
address R. H. CURRY, Proprietor, The Geysers, 
Sonoma County, Cal. 



SONOMA COUNTY. Only 4 1-2 hours from 
San Francisco and but 9 miles staging. Stages 
meet both morning and evening trains to and 
from San Francisco at Geyserville. Round-trip 
only $5.10. Terms, $2 a day or $12 a week. 
Reference: Any guest of the past 12 years. In- 
formation at Peck-Judah Bureau, 7S9 Market 
street, Bryan's Bureau, 1732 Fillmore St., or of 
J. F. Mulgrew, Skaggs, Cal. 



Monterey County. Best health and pleasure re- 
sort in California. Eighteen hot mineral springs, 
hot sulphur plunges; wonderful vapor baths; 
trout fishing; $12 to $14. Stage leaves Salinas 
Monday, Wednesday and Friday mornings. Peck 
Information Bureau, 789 Market street, San 
Francisco, or C. W. QUILTY, Tassajara Hot 
Springs. Monterey County. 



Jri.Y 13, 1007. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVEHTISER. 



31 







UNDER THE NEW MANAGEMENT 

of 

MARINER 8 CRAIG 

Write and secure rates for a long stay at the Springs. 
A new garage for the accommodation of Automobile 
tourists. Rates SI 2.00 to SI 6.00 per week. 









The New Hotel 




V f 


'"""TB HF^sr^* 1 


BIHflUP' 




L 


wv\ 






Vendome 

San Jose 




B 


i 




WL 


Thoroughly rehuil t and 
refurnished. Unexcel- 
led cuis'ne. Every 




B' uL n^^H 


\ 


, tj j 


modern convenience, 
charmingly located in 
hcautllul park, swim- 
mina pools, bowling 
alleys, tennis courts. 










commercial men down 


town. A delightful place to spend the lummer 
Addrew 


Rales reasonable. 

HOTEL VENDOME COMPANY 



WHEN IN LOS ANGELES STOP AT THE 



Hotel Westminster 



European Plan SI. 00 per day and up. 
With bath SI. 50 and up. 

Moderate Priced Cafe; Unexcelled Gaiiine; Centrally 
Located; 100 Rooms with Bath 

Fourth and Main Streets, Los Angeles. California 

f . O. JOHNSON. Proprietor 



Glenbrook 

LAKE COUNTY, CAL. 



In the heart of the forest. Good hunting and fishing. Pleasant 
drives and walks. Amusements of all kinds. Excellent table. 
Rates $10 to $14 per week. For further particulars apply to 
cTMRS. S. TREADWAY, Glenbrook P. O., Lake Co., Cal. 



Blue Lakes 



Send for pamphlets. $10 to $12 
per week. O. WEISMAN, Mid- 
lake, Lake County, Cal. 



The Original 
White Sulphur Springs 



Until New Hotel Buildings are 
erected guests can be accommodat- 
ed at private table, home plan, for 
limited number. Communicate 
with MR. and MRS. JOHN SAN- 
FORD, St. Helena, Napa Co.,Cal. 



Vichy Springs, 
Mendocino 
Go,, Gal. 



Celebrated for Beauty Bath. Pronounced by 
experts a natural skin beautifler. Write for 
booklet. J. A. REDEMEYER, Prop. 



Duncan 
Springs 



2 MILES FROM HOPLAND. Mineral waters, 
magnesia, soda, iron, sulphur and borax. Every 
comfort and convenience. Kates, $11 per week 
up. HOWELL BROS., Hopland, Mendocino 
County, California. 



Soda 

Bay 

Springs 

Lake Co., Gal. 



Situated on the picturesque shore of Clear 
Lake. Finest of boating, bathing, hunting and 
fishing; unsurpassed accommodations; new 
launch, accommodating 40 people, built ex- 
pressly for the use of guests and excursions. 
Terms*. $2 per day. $12 per week; special rates 
to families. Take Tiburon Ferry, 7:40 a. m., 
thence by rail to Pieta, then stage or automo- 
bile direct to springs. Rpund trip, good for 
six months, $9. Further Information, address 
Peck-Judah Bureau. 789 Market street, Bryan's 
Bureau. 1732 Fillmore street. Managers, and 
J. McBrlde and Agnes Bell Rhoads. Soda Bay 
Sprinters. Lake County, Cal.. via Kelseyvllle 
Postoffice. 



Howard 
Springs 

Lake Co., Cal. 



Cures all cases of kidney and liver trouble. 
The friend of the rheumatic and gout patient; 
42 mineral springs. Hot sulphur and Iron 
plunge haths. Magnesia tub baths. References 
— Any guest for the last twenty years. Rates. 
$12 to $16 per week. Fare from San Francisco, 
$9 round trip. Leave San Francisco 7.30 a. m.. 
via S. P.. or 8 a. m. via Cal. and Northwestern 
R. R. Send for catalogue, or address J. W. 
l.AYMANCR " twner and Manager. Howard 
Springs. Lake County. Cal. 



There's Only One Del Monte 

Golf, Sea-Bathing, Motoring. Parlor Car from San Francisco 
twice daily. Special week end rates. Free Art exhibition and 
sales gallery of California painters. Week end golf tournament 
during the summer. 

Inquire Peck-Judah Co., 789 Market St. Information Bureau 
Southern Pacific, Flood Building or Del Monte, California ,H. R- 
Warner .Manager, 



Ranchella 



An ideal home in the Santa Cruz Mountains, 
surrounded by beautiful grounds, five miles 
from Santa Cruz, in the Redwood belt. Beau- 
tiful drives, good trout fishing. Telephone, 
gas. $10. Address MRS. E. H. BUNTING, 
R. F. D. 87, Santa Cruz. Cal 



GOODYEAR RUBBER COMPANY 

R. H. FUSE, fYtStfett 

H»ve Returned lo Their Old Hone. Where Trar Were L«.led Before the Tire 

573-579 Market. Street., near Second 

Tel Tnnporarj;i7S8 



3* 



SAN PBANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 13, 1907. 



An Unterttaiumal Arabian Night 

By the Caliph O-lie-so-hard. 

The Pacific liner had just arrived, and the usual number of 
distinguished passengers, blooming Englishmen with cork hel- 
mets, well-fed missionaries without a mission, stern-looking offi- 
cers on furlough, filed down the gangway. 

As the Caliph wandered 'tween decks in search of the elusive 
thrill, his attention was attracted to a tall, cadaverous-looking 
specimen who was busily engaged in packing a large narra-wood 
box. He was heavily be-spectacled, and his appearance conveyed 
that indefinable yet unmistakable impression of the man who 
makes history. The two exchanged glances, and the Caliph 
passed on. 

The next evening, as he sat in an O'Farrell street cafe, dis- 
cussing a rarebit, this man with a supposed history spied him 
out. and, mellowed under the burden of a good American repast, 
introduced himself on the pretext of being a stranger in a 
strange land. 

Acquaintance under these conditions progresses rapidly, and 
at last the Caliph ventured lo ask him what occupation he had 
followed in the Orient. "What occupation?" he fairly shouted 
at him in reply. "I am a school-teacher from the town of Pil- 
dig, Luzon. Imbued with a desire to extend our glorious Ameri- 
can educational system in so far as my humble powers would 
permit. I decided to devote my life to that end. I have taught 
grown hombres that the world was round and not square, and 
they thought I was crazy. Modest female head-hunters, chid 
in well-fitting gee-strings, have lisped the English language at 
my behest, while their worse halves, built like brick-bats and 
endowed with the physiognomies of Burhank potatoes, have 
sweated blood trying to assimilate the fact that five and five make 
ten without the aid of sticks. I have demonstarted the fallacy 
>t( the superstition that the marriage of an American and a 
Filipino belle will result in a progeny of young elephants. I 
have entertained ladrones in my humble shack during the cool 
of the tropic evening, bestowing upon them all my worldly pos- 
sessions, and have chased them over the rice paddies the next 
day, clad in a shirt waist. 1 have attempted in vain to stop my 
prospective fellow-citizens from kneeling before, and rendering 
homage to, cartoons from the comic weeklies, depicting John 
I). Rockefeller as a saint, encircled with a glorious halo. I have 
lived on concoctions, the original ingredients of which are steeped 
in such appalling mystery as to defy all known methods of 
analysis, and must always belong in the category of Spenser's 
Unknowable. I hopefully look- forward to the time when a 
potential Congressman — fesus Bathatnoc — a graduate of mine, 
will represent Pildig in the Filipino Legislature." 

At this juncture the Caliph's nerve failed, and he sought *o 
make his escape, bul the dominie laid a restraining hand on his 
shoulder and continued: "My courage failed me. and I am back- 
in the United States. The hour of destiny is ai hand, and the 
approach of the firsl session of a Legislature beside which that 
of Venezuela is a model of propriety, sapped my nerve. I can 
flatter myself, however, that as a result of my efforts to graft 
a twentieth century education upon a tenth century root, I 
am — in conjunction with the Almighty — pari creator of several 
composite specimens of the genii- homo, who are unique, un- 
paralleled and unmatchable in a world of freaks." 

The Caliph lore out of the place and left him to finish his cafe 
noii- alone. 



HELD UP /.')' THE UNIONS. 

Thai smug apostle of discord ami anarchy, William Randolph 
Hearst, citizen of Nowhere, is in San Francisco. Now would 

be a good time to ask him if it is true that he stopped work on 
the Examiner building when the Trades Council fried to hold- 
up the Hears! estate. The Btory goes that he. (Hearst) refused 
lo kow-tow to P. U. McCarthy and others, and alter consulting 
with the estate managers, decided that it was too expensive a 
luxury to pay an extra toll for the friendship of McCarthy and 
his minions. WJiile counselling industrial disorder, Hearst is 
praying [or industrial peace ! 



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posits at the rate of three and three-quarters (3 3-4) per cent per annum 
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DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
California Safe Deposit and Trust Company. 

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on all deposits in the savings department of this company at the rate 
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branch offices located at 1531 Devisadero street, 2572 Mission street, 1740 
Fillmore street, and 19th and Minnesota streets. Dividends not drawn 
will be added to the deposit account, become a part thereof, and earn 
dividend from July 1, 1907. J. DALZELL BROWN, Mgr. 

Office — Corner California and Montgomery streets, San Francisco. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Humboldt Savings Bank. 
For the half year ending June 30, 1907, a dividend on all savings de- 
posits has been declared at the rate of three and eight-tenths (3 8-10) 
per cent per annum, free of taxes, payable on and after MONDAY. July 
1, 1907. Dividends not called for are added to and bear the same rate 
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W. E. PALMER, Cashier. 
Office — 646 Market street, San Francisco. 




g&B3 ?J*!J*I8®!9 




Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast. 




VOL. LXXIV 



San Francisco, Cal., July 20, 190? 



No. 3 



The SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor. Fred- 
erlck Marriott, at 905 Lincoln avenue, Alameda, California, and at 773 
Market street, San Francisco, Cal. Telephone — Alameda. 1131. San 
Francisco — Temporary 3594. 

Entered as second-class matter, May 12. 1906, at the Postofflce at Ala- 
meda, California, under the act of Congress of March 3, 1879. 

New York office — (where information may be obtained regarding sub- 
scriptions and advertising) — 206 Broadway, C. C. Murphy, representative. 
London Office — 30 Cornhill. E. C, England. George Street & Co. 

All social items, announcements, mining, commercial and financial 
news notes, advertisements or other matter intended for publication, 
in the current number of the NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA AD- 
VERTISER, should be sent to the Alameda office not later than Thurs- 
day morning. 

Commerce follows the biggest bug of gold. It knows 

nothing of flags. 

The public seems to have a frog in its throat when it 

talks about a new Mayor. 

Now that our Fourth is over, Russia may resume her 

bomb-throwing entertainment. 

"How long, Lord, how long!" This refers to Langdon, 

Honey, Spreckels & Company. 

It is to be observed that none of the grafters are giving 

up any of their tainted money. 

(According to Boxton's own testimony, he is eligible to 

play in Orchard's band of degenerates. 

We recommend Death Valley to those who do not like 

our invigorating fogs. We like them. 

Rockefeller can gel even with Uncle Sam by counting 

out pennies to pay that $29,000,000 fine. 

Two words, "easy money," are loading more young men 

to (heir damnation than the whisky shops. 

There is more tomfoolery and plays for persona] popu- 

Larit \ in the graft prosecution than is a led. 

The negro riot, germ and the Jap war microbe should be 

locked up together in a i>"\ of ignited sulphur. 

A Pomona "blind pigger" go! six months in jail and 

fine. He considers this Government a failure. 

Bryan asks, "What is a Democrat?" Bj looking in .1 

mirror he will see something thai is not a Democrat. 

Rudolph Spreckels's position in the graft business is that 

of a butter-in. Wonder what iie waul- lor Rudolph. 

It is to be observed thai Japan's head has been growing 

smaller since that warship movement was annourn 

— . — "Don't lie afraid of working overtime," says an employer. 
Bul liow il i'. 1- rertime? It is important toknowth.it. 

Jus! lio» tar Hearst is respi Japan's yellow 

press would be hard to tell, but no doubt for nearly all of it. 

Apparently, uol main Presidential booms survived the 

Fourth of Julj orations. Il was a suspender-bursting occasion. 
We began to build a navy during Cleveland's administra- 
te the ship that we haven't lost much 

lime. 

— • — Admiral Si i :i t he is too bus 

a Presidential nomine des, he may lie needed to thrash 

Japan. 

Schmitc has n d Judge Dunne 10 let him off 

while he conducts his campaign for another term, but h 
ft to. 

Up in Maine they have a man by the nam 

Perhaps be lives in a prohibition town, and 
bis name reflects !i - - mind: likewise the state of his 

stomach. 



Los Angeles is still talking about that bunch of school- 
marms, but. they have been gone only a week. 

Rockefeller is now willing to admit that big as the Stand- 
ard Oil Company is, it is not as big as the United States court. 

'tdie fall fashion will be bleached hair and kalsomined 

faces for the smart set, but of course a few other things will be 
worn. 

The new pointed bullet has the advantage over the old 

round one in that it will kill more people and thus end the war 
sooner. 

The fact still remains that the fields of common labor 

on the Pacific Coast are greatly in need of several droves of 
Asiatics. 

."My father lives in the clouds with God," says Roeke< 

feller's daughter. True enough, but he keeps his business offiej 
in this world. 

A Texas fisherman reports having captured a trout whose 

mouth was fifteen inches wide. lias any one missed a San 
Francisco labor leader? 

In feeding the llagi 1 lemons, the nations forge! thai 

a few of their family do nol like lemons, and are ill a position 
to refuse io eat them. 

When the future historian reaches San Francisco he 

.will please omit the name Boxton in naming the list of Mayor-. 
We want io forget him. 

Meanwhile. Cornelius continues to draw $465 a month 

for running the Carmen's union, [sn'l il amazing how some 

■ ■ii jo] being gull 
The Qovernmenl 1- getting ready to hand out some more 

lemons to the trusts. All right, bul be careful thai no po 
lemons are in the basket. 

It is funny how quickly the Korean and Japanese Exclu- 

Cluh shut its mouth when talk of war began. Thi 
scrip! law i- still operative, though. 

Rocki .. Monev ]- not the i 

The United S rt is a whole lot bigg 

Rockefeller's money, anyway. 

Thi- le a had year for political flowers in this 

town. They are fading rapidly, but a lot of them have money to 

- low that they were in the garden all right. 

I minimum 

was eight dollars, and that a -nit of clothes would buy a lot of 
privileges. And the prosecution made him Mayor! 
— 1 — Presumably arrangements have been made 
Schmitz and lluef separate coll-. However. 

\ed conversational privileges 10 am nt. 

A woman's journal recommends that courting should I* 

red until after marriage, which 1- all very nice, but the 
danger of being caught by the wife rather fun. 

The Hag! 

see no reason why they 5 - battle- 

- owners w how their 

.1.. 0. ■ 

1 ban on tl - - but a "liti 

- - ' kept on h -c of a sna,-. 

than in.o 

Japan's 

lures, in. - 

And 
some people actually belie 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 20, 1907. 



EMtflrial Ghmutttttf 



All Greet the New 
Mayor. 



After much travail to find a new 
Mayor for the city and county of 
San Francisco, the Districi At- 
torney has selected a man who may 
be trusted to carry out the duties involved under his oath of 
office, and to carry them out to the letter. Mayor Taylor will be 
no man's puppet, and the blow has almost killed Willie Hears! ! 
The smug apostle of anarchy thought, for quite a while, that 
he would be asked to name the new Mayor, and when Langdon, 
the gentleman who does not stay put, refused point blank to do 
anything to please the versatile Living Menace to Public Peace, 
Hearst almost bit himself in two. His staff to-day is filled up 
with the venom of ridicule, and spews it on the public through 
the Examiner, and hence the city "descends from a fiddler to 
a poet." This is one of the ivw incidents in farce-drama that 
almost reconciles the News Letter to the oligarchy of Spreckels. 
Not that we love Spreckels more, but that we execrate the Living 
Menace to Public Peace, as all law-abiding good citizens Bhould. 
Would that it had stayed in New York, along with Colonel Har- 
vey, its twin in deviltry. 



Now that Mayor Taylor is in charge 
Signs of Disintegration, the graft prosecution has come to 

the parting of the ways. The News 
Letter long ago predicted thai the day would come when a 
division would occur, and that the men who were patriotic for 
revenue only would soon see that they could no longer train witii 
the crowd that is really intent on the rehabilitation of San Fran- 
cisco and the punishing of the guilty. Another element that 
widens the breach in the harmonies of the prosecution is the 
Spreckels faction, which is seeking profit and vengeance a I the 
same time. Heney and Burns are out of it when it comes to the 
doing of ward polities. They had nothing to do with the naming 
of the Mayor. Hearst is trying to coerce Langdon into severing 
the partnership between himself and the other reformers, and 
would like to take him on the hill at Sausalito, and carefully 
covering his cloven foot in order to allay his suspicions, point 
over to the fair city and beyond that to the fairest Stale, and 
Bay unto him: ,r Look ! there is my universe; take thou thy 
choiee." Langdon, contrary to his record, is still true to Hie 
extra-legal Mr. Spreckels, and, besides, he is afraid that the per- 
petual political candidate from Guadalajara, Sausalito, Gotham 
and elsewhere cannot deliver the goods. 



Defections its the 

Axti-Graets. 



The plans of the graft prosecutors 
have been seriously upset by the de- 
sertion of the Examiner. For nine 
months the daily newspapers ac- 
cepted the programme arranged for them without comment. The 
impertinent probe of the yellow press was laid aside while Spreck- 
els, Heney and Langdon devised, outlined and finally executed 
their scheme to get possession of the Municipal Government. 
They succeeded, but just at the moment the spoils were to be 
divided, the split came. The Examiner demanded more than its 
share, and the result is a repetition of the familiar story. Willie 
Hearst is personally blamed for the split. While he was in New 
York, it was easy for Heney to keep his representatives in line by 
holding over them the big stick in the form of an indictment. 
Hearst's tools corrupted the primaries three years ago. and the 
price of immunity has been the unqualified support of the 
Spreckels programme. But Hearst, who always has an eye open 
for political advancement, got wind of the situation and hurried 
\\'e-t lo turn to his own advantage. From the time he reached 
here three weeks ago, the prosecutors have been in a flurry. II.; 
lost no time in delivering his ultimatum. 



Tut: Piji.dii anient or 
the Pbosecution. 



When the prosecution made the at- 
tempt t~ shift the responsibility and 
the job of naming a Mayor all .it 

the same time, it should 'have I ,, 

accommodated, and the commercial and labor bodies of San 
Francisco should have stepped right up to the pie-counter and 



made their selection. Tlie Xews Letter suggested, in as mild 
a way as possible, last week, that San Francisco is and always 
has been, cursed with a lack of unity. There is no singleness 
of purpose, and while many may not agree with the weak and 
vaccilating Mr. Langdon. the District Attorney hit the nail 
squarely mi the head when he said that we were still torn by dis- 
sensions and still swayed by factions. Physically, San Fran- 
cisco forge- ahead, and despite the miserable tactics of its best 
citizens, is still the Queen of the Pacific. The News Letter 
made mention of the fact thai the remarkable advance of Los 
Angeles was due to a oneness of purpose, a unity that conquers 
all obstacles when the welfare of the City of Angels is concerned, 
and before which all private interest- have to sink into the back- 
ground. Oakland has. id' late, developed just such a spirit, and 
Ihi' improvements now going on. and the material prosperity 
being experienced by its citizens, is due to the fact that this 
spirit of amity and concerted endeavor is now being fostered by 
the big brains of the sister city across the hay. It is just possi- 
ble that Mr. Spreckels and Mr. Langdon knew beforehand that 
the projeel would abort, and that they chortled to themselves a- 
the commercial and labor bodies proceeded to play their game. 



The TJltim ut m of 
S i.ss \fras Bile. 



"Name Langdon or Dwyer for 
Mayor, and 111 do the rest." was the 
■ ut Spreckels. Xow Hearst 
docs mil care alioul advancing the 
interests of these ea ml i. lal es. Iiul he does care about the Inde- 
pendence League, thai hybrid organization which has been repu- 
diated in New York. Langdon and Dwyer have been identified 
with the organization — Langdon as the Gubernatorial candidate, 
Dwyei as the chairman of the State Committee. Willi either in 
the Mayor's chair, Hearst imagines he can build up a machine 
between now and November that will insure victory and perpetu- 
ate the party. 

Spreckels. who does not relish doing Hearst politics, promptly 
turned down the suggestion. Bed and yellow calcium burned 
in the Examiner office for the next three days. Hearst declared 
he would have revenue. At first the news columns mildly fore- 
told the change of policy, then a fault finding editorial, and fin- 
ally the mask was thrown aside in a broadside denouncing 
Spreckels. Heney and Langdon. Spreckels is doubly grieved be- 
cause he believed lliat the protection given the Examiner entitled 
him to its support. It is the first time he has experienced the 
"rule or ruin" policy by which that newspaper i- managed. 



Buying «f Peisiaiues. 



But he is also revengeful. The 
crimes charged to Dent Robert, the 
fat apostle of yellow mange, manag- 
ing editor of the Examiner, and Jack Barrett, hoodlum incom- 
petent, the news editor, m buying up the primaries for the "horse 
and cart" movement in 1904, will nol expire for another month. 
They will mosl probably he Heneyized. The prosecution asserts 
the evidence is complete, and when it is submitted to the Grand 
Jury, indictments will be returned. It is now their purpose to 
submit the evidence and ask- for the arre-l of the two Hearst lieu- 
tenants. While this evidence has been in the hands of Heney 
for many months, it has never I n submitted to the jury, not- 
withstanding i he false exoneration published in the Examiner 
when the initial elfoil was made to have the investigation pro- 
ceed. 



While the prosecutors are fighting 
A Detective's Nepotism, the Examiner, they siill remain a 

happy family. There have been 

rumors of internecine quarrels, but only eel - of the bickerings 

hue reached the public. Detective Burns keeps his hand on the 
$100,000 fund, and he is taking care of himself and his own 
while it is there. I'.esides his own salary of $13,000 or $1.5,000 
a year, he has managed to find employmeni for his three sons. 
George, the eldest, ie a sort of a chief of staff for his father: Ray- 
mond is chasing around the East in search of Detwiler, the ac- 
cused bribe agent of the Home Telephone Company, while Sher- 
man, the youngest, is one of the guards employed to watch Abe 
I'm' f. Elisor Biggv, Sproekels's handy man, is also inking care 
of his own. What salary f'.iggv i- I" receive has nol been fixed. 
hut he has found a good position for Ins -on. For a while young 
Biggy was also a Ruef guard at $5 a day. hul now he has been 
transferred to Burna's staff ler Borne kind of a nepotic com- 
pact with the detective. 



July 20, 1907. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



Pulling Chi stnutb 

TOR HeNET. 



This delightful game whereby 
others pull chestnuts out of the fire 
for the chivalrous Mr. Heney, is one 
thai the attorneys for the defense 
have been playing with a great deal of success. Desiring to have 
it made clear beyond any possibility of legal equivocation, Mr. 
Heney forces Dinan'a attorneys to appeal to the courts to estab- 
lish the fact, and it is now absolutely settled that Dinan is an 
appointee of the Mayor, and subject to dismissal. It seems odd 
that the attorneys opposed In Mr. Ileney should show so little 
knowledge of tactics. It is, of course, not necessary to know 
much law to force a man into a false position. It is doubtful if 
Heney and Langdon are deeply versed in the art of avoiding re- 
sponsibility, otherwise known as law. It is certain, however, 
that Heney, Burns and Langdon are very clever manipulators of 
events, and that of the three score lawyers opposed to them, Dot 
any one has shown himself a master of the use of technicalities. 



The Glass Trial 
Fiasco. 



The refusal of Mr. Zimmer to testify 
in the Glass trial, the falling down 
of Krause and the general weakness 
of the case against Glass, will result 
— it is expected — in the case being dropped or the finding of a 
judgment of not guilty. Lawyers are laughing at the evidence 
presented, and saying that the trial of Glass is a fiasco. The 
prosecution announced long ago that this was its strongest case, 
and its very evident weakness is a general surprise. There was 
apparently no need of the quibbling and technicalities raised by 
Delmas, who, by the way, does not shine with more effulgence 
than a tallow dip in this case, to gain, at least, a popular acquit- 
tal for the accused telephone official. 



At the Political 
Ckossways. 



The News Letter said last week that 
the prosecution had arrived at the 
crossways. From now on, the vari- 
ious elements that have combined 
to kill graft, to obtain franchises, to wreak vengeance, and, in- 
cidentally, to rule to govern or to ruin, will travel differeni 
paths. There is to be a general shake-up, and the possibility of 
a triangular newspaper row is welcomed by the defense. 



MARE Twain and the It_has long been held that the Eng- 

Knglish. lish have no sense of humor, and 

thai the American joke is to them a 

deep and dark mystery. This seems to have been disproved by 
the wonderful reception that Mark Twain has received in Eng- 
land. Royalty received him, he was banqueted l>\ statesmen and 
Literary men. Oxford conferred the degree of doctor of laws on 

him. Everywhere he went he was cheered and applauded, an! 

the papers were full of his witty sayings. I lis speeches « 
ported in lull, and his everj acl was the subject of comment. The 

longer he stayed in England the better the people liked him, and 

when he embarked for home, e\cn the stevedores cheered him, 
No literary man ever before had sin li a reception. So, we musl 
abandon forever the idea that the British do not care for Ameri- 
can humor. At least they care for the Mark Twain kind, which 
is of the best. They were almost equally enthusiastic forty years 
ago over Artemus Ward, who proclaimed that 

nienl of bis life was when he W8S invited to write for Punch. 

There is a ccrtam type of American humor, appreciated by a 
lot of cur people, an<l unappreciated abroad. This finds i - 
in the indescribably vapid and inane pictures published in the 
Sund.n sup "i daily papers. There is haidlv a sem- 

blance of humor in them, their main appeal being to the type of 
people v, io think that i - funny. Let a series of horribly 

daubed and worse drawn illustrations end in somebody being 
i over a cliff, or chewed by a dog, or kicked by a mule. 
Or cracked over the head with a club, and that great foolish mass 

called the common people will fairly shriek in glee. V 

is all T The same people are pleased by the repulsive 

nitres of national types to lie found in some of 
called comic papers. They think that the caricatures of Jews. 
Irish and \ funny, when they are merely brutal. 

is no subtlety, no wit about them — merely the coarsest oi 

ion. They have all the ear-marks of malice. 

humor differs from much 
that is accepted in this con- 1. I: 

is meant to make the reader laugh, not to make the subject of it 
squirm and wince. And it ; s this kind of humor that brought 



laurels to Mark Twain and Artemus Ward. They did not use 
racial characteristics as a basis for their wit ; they did not ridicule 
a man because certain blood flowed in his veins. Kindliness is 
the chief characteristic of both of them. And it is because of their 
kindliness, of their intense human sympathy, that both these men 
received an overwhelming reception in England. 



The gentle shepherd who herds the 
An Unconstitutional State deer, dueks and dog-fish, who 
Law. stocks the ponds with trout, and who 

makes it impossible to the poor man 
to enjoy duck dinners, game hunting, the pleasures of the chase, 
except within prescribed prohibitive limits, is busy enforcing the 
"hunting" law. A Russian gentleman paid $35 the other day 
for a tin badge which entitles him to shoot and hunt, within cer- 
tain restrictions. A Galifornian or a resident American citizen. 
of California, is assessed one dollar for the same privilege. A 
resident of any other State in the Union is mulcted for $5, pro- 
viding he is sojourning temporarily in California. No citizen 
of any State in the Union is entitled to any more or less consid- 
eration under the law than any citizen of California. California 
has no constitutional or legal right to make such a law, creating, 
as it were, a privileged class of the Californians, as against the 
citizens of Maine or Louisiana. The law is unconstitutional be- 
cause under the reading of the most favored nation clause, to be 
found in nearly every treaty with a first class power, the rights 
and privileges guaranteed to any citizen of the United States are 
the rights guaranteed to foreign residents or transients, except 
the right to vote and hold office. How many times will it be 
necessary for the courts to affirm, and well-informed journals to 
state, that the treaty is the paramount law of this land. Califop 
nia, in its attempt to enforce special, sumptuary and class legi* 
lation, not only breaks the covenants between the States, but ij 
inviting trouble with foreign Governments. It is a stupid law, 
and should be tested at the first opportunity by some individual 
with back-bone enough to tell the game wordens to go to the 
devil ! 



These are rough anil stringent 
The Boahi) of WORKS. tunes for the Hoard of Works, which 

finds itself unable to employ i 
free and easy way of spending the city's money. As tlm 
now. when the Board wants an appropriation, the question is 
asked, "What for? (live the full particulars." Immediatel; 
the Board becomes as shy as an unkissed maiden, sticks its Snge'l 
in Hs mouth, and ly, "Aw. now. we don't want 

• lust hand over ,i I to it all right." The 

history of the various Boards of Works that have been inflicted 

on San Francisco is that they have attended to the cash all right, 
but they have not attended to their work. The money paid for 

- b is, as s i « b, '"'en in exi • ■ imount p.. 

public improvements. Even the restrictions that have been put 
upon the present Board have not altogether curbed its was 
tendencies. Repairs on the Hall of Records have cost twenty-five 
eve the estimate. President Unify said the work would 

rat (82,000, and could no: more than 

$84,000. The coat has been $100,000. This is because there 
were no competitive bids, the contracts being given out piece- 
meal in jobs of less than $500. This - explained, 
to expedite matters. Pretty expensive expedition! The 

i is being employed on the cast wing of the City Hall. 
for the repair of whi. - - available. Then there is 

an immense amount of street repairing to be done. Although 

ard of Works is to be under restraint en 
from enjoying the rich pi former years, there is no 

doubt that it wiil manage to waste a considerable amount of 

rious appropriations that it will handle. 



It is to be observed from afar and from near-by that 

Hiram Johnson is always a polite gentleman, no matter how 
re the other lawyers in the gra Lk and 

act while in court. 



Of all the men in San F e prosecution deemed 

i the most worthy and the better qualified man to play 
Mayor for a few days. Oh. no. there is no poli - prose- 

doing thi: 



6 



SAN FEANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 20, 1907. 



The News Letter has had occasion, 
Treaty Eights Supueme. in the not far distant past, to pub- 
lish the treaty between Japan and 
the United States, and to call attention to the fact that this 
treaty was a simple, easily read and understood business ar- 
rangement. Japan has never broken this treaty by the infrac- 
tion of its slightest stipulation, and it is not strange that it 
should demand the same treatment in return. It is a sham, thai 
one great nation should have to apologize for the actions of the 
citizens of one of its largest cities, in reality, in comparison 
with the res! of ibis land, not amounting to more than a hit 
small grease spot on the map. and to admit that, although claim- 
ing a better state of civilization for its people, it cannot compel 
the citizens of that one city in observe the stipulations of a Bol- 
emn compact and the ordinary rales of decent usage. In other 
words, the United States must admit, because of the miserable 
conditions that obtain in San Francisco, that it cannot keep its 
house in order, and then announce to the world at large that it 
will place a modern armada in the Pacific to defend thai riotous 
child against any just chastisement by the aggrieved party for 
its indefensible actions. The News Letter does not lielieve that 
there will be any war with Japan, because it believes fully in 
the wisdom of the rulers at Washington, and it argues that it 
will be much cheaper to discipline the "unwhipped mob" in 
San Francisco than to go to war with a friendly nation over 
such stupid and unrighteous processes. The News Letter be- 
lieves in the good sense of the statesmen el' Japan, ami it knows 
that Japan has had its own mobs to handle and its jingoes, an. I 
furthermore, that Japan, although victorious, has too recently 
passed through war to relish another experience. Fortunately 
for both nations, the Emperor of Japan will not be swayed 
by the dictates of party urgency and need. 



It is not because of any superiority 
As to Asiatic Labor. in the quality of labor delivered 

that the farmer wishes to east his 
vote for a law that will allow a limited entry to the Asiatic. 
Asiatic labor is not a cheap labor, ll is highly expensive labor, 
because it is slower, because ii is less intelligent, ami. strange 
as it may seem, arrogates to itself rights of which white men 
never dream, but because white labor, the right kind of farm 
labor, does not exist in California, if it were possible to trans- 
plant, in huge bulk, the white labor of North or South Dakota, 
the apple grower of Michigan, the Missouri farm band or the 
sturdy sou of Minnesota, California would blossom to such an 
extent in a decade thai all the hordes possible to import from 
China ami Japan could not match by fifty years of work. But 
this kind of white man's workman is not to lie bad on the 
Pacific Coast, and particularly in California, and dependence 
must lie placed on the Asiatic. Asiatic labor is expensive. Jap- 
anese labor is essentially expensive because it keeps pace in its 
demands with a-U the increase in pay asked by the white man. 



San Francisco's 
Prosperity. 



San Francisco is not cursed with 
-hikes in the midst of hard tune.-, 
but during an era of unexampled 
prosperity. Its mechanics and its 
street car men. its telegraphers, its telephone girls and all the 
other elements that have temporarily paralyzed its functions, 
are not striking because of starvation, or because of poverty of 
pay, but because of the Pact that, having raised the scale of 
wage to such an extent that capital can no longer stand the 
strain, they now practically demand the confiscation of capital 
itself. It is a form of socialism brought on by excessive pros- 
perity, a sort of rabies which, if unchecked, will bring ruin on 
every one. The wage scale in San Francisco is the highest in 
the land. and. if the presenl disturbed condition is soon allayed, 
the city will go forward as never before. There is a limit beyond 
which capital cannot go in satisfying the demands of labor, and 
that limit has been reached in San Francisco. The cure for the 
insane agitations of the politicians who govern the supply of 
labor is more labor and of a better quality. We have bad a 
practical lesson in the fact that in San Francisco the cars are 
now manned by expert men and not by uniformed hoodlums, 
by men who apparently regard the running of a ear as a trade 
and not as a condescension to the public. The change is an un- 
expected revelation. We should have thousands more of these 
self-reliant, self-respecting men in all branches of industry. We 
should have a thousand Pat Calhouns to help in the regeneration 



of San Francisco and to furnish the necessary decent industrial 
element to leaven the mass, become riotous by too much pros- 
perity. 



Mi:. EeaRST lit 

Nowhere. 



Mr. Hearst is directing a campaign 
in order to force the District Attor- 
ney under his thumb, and Mr. 
Hearst is making a big lizzie of the 
job. Mi-. Hearst of Nowhere is at present residing al Sausalito, 
and is reposing in the shade of the sassafras live while lie dic- 
tates bis messages to his lieutenant. He supposed when be came 
from New York, that a brass band would meet him at the ferry 
and that he would be bailed publicly as the friend of labor and 
the deliverer of graft-ridden San Francisco, lie was surprised 
at the lack of enthusiasm, and finding the city l lusty, he re- 
paired to Sausalito, where one may or may not lie accommo- 
dated with a silver bath-tub, and where one does not suffer the 
inconveniences that face the common people who dwell in the 
city. From under the sassafras tree emanate the orders of the 
lieutenants, and the Yellow Messiah sils on bis bill and waits 
the answer from the public. The unfeeling public pays no at- 
tention to the antics of the lieutenants, and there is a gnashing 
of teeth in the sassafras grove. 



Is it possible for the average San 
Otjb Provincialism and Franciscan to rise above the ordi- 

NABEOWNESS. nary bickerings and the cheap tea- 

table gossip and entre nous of local 
provincialism? If it is possible for the San Franciscan to rise 
above the habit, then it will be possible for him to grasp the 
commercial mastery of the Western sea. and it will lie possible 
Eor bim to stretch his trade to take in the icy north, but ii will 
not be possible for him to do these and oilier large things unless 
lie divests himself of the incubus of doubt and suspicion thai Mr. 
Spreckels has fastened upon him. The San Franciscan is him- 
self tired of the continual unrest. The public at large is more 
than tired of the row that is continually making merriment for 
the world. Is it not about time that the people hike :i hand, 
and that the factions making us ridiculous step aside. We are 
not only being made ridiculous. Inn we are losing ground all 
around; we arc losing time that never can be regained, and we 
are deliberately doing all these things for the amusement of a 

parcel of individuals who have broughl a g 1 cause into the 

marsh of Cross Purposes, where they are gee-ing ami baw-ing 
lo tbe ultimate disaster of all concerned. 



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facture of their products. Bagle Brand Condensed Milk and Peerless 
Biand Evaporated Cream (unsweetened) have received highest awards 
w herever exhibited. 



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None but skilled tailors are employed in makirg ihe standard in clot* es 
which we have on sale here. We don't use any artifice except that of 
"quality" to invite you to our shop, and we candidly believe we show 
the very best ever. 

Correct clothes correctly constructed containing every intent of merit, never need lo be 
slaughtered. It's the down-trading merchant* who are responsible for the (act, that makes 
merchandizing a lottery- Those, who are strangers lo honest methods, "Throwing out a 
sprat to c*lch a herring," etc. Well!! we like "our way" of doing business. 



KI,NG SOLOMON'S HALL, 

Fillmore Street, near Sutter, San Francisco 



July 20, 1907. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



©If? iUuttater nf Jfarngn Affairs 

Six Disturbing Events. 

Events the last week have shifted interest from the Hague to 
the individual nations, and from now on the work of the conven- 
tion is likely to be listless and perfunctory. And it may be said 
that the nations represented in the convention are glad that it is 
so. Enough has been developed at the Hague to warn the nations 
that problems were likely to be forced to the point which might 
reate entanglements that would be difficult to escape from. 
These events may be named: 1. The decision of the United States 
to transfer pretty much the entire naval force from the Atlantic 
to the Pacific waters ; . A positive declaration from Tokio that, 
under no circumstances, would the Japanese Government con- 
sider the ratification of a treaty with the United States that con- 
tained immigration restrictions ; 3. The suggestion of the United 
States that international claims that are in dispute be referred 
to a board of arbitration; -A. The almost point-blank refusal of 
the Latin-American States to agree to the suggestion of the 
United States ; 5. The refusal to permit the question of decreas- 
ing the armaments to be discussed, and ti. The demand of Turkey 
that the Red Cross Society substitute the crescent for the cross 
on Turkish territory. 

These six events have thrown all the nations "out of court," 
so far as the Hague is concerned, for they must be settled by 
diplomacy between individual nations. So far as transferring 
our navy to the Pacific Ocean is concerned, while it is in a sense 
a warlike movement, it is not so in fact, but it is a degree of pre- 
paredness for eventualities which any nation is justified in mak- 
ing under similar circumstances, and therefore even Japan could 
not consistently interpose objections. Nor could the transfer 
rationally be twisted to mean the beginning of a hostile move- 
ment against any nation, for on the face of things it is merely 
prudence suggested by commerce, Asia being the future field of 
commercial battles for trade expansion by all nations. The 
best analysis of the influence that the leading event is likely to 
exert comes from British diplomatists. They reason the trans- 
fer of sixteen or more battleships with a full complement of 
cruisers and smaller war craft to the Pacific must by the very 
nature of things be a permanent mobilization. This will neces- 
sitate the duplication of the present fleet for service on the At- 
lantic, and when the Panama Canal is completed, it will be prac- 
tically one fleet, and second in guns and ships to England's navy. 
It is England's way to figure on to-morrow's possibilities rather 
than on those of to-day. If England's forecast is correct, in 
ten or twelve years the United States might be mistress of both 
oceans, for her interests abroad are not nearly so extensive anil 
wide apart as those of Great Britain's, nor her ships so widely 
scattered, It is in this probability that the British diplomats 
reckon with America's new naval policy. In this connection, it 
may be said that it will be the largest movement of warships, as 
one fleet, in the history of the world as to gun power, displace- 
ment and speed. 

The second evenl means that Japan would sever diplomatic 
and commercial relations with the United stales before main- 
taining Eriendlj relations according to a treaty that did not g 
to Japan the same immigration, naturalization and business 
rights in America thai are secured to the most highly favored 
people of Europe. Inasmuch as our Government has already 

violated the treaty of 1894, and repudiated the decision of the 

Supreme Courl <>i the United states of 1789, Japan has the 
right, under international law. to amend the existing treaty and 
not wait until 1910 for it to expire by limitation. But Tokio 
will do nothing of the kind just now — not for a few years, any- 
way. She is nol to enter into a long-drawn-out war. 

The third and fourth events are very full of meaning. Should 
the Latin Stales yield to the suggestion of the United Stat • 
arbitrate international claims, they would be surrendering their 
Drago doctrine, which is the only defense they have other than 
by armed force to keep from being made to pay "fake" claims. 
The Drago doctrine, as the News Letter has pointed out several 
times, Joes n<>! reuogni e claims as valid until the Supreme 
Court of the debtor State passes upon their validity and pro- 
nounces them honest and fair. 

The fifth event, the refusal of the Hague conference to permit 
the question of reducing the armaments of the nations to be con- 

ven remotely, is well known, for it was a foregone 
elusion before the conference was organized, though some days 




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ago it was tacitly agreed that practically all the nations had 
adopted the policy of the greatest possible preparedness for war 
in the surest way to preserve peace between the nations. That 
policy is almost openly contradictory, as the delegates do not 
hesitate to admit. When the prize-fighter is prepared in every 
way to enter the ring, it is hard for him to keep out of it. 

The sixth event, the insistence of the Sultan of Turkey that 
when upon Turkish soil the Red Cross Society shall substitute 
the crescent for the cross as its badge of identification, looks more 
like a joke than a serious event, but the Hague delegates think 
otherwise. In fact, it is likely to culminate in very serious things. 
The indications now are that the demand will be rejected prettv 
vigorously, and it is very clear that if rejected, 'rni].'\ »ill quit 
the Hague in a hull. So sure are the nations of Europe that 

events are rushing Turkey to the point of unbearable insolence 

where her downfall by armed "intervention" and the division of 

her empire will be justified, that Russia is already concentrating 
troops on the Turkish frontier, ostensibly to "suppress insurrec- 
tions," but iii reality to be close at hand when the "I ime cornea." 
The fact that the Hague Congress bas despaired of accomplish- 
ing anything of a substantial nature shows the influence of these 

six event-. 



POST AND LEAVENWORTH 
Becomes famous, since it is the location of the Little Palace 
Hotel. The grill is the great drawing card as it was in the old 

days. 



Pacific Coast Branch 
JAMES BUCHANAN <& 

LONDON 



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People of Refinement and Wine Intelligence 
ask for and drink PERRIER J 01 ET CHAM- 
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LITERATURE O.N APPLICATION 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 20, 1907. 



Gfotljam <tas?ru> 

Bv the Provincial. 

Governor Hughes has announced the names of the members 
of the New York City and State Utilities Commissions, which, 
under the law creating them, became operative on July 1st. Post- 
master William R. Willcox, of New York, is to be chairman of 
the City Commission, and Mr. Prank R. Stevens, of Jamestown, 
of the State Commission. The longest term of service is to be 
five years, and .he idea is to have one member of each commis- 
sion retire each year. The salary of each commissioner is 
$15,000, which is as much as the Mayor of this city and the 
Governor of this State receive. 

This double-headed commission is more or less an experiment 
in the line, of public service, and the public awaits with much 
concern the practical working-out of the plan. L'nder the new 
law these commissions are granted almost arbitrary power in 
their right to regulate and control the corporations supplying 
public utilities, such as transportation, gas, electricity, etc. 
Whether they will use this tremendous power pro boiw publico, 
without fear or favor, or whether they will degenerate into mere 
hirelings of the corporations, remains to be seen. In any event, 
it is certain that the Governor has done his level best to appoint 
men whose records are clear of corporate or political stain, and 

so far so good. 

* * * 

New York has just passed through an icemen's strike and a 
garbage collectors' strike, both of which appeared to have been 
precipitate and not at all organized. At any rate, both brought 
about serious inconveniences, and in the case of the latter, con- 
siderable danger to the public health. Garbage and refuse piled 
up in the streets in all sections of the greater city, and the only 
way to dispose of these piles was to burn them. Accordingly, 
young America proceeded to enjoy the unusual experience of 
lighting bonfires at a time of political inactivity, and days before 
the glorious Fourth had arrived. For several nights the streets 
of £*ew York resembled huge military camps or Virginia bar- 
becues, though the odors and fumes arising from the tires could 
scarcely by the utmost stretch of the imagination be likened to 
those of roasting pig or beef. Anyhow, the strike broke, the city 
was cleaned up in record-breaking time, and now the Health 
Department breathes a sigh of relief. The ice strike was invol- 
untarily settled by the American lee Company, another monop- 
oly, employing strike-breakers under police protection, thus 

forcing many of the strikers to return to work. 

* * * 

The robbery of more than $96,000 from the Windsor Trust 
Company by its paying teller, Chester B. Runyan, the other day, 
was one of the coolest and nerviest "steals" engineered in this 
country in a long time. It was Saturday, when banks and trust 
companies close at noon, and their employees usually go out of 
the city for a little trip, liunyan was therefore not suspected 
for an instant when he went around among his fellow-workers, 
bade them good-bye, and stated that he was going to visit his 
mother in Rochester, who was ill. He picked up his dress-suit 
case, which was crammed with bills taken from the trust com- 
pany's vaults, and leisurely walked out of the front door, never 
to return. The police and detectives of three nations arc on his 
scent, but as he had two full days' handicap, there is a probability 
that he may never be caught. A sad accompaniment of this case 
is Runyan's desertion of his innocent young wife, though it may 
turn out that she will join the fugitive later — that is, if the 
police will let her. The French rule, cherchez la femme, might 

be invoked to trap the defaulter. 

* * * • 

Professor James H. Hyslop, of the American Society for Psy- 
chical Research, has unearthed numerous frauds masquerading in 
Windsor, Nova Scotia, among the credulous and superstitious as 
marvelous phenomena of the spirit world. A well known Eng- 
lish magician. Hcreward Carrington, is now assisting Professor 
Hyslop in his work, and it was Carrington who discovered the 
fakes that were passing counter in the Canadian town as "pol- 
tergeist disturbances," "apports," and other crude imaginings 
of the spiritualists. Reduced to earthly facts, they were nothing 
more nor less than tricks which even a third-rate prestidigitator 
would be ashamed to practice before a backwoods' audience. 

A few days ago the newspapers contained an account of the 
separation of Professor Hart, of Lafayette University, the noted 



chemist, from his wife and children, the cause being the devotion 
of -Mis. Hart to the principles and practices of Christian Science. 
It appears that their eldest son, the father's favorite, a senior 
at college, a young man in whom their proudest hopes were cen- 
tered, fell ill with typhoid pneumonia, and died because Mrs. 
Hart called in Christian Science "healers" instead of a compe- 
tent physician. The seriousness of his son's condition was hid- 
den from the Professor until it was too late to render effectual 
aid, and it is quite probable that the boy, with ordinary medical 
attention and proper nursing, would have recovered his normal 
health and strength. After the son's death the Professor's wife, 
instead of perceiving the falsity and futility of the "healing" doc- 
trine, adhered to it more firmly than ever. Her husband's sound. 
scientific reasoning and passionate pleading were in vain. Eddy- 
ism had buried its fangs too deeply in her mind and heart to 
imagine that any man's argument, however sensible and strong, 
was going to remove its noxious poisons. 

So the broken-hearted man, fighting against these poisons as a 
brave man should, was forced to put her from him; nor did the 
Scientists spare him the solace of his two remaining sons, but 
inoculated them also with the deadly virus. The net results of 
its ravages, in this one case, may be summed up thus: the killing 
of a most estimable, promising young man, the severing of an 
otherwise happy family, and the rupture of a home; the blight- 
ing of a brilliant professional career, the loss to the world of a 
great mind with all of its possible achievements, and the break- 
ing of a good man's heart and spirit. For Professor Hart an- 
nounces that he will resign his chair of chemistry, than whom 
none can fill so ably, and retire to some secluded corner of Eu- 
rope, there possibly to pass the remainder of his days in un- 
merited oblivion. 

It is indeed a sad affair, marking one more count in the very 
long indictment against the cult of Mrs. Eddy. The Hart case 
is but one of hundreds, perhaps thousands. The time has come 
to call a halt — to put an immediate end to this remorseless mur- 
dering of the innocents under the guise of "healing." Religious 
Freedom never countenanced quackery, and that is what the 
prayer treatment for pay amounts to. A law should be passed 
by each of the States, and in all countries where "prayer treat- 
ment for pay" is practiced, absolutely forbidding such malprac- 
tice under penalty of confinement in State's prison. 1, for one, 
propose lo bring this matter to the attention of Governor 
Hughes and the New York Legislature, and ascertain if it is not 
entirely constitutional to forbid murder under the thinly-veiled 
name of ••religious healing." I do not deny that Christian 
Science has ils good points: it has. But its prayer cure lor dis- 
ease has proven a rank failure, and must be stopped before it 
kills off many more good Christians. 



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July 20, 1907. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



PLEASURED 
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'"hfciter-ooiKtottfatfifoasurw' 



Colonel "Ed." Price is married. 1 am in receipt of an en- 
graved invitation to the wedding. Also I am in receipt of a 
photographic likeness of a must winsome woman. II seems that 
Price wished to avoid publicity and systematically set about the 
task to make it an impossibility for his friends or the newspaper 
men to get an inkling as to his intentions. 

The arrangements for Ihe wedding were planned so secretly 
that not even the closest, friends of the parties obtained any 
inkling. Their companions on in automobile trip, ostensibly for 
an afternoon's outing, were amazed when the machine was halted 
at the First Methodist Church, in Mount Vernon. The Rever- 
end Dr. Ortho F. Bartholow was waiting in the vestry, and the 
ceremony was quickly performed. Then the newly wedded 
pair whirled over to the Hotel Gramatan in Bronxville, on a 
bridal tour, which was extended to Atlantic City. 

This is the sequel to a romance of the Actors' Fund Fair last 
monHi. Cathrine Countiss, a vivacious, magnetic young leading 
woman of personal charm and keen executive skill, was chair- 
man of the Professional Woman's League racing wheel. She 
had charge of a dozen of the prettiest actresses in New York, 
but none more charming than herself. There was always an 





.MiSS EEEIE SHANNON' AT IHE NEW ALCAZAR THEATRE. 

enormous crowd plunging on the little tin gee-gees, which ran 
true to form. The wheel cleaned up a bigger profit than any 
other feature of the fair, not excepting Mrs. Stuyvesant Fish's 
flower booth. 

Price was the fair's hard-working promotion manager, and 
secured hundreds of columns of newspaper publicity from ocean 
to ocean. He also edited The Spectator, published daily by the 
Friars. On the opening night of the fair, suffering from brain 
tag. he strolled over to the racing wheel far distraction, and he 
found it. Miss Counties smiled bewitchingly as she -old him 
a ticket Price won $5, but lost bis heart before the wheel 
stopped spinning. So vigorously did Ihe promoter promote his 
suit that before the week was over, there was an engagement. 
But no one was taken into their confidence. 

Cathrine Countiss is Texan-born, and educated in B Maryland 
convent She is on ■ of the three daughters of Judge and Mrs. 
T. .T. ( Henison. .Tn . i lt> ■ Crooks, jurist, legislator, edi- 

tor ami derate lighter, lias been prominent in | ! 

velopmenl oi Northeasters Texas for the past thirty years. The 
portrait oJ Mi-- Countiss, which appc - 2 of ibis issue, 

\<as .me of the Ihrce hung in the Texas building at the St. Louis 
Exposition. 



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10 



SAN FRANCISCO \ T EWS LETTER 



July 20, 1907. 




EZRA KENDALL IX SWELL ELEGANT JONES AT THE VAN NESS 
THEATRE, COMMENCING SUNDAY NIGHT. 

Herbert Kelcey and Effie Shannon scored a popular triumph 
this week at the Alcazar in "The Moth and the Flame." The 
play is a poor vehicle in which to show the abilities of these two 
splendid atage favorites, but it is certainly a winning: card with 
the mob. Miss Shannon took the part of Marion Walton, and 
Mr. Kelcey dressed, acted and lived the part of Edward Flet- 
cher. Marion Walton in "The Moth and the Flame" is a settle- 
ment worker, who is loved by two men, Dousrlas Rhodes and 
Edward B. Fletcher. The latter is successful in his suit, and the 
ceremony is begun, only to be interrupted and the marriage 
thwarted. Miss Walton endeavors in the final act to persuade 
Fletcher to see the error of his ways, and marry the woman he 
has wronged, and in this she is finally successful. She ultin 
becomes the bride of Douglas Rhodes. 

In the church scene in the second act, when Fletcher is 
brought face to face with his treason, he denies his victim, and 
hi? bride-to-be, Mis? Walton, believe? him until he strikes the 
woman whom he has wronged. Then it is that all the love in 
Marion Walton's heart for Fletcher is killed and the ceremony 
is indefinitely postponed. 

In the days of the old "Central" Theatre, the house would 
have been crowded to the doors, and the play continued for two 
weeks. The critical and hypercritical were disappointed, except 
as to Mr. Kelcev's grooming and clothes. 

* * * 

Maude Adams will give Ko?tan<V? "L'Aiglon" at the Greek 
Theatre at Berkeley on Saturday evening, the 7th. This will 
be Miss Adams's farewell appearance on the Pacific Coast, and 
will be the most conspicuous event to occur in the Greek Theatre 
in some time. The entire affair, as usual, will be under the aus- 
pices of the university authorities. Miss Adams will be sup- 
ported bv the same company that surrounded her for the San 
Francisco performances of "L'Aiglon." This will be the only 
performance of Rostand's celebrated Napoleonic drama in this 
part of the country. 

* * * 

Madeline Lucette Riley's funny comedy. "A Coat of Many 
Colors." with Mr. Herbert Kelcey and Miss Effie Shannon in 
the leading roles, will be the attraction this coming week, and 
a more complicated farce was never written. 

Esther Gunning, the heroine of "A Coat of Many Colors." is 
a lawyer, who. for business purposes, has changed her name from 
Fairbourn to Gunning, because she is her father's business part- 



ner. Her mother she has never known. Her father sends her on 
a mission to New York to locate a certain Mrs. Majendie. She 
locates her. and finds that Mrs. Majendie is her mother. In the 
interval, however, a thousand things happen. Miss Gunning calls 
'in a Family named Wallboys at their home at Cedarwood. There 
h meets the hero. Herman Wallboys, who because of his ability 
i gel into numerous outlandish scrapes, and because of his 
changeable nature, is called Joseph. It is from this fact that 
the play gets its name. Herman's brother Hamilton has been 
?ecretly married to the daughter of the owner of the country 
h ime next to the Wallboys. Between the two families there is a 
feud over some property, and the married ones endeavor to keep 
the ceremony a secret. Herman aids them, and is mistaken for 
I olea's husband. 
Mr. Herbert Kelcey will play the role of Herman Wallboys, 
while Miss Shannon is casl as Esther Gunning. 

* * * 

l a Kendall, tlie foremost exponent of genuine wit. humor 
Mid comedy now before the theatrical public, begins a Pacific 
Coasl lour at the Van Ness Theatre on Sunday night, duly 21st, 
md will continue there for two weeks. He i= appearing this sea- 
•I'ti in "Swell Elegant Jones." a three-act play whose scenes are 

laid in Southern Indiana, ami i- supported by a company of 
twenty players. Despite the tact thai Mr. Kendall is in evidence 
mosl of the time, and besides his line? in the regular play, de- 
livers, ihiring the second act. his famous monologue. "My Pace 
Slipped Out of My Hand." there is a plot of intense human in- 
terest. "Swell Elegant Jones" is "fun show" pure and simple. 
and like everything else Mr. Kendall lias ever been connected 
with, is absolutely free from the slightest suggestion of vul- 
garity. There will he Saturday matinees onlv. 

* '* * 

Alan Hale cables from London that he just can't resist the 
musical charm of "The Merry Marsovian Widow." He has seen 
the pretty opera in no less than four countries during his trip 
abroad. Mr. Dale says: "All Europe has been dancing to 'The 
Merry Widow* waltzes for months." The London correspondent 
of the New York Herald says: '"The Merry Widow' is the hit 
of the year in England, and American theatre-goers will be 
pleased to learn that the hit of 'The Widow' in London is our 

own Joseph Coyne. 

* * * 

The week beginning this Sunday matinee will be a red letter 
one at the Orpheum, for the bill to be presented there contains 
among its new acts five of the very best in vaudeville, two of 
which are headliners of extraordinary merit, dame? Neill and 
Edythe Chapman Neill. chief among the newcomers, will be 
most cordially welcomed, for the play-going public has long de- 
lighted in their efforts, and from experience knows them to he 
artists of genius and refinement whose constant aim is to elevate 



COR. SUTTER AND 
STEINER STS 



New Alcazar Theatre 

ABSOLUTELY "CLASS A" FUILDXNG. Tel. West 603V 

BELASCO & MATER, Owners and Managers. 

Commend n( Hondnr July 22nd. 

Nineteenth week of tha Nlhv Alcazar Stock Company presenting 

MR. HERBERT KELCEY AND MISS EFFIE SHANNON 

In Madeline Liiccltc Ryley". Domedj 

A COAT OF cTWANY COLORS 
Prices — Evening. 25c. to $1; matinees. Saturday and Sunday. 
26c. to 60c. 

To follow— THE IDLER. 
Coming— Denl* O'SulHv.n the Irish Actor 



Orpheum 



El. I IS ST.. NEAR FILLMORE. 
Absolutely Clui A 
Theatre Buildlnc 



Week beginninp thl- Sunday kfUrnoon, July 21 nt 

RED LETTER VAUDEVILLE 

JAMES NEILL AND rDYTHE CHAPMAN NEILL. THE STUNNING GRENADIERS. Roberts, Unyen 
and Roberta. Gaston And Green. Les Jardy. WILLARD SIMMS and Co.. Mailer. Cbunn and 
Muller. New Orpheum Motion Pictures and last week and tremenduous iuccmi of BENJAMIN 
CHAFTH n* ABRAHAM LINCOLN. "IN THE WHITE HOUSE" 

Prices— Evenings, 10c, 25c, 60c, 75c. Box seats. $1. 
Matinees (except Sundays and Holidays), 10c, 25c, 60c 
Phone. West 6000. 



Van Ness Theatre 

GOTTLOB. MARX * CO.. Props, and Mgrs, 



CORNER VAN NESS AVE. 



AND GROVE STREET 

Phone Market U>0 



Two weeks beginning Sunday night July 2lrt. 
Matinee Saturday only. 

EZRA KENDALL 

in the Fun Show 

"SWELL ELEGANT JONES 

Seat* GOc to $1.60 

Wnlch for "The Prince Clmp.' - 



July 20, 1907. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



11 



the profession of which they arc such brilliani ornaments, and 
to present to their audiences only the verj best in dramatics, 
Their contribution will consisl of a one-acl comedy by Julian 
Street, entitled "The Lady Anns-; the Hall." The other head- 
liners will be Jesse L. l.asky's vaudeville success, "The Stun- 
ning Grenadiers," an elaborate production embracing four 
scenes, four complete changes of gorgeous costumes, and many 
bewildering ami novel effects. Although the entire production 
was made in London and Paris, it is the result of some clever 
and original American ideas. It is headed by Meredith Meredro, 

the American prima donna, who created a sensation in the Lon- 
don music halls. Roberts, Haves & Roberts will introduce their 
laughing comedy sketch, "The Cowboy, the Swell and the Lady,"' 
which affords them full scope for their versatility and ability. 
Billy Gaston and Ethel Green, who were features of the "Babes 
in Toyland" and "Wizard of Oz" companies, will furnish a skit 
entitled "Pots of Musical Comedy." Mr. Gaston is the author 
of "(ice. But This is a Lonesome Town," and other song suc- 
cesses. Benjamin Chapin, in his inimitable impersonation of 
Abraham Lincoln, has made a great hit. Les Jardy, two famous 
French acrobats, will also make their first appearance. 

* * * 

Ethel Barrymore will close her engagement at the Van 

Ness Theatre with the performances on this Saturday afternoon 
and night. The charming actress has won a distinctive success 
in her performance of Mme. Trentoni in Clyde Pitch's fan- 
tastic comedy, "Captain Jinks." The Saturday night and Sat- 
urday matinee performances will have as an additional feature 
the one-act play of ''Carrots." I remember seeing this delightful 
creation of Miss Barrymore's in New York, and I recommend 
you all to see it. 



RAILROADS VS. THE PUBLIC. 

To I lir Editor of the News Letter: 

Whenever a change is made in the routine of doing anything 
under the control id' a railroad, there must be some good, al- 
though a generally hidden, reason for making the change. This 
may be safely accepted as true because the average traffic mana- 
ger, just the same as the average freight clerk or railroad messen- 
ger boy, hales change. The average railroad man, the man who 

learned the trade of railroading "from the ground up," is the 
most hide-bound, narrow-minded, tnarried-to-the-corporation 

jackass that ever lived, lie would sacrifice his wife and child- 
ren, crucify his grandmother and disembowel his father-in-law 
rather than break the rules that custom or railroad tradition 

has handed down. The refusal lo transfer or accept oar.- 

from Southern Pacific to Santa Fe tracks at Oakland i- a case 

in point. There is no smse whatever in this regulation, and 

much loss of time and money to the patrons and the railroads, 
but because, in the lime of some railroad Balboan. it was de- 
cided that lo facilitate the transaction of business W8E a d 

ous practice, and might lead in too much prosperity, 

■ el' the idiol who first devised iln- rule hat elk ed to it 

u i 1 1 1 a .i range religious fanaticism. 

The man who arrived at the conclusion that a could 

only carrj leer automobiles has established a rale, and it is sus- 
pected that this will go down thi custom, 
-lied without good reason, luu to lie revered until dyna- 
mite or competition will compel a revi I down 

i\ .-.Die pett] official, to the everlasting annoyance of all drivers 
o( ears. 

Lnothei : petty annoyance int n the public 

is the removal of the foot-n ; trains. The f ■ 

not only a comfort, hut are an aid to health. In the winter. 
are wel an ger may keep his 

ry, and short-legged women derive a great deal ol 
from the same convenience. S JE decreed their re- 

re lias been constant grumbling 
and a demand for their return ever sine,'. At this writing, no 
move has been made to replace the foot ri 



IDEAL COUNTRY BUNGALOW 

and Country Home Table Outfits 



For your 



Summer Outing and Country 
Home 

A complete assortment of novelty designs moderately priced 



Dinner Services 

on display in 

Our China Department 



NATHAN-DOHRMANN CO. 

1520-1550 VAN NESS AVENUE 



All the windows on the local trains haye been eleated and fast- 
ened down. The ears are poorly ventilated, and during the hot 
days id' summer much ill-health' results from the fact that fresh 
air cannot be let in on the sweating, unhathed crowd. I 
breaths taint the air. and disease is the result. There is a 
stronger howl and growl about the fastening down of windows 
than there is about the foot-rests, and yet nothing is done. 
Should one of these ears overturn during a night run every pas- 
senger would he hurih . before belp could lie extended 
or the passengei ■ I from i losed cara. 

Of course, there must be a good railroad reason for the fast- 

e iiie b indovi -. the re ral of t reste and the - II ol 

escaping a, e i, but why do m tie take 

us into ifidence and publicly proclaim the benefit to be 

derived from the foul air and 

PRO BONO PUBLICO. 



KENDALLISM8. 



"You've made a fool of me. but I'll show you whal 1 am," 
-ays the discomfited miech in "Swell Elegant J 

"Vou don't have to show me." answers Ezra Kend 

o](l 1110." 

» » » 

"A real man never makes real love but once in a life-ti 
!?>t is an imitation." — Kzr.i Kendall in 

* * * 
"Yon can't eat wisdom, observi iwd lawyer in "S 

I you can't cat without it, • Ezra 

Kendall — just like that. 



A score or moe .s in the B 

would ho a sight 



Something New 



The Sultan Turkish Baths 



Post St., between Taylor and Jones 



Entire 7 3tory 
class ^A fire- 
proof building 
devoted to the 
luxuries of men 



13 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 20, 1907. 




''.''A.'^lt 1 ^''- 



LOOKER ON 






;■ i n <" ■ ■ ■ ,yj iV X ' - ' " i, ' - " .'^ 




So Father Yorke is in the East preaching for Schmitz. Yorke 
could do much harm if he were not known. But he has attained 
such preeminence in mendacity that even the naked truth mean- 
dering through his brain gathers a variegated garb. I wonder 
if he could recite the multiplication table without investing it 
with confiscations of Dante-like fancy? What does Peter want? 
His defense of Schmitz reminds me of what Macaulay said when 
a fraud was upholding another fraud: "A forged endorsement 
on a counterfeit bill." David said in his haste: "All men are 
liars." If he had taken Fathev Yorke for a sample, he could 
have said it at his leisure. But Yorke's vaporizing? are wasted. 
His friend is in jail, and will soon be in the penitentiary. 
Requiescat in pace! 

Do the dying fear death? I have seen many die, but have 
never seen one afraid to go. The majority are unconscious for 
a Ions time before death. But there are exceptions. A eon- 
verted Hindoo, speaking of the death of his father, said to me: 
"When he die I awav from home. But 1 ask the preechair, if to 
go he feel happy, and the preechair he say: "~N T o. by God, he raise 

h 1 !" The bitterness of death is past before we reach the 

threshold of eternity. The whole truth of the matter is. there 
is no sentiment about death, and though we are immortal. «re 
die as the beast dieth. Tine dying sayings of great men are 
coopered up in the brain of biographers. I was at the death bed 
of the most intellectual man I ever knew. Just about the time 
he drew his last breath, a dog fight occurred outside, and his last 
words were "sick 'em!'' Now, how would that look on a ten 
thousand dollar monument! The last words of a great man 
means no more than the first squall of a new-born baby. Neither 
knows what he is talking about. 

* * * 

Tlow easy it is to find a prophet who foretold something every- 
body now knows. Since our earthquake, which I thought scared 
all our liars out of town or into truth, the "T told you =o" 
man has been much in evidence. Some say they consulted th E 
planets: others secured their data from spirits. But all knew 
the earthquake was coming. One man "knowed it 'ea'se he seeV 
it in the atmosphere." There is something very restful in a 
cheerful liar. ("Leader" please copy.) One reason why a 
prophecy sometimes hits the bulls-eye is because there are so 
many prophecies. Everybody prophesies on something, and if 
the prediction fails, the prophecy is forgotten. If il turns out to 
be true, the prophet is not without honor. Tf our earthquake was 
not foretold, perhaps, it was the only thing that has not been. 
Talk is cheap, and prophesying is the cheapest grade of talk. 
The onlv real prophets are astronomers, who say what they 
mean and say it so everybody knows what they mean. But who 
honors an astronomer for telling the truth? 



formerly rented room now harbor from two to five lodgers, and 
if it had not been for these accursed strikes, there would be more 
business. When this trouble began, San Francisco was enjoying 
an intoxicating whirl of prosperity never known before. Think 
of it! A large city thrown into convulsions by a filthy, ignor- 
ant mob — egged on by a vulgar fellow who uses his office to stir 
up the passions of this crowd. What comfort has the Examiner, 
for its friends who are mired in the mud into which they were 
inveigled by that paper? In my judgment. San Francisco is 
going to be a model city : she is going to be governed by out- 
representative men. We have lasted mob rule and the test has 
been a profitable lesson. It will be a long time before business 
is upset, and our city made a laughing stock again. As to strike-, 
the car fiasco has been a lesson that even the working man will 
remember. 

Governor Vardaman, of Mississippi, has been saved from the 
wrath to come. He publicly announced at a revival meeting at 
Jackson, Miss., the other day that he had determined to lead a 
better and nobler life. The negro preachers and negro populace 
of the South will wait with bated breath to see this statement 
materialized into action. The dance of the mad dervishes would 
be silent as a death watch compared with the spectacle of the 
erstwhile negro-hating Governor leading an African Methodist 
church camp meeting. 

* * * 

It. is easy to read between the lines that a stale of war still 
exists in Mindanao, the richest and second largest island of the 
Philippine group. Only last week a severe fight occurred between 
the Americans and the Moros. in which several Americans lost 
their lives. The Filipino of the Northern islands, having a 
veneer of Christianity, may in time absorb the principles of mod- 
ern civilization, but the Mohammedan Morn, a fanatic to the 
death, will have to be practically exterminated before the re- 
sources of Mindanao can be developed. The missionary can 
make headway with the amenable Filipino, but his efforts arc 
wasted on the Moro. The real seat of Government of Mindanao 
lies in Mecca, and the presence of the pig-eating American is 
a continual source of irritation to the faithful. These savages, 
to a man, will die for an idea, a trait which has practically dis- 
appeared among the materialistic Caucasians and Christianized 
Malays. 

Remember what I said of Schmitz running Eot Mayor if he 
could get out? Did you read what be said of accepting the nomi- 
nation? As to that court room applause, bless your heart, the 
same asses thai brayed applause to what he said when he and 
Yorke were posing as mob MoseBes were on hand to bray applause 
when he was sentenced, and would stand ready to bray applause 
if he ran again for Mayor. I pay no more attention to those ani- 
mals than I do to a weather cock veered about by the breath of a 
sewer. In the meantime, the cars are crowded, and Funston is at 
the Presidio when we want him. Ever see regular troops handle 
a mob ? No ? I have ! 

* * * 

Air castle building is mental druiikonne--. There is not one 
man in a thousand who can concentrate. Concentration is every- 



Wte have come to the sane conclusion that happiness is not only 
tin aim. but the aim. Old-time folks fancied that to be good one 
must be more or less miserable. Laughter was the invention of 
the devil, and cheerfulness the preparation to sin. Yet there is 
less drunkenness, more charity, greater and more frequent acts 
of benevolence than ever were known. What did those old duffers 
know of institutions for the prevention of cruelty to animals? 
orphan asylums? lunatic asylums, etc.? Fifty years ago every- 
body was too busy looking after the soul to care for the body. 
Now we care for both, and we know there is such a sin as physi- 
cal blasphemy. If a man wasn't crazy when he entered an old- 
time asylum, he was before death released him. 

As to Orphan asylums, the superintendent of the Hebrew Or- 
phanage remarked to me: "Twenty-five years ago anything was 
good enough for an orphan: now, nothing is." We hear more 
of crime nowadays because we hear everything. Crime, poverty, 
drunkenness and general cusscdness have decreased fifty per cent 

the last century. 

* * * 

I often hear the question : "Has our population decreased ?" 
No ! We have more people than we ever had. Houses that never 



HANDKER- 
CHIEFS 

Men's fine French 
sheer linen handker- 
chiefs— e cru back- 
ground with borders 
and figures in helio, 
tan, blue and green. 

Bullock & Jones 

Company 

Van Ness at Eddy 



July 30, 190? 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



13 



thing. For this reason, the man without imagination always has 
' besl of ii among common folks. Imagination is inseparable 
from originality. Inn it is a hindrance to memory. Few mathe- 
maticians are imaginative; naked truth invites dissection, not 

fancy. Imagination in a mathematician would be like ] try in 

a chemist, imagination is a good servant but a bad master. Un- 
checked, it becomes infinite, and it is never safe to invade in- 
finity. We send our fancy on a hunt after ideals until it is over- 
stocked with unattainable material. Then we wonder that we 
achieve nothing solid. There is sufficient attainable ideals; why 
not use them? We are never satisfied till we create seme impos- 
sible model. It seems to be human nature. Anything that can 
be used smacks too much of the earth earthy. Who worships 
the knowable? respects the comeatable? 

Flammarion has been philosophizing on dreams. Do dreams 
foretell? Why should a man know more when asleep than when 
awake? Dreams are often caused by indigestion; a mince pie 
just before retiring may be responsible for an apocalypse. Can 
prophecy come from a stomachache? Prescience from a colic? 
Is inspiration born of a snore? Your visions are regulated by 
your bill of fare, and to look to a dream for future information 
is like relying on delirium tremens for data in natural history. 
Man has ever looked to a disordered mind for supernatural wis- 
dom. The ancients held the insane sacred. Even now we arc 
often at a loss to distinguish between lunacy and the idiosyn- 
cracies of genius. 1 iind that when I sleep on my back I dream, 
and if my supine posture is re-enforced with a clam fritter sup- 
per, I am rich in revelation. I may be wrong, but when I go 
to a nightmare for prophecy, 1 shall consult a corpse on im- 
mortality. Literally we know considerable, relatively nothing. 
Mr. Flammarion is an astronomer of note, and his repudiating 

exact science for dreams is little to his credit. 

* * * 

In striking contrast to the fulminations of the Reverend Peter 
C. Yorke, who, in Milwaukee the other day, was delivered of an 
interview in which he praised Schmitz to the skies and attacked 
every one and everything that is opposed to him, Reverend 

Joseph Gleason of Tomales, who has been East collecting m j 

to rebuild his church, which was totally destroyed by the earth- 
quake, in a sermon said: 

"The car strike in San Francisco is a startling example of 
false leadership, as it was brought about when there was no rea- 
son that it ever should have taken place; and now, through its 
rank failure, it is bound to bring poverty and discredit to a set of 
hard-working men who, through lack of judgment, placed their 
affairs in the hands of those blind to their best interests. Finn 
the very earliest times there have been dangers arising from 

false I lership, the domini if deceivers and smooth hypocrites 

who fallen upon the credulity and honesty of their EellOW mi Q. 
And who has to suffer for all this? Not, certainly, the false 
prophets themselves, but the poor, honest fellows who put blind 
trust in their counsels and then have to suffer the conse- 
quences." 

The contrasl between the two reverend gentlemen ; 

ing to need an] comment. Which proves himself' the truer fl 

ol' labor- -the man who preaches anarchy or the man who 

preaches peace? Which comes the nearer tic .horn both 

profess to serve? 

• • • 

Kene-aw Mountain Landis, the United State- District Judge 
wdio compelled John IV Rockefeller to "conn only 

ty-one years old. lie was bom at Millvilie, Ohio, Novem 
80, 1866, and was the son of an army surgeon who - 
through the Civil War. He is essentially a - nan. hav 

ing been a newsboy when seven years oi age. He was a news- 
paper reporter later in life, then learned stenography and became 
a courl reporter, meanwhile studying law. When v. 

-ham became Secretary of State under President Cleveland, 
lie chose l.andis as his secretary. In this position. Landis m 
remarkable record, showing wisdom and penetration that re- 
sulted in Gresham tins' ing him fully in everything. Landis 
incurred Cleveland's enmity, and the President demanded that 

sham dismiss him. This Gresham refused to do. L 
and Cleveland became better acquainted subsequently, and a 

n them, i 
offered him a high diplomatic post, but l.andis declined it, pre- 
ferring i and study law. Subsequent events have 
shown the wisdom of this move. He steadily advanced in his 

ifession, and was appointed United S -triet Judge for 



the Northern District of Illinois in 1905. It is seldom that so 
young a man attains this high Federal position. 

When Judge Landis issued a subpoena directing Rockefeller 
lo come into court and tell all he knows about Standard Oil af- 
fairs, John Miller, the oil magnate's attorney, protested strongly. 
"He is an old man. He is quite wealthy," said Miller. "He has 
i great many financial holdings, and it will be a hardship and 
difficult for him to come here." 

That was where Miller made a mistake. "The court makes no 
distinction as far as its processes go between a poor man and a 
wealthy one," said Judge Landis coldly and slowly. So John D. 
had to come. But even a man of Judge Landis's ability couldn't 
squeeze information out of foxy old John. 

'* * * 

The National Guard has won respect and admiration by its 
work at the Presidio during the past week. It has been highly 
praised by both officers and men of the regular army, who have 
been interested spectators of the maneuvres and the sham warfare 
that has made the Presidio look like a real battleground. The 
success of this season of mimic warfare may have the effect of 
bolstering up the spirit of the National Guard and leading to its 
reorganization. During the year, the membership has largely 
fallen off, many companies being dismissed on account of failing 
to come up to requirements. It was claimed on one hand that the 
men did not drill, as is required of them : that the militia has the 
active opposition of the labor unions ; that they had no proper 
accoutrements on account of lack of money. It is to be hoped 
that the martial exhibition of the past two weeks will arouse the 
proper spirit and lead to good results. 



Murine Eye Remedy is a Favorite Toilet Accessory. Re- 
stores Natural Brilliancy to Tired and Faded Eyes. 



The Little Palace Hotel is now the center of attraction 

when luncheon and dinner is to be discussed. 



11.50 Books for 50c. 

We have just received several hundred differ- 
ent titles of late copyright fiction ordinarily sold 
at from $1.08 to $1.50. We have placed them 
on sale during the month of July at 50c each. 

Among the titles are: 

THE GREEN FLAG. Conai. Doyle 
STRANGE SECRETS, Con.n Doyle 
TRAFFIC. Thurston 

CRIMSON CRYPTOGRAM. Tr.cy 

MTSTERIOl S MR. SABIN. Oppenhelm 

CAPTAIN JACKMAN.CI.rk Ruuell 

WARD OF THE KING, Macq.oid 

HOCSE WITH THE GREEN SHI TTERS. Green 

NBW i.KIR STREET. Gl..lnfl 

BLAKE'S BOOK STORE 
646 Van Ness Ave. Near Turk Street 




^ lUTTfD'S MAWA//A. V 
TARO FLOCK 

A /' 

/or thf Infant or Admit 

On poind ol Taro Flour contains mort 
nutrition than ten of wheat (lour. 

As a tissue builder it has no equal. 

If you have dyspepsia and indigestion 
live on TARO FLOUR. It is Nature's 
most substantial food. 
GOLDBERG BOWEN &CO. 

iton 1 Oakland 

CALIKORNH 



GOODYEAR RUBBER COMPANY 

P.. H PEASE. President 

Hare Relumed to Their OW Ho»e. Where D»T Were Locled Before the Fire 

573-579 Market. Street., near Second 

TeL Te»ptrirj 1781 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 20, 1907. 




Some one should write a book on "Week-End Etiquette." Tor 
that is the most popular form of entertaining just now. And 
judging from the complaints of many a hostess, serious breeches 
of etiquette are frequently committed by visitors at country 
homes. It seems incredible that a well brought up girl should 
accept hospitality from a friend and fail to write a gracious note 
of thanks, yet an acquaintance of mine, who recently entertained 
a house party of six girls and an equal number of men, tells me 
that all the men and only two of the girls acknowledged her 
kindness. 

People who have emancipated themselves from all formalities 
may consistently disregard usage and tradition, but among peo- 
ple who lead formal lives and enjoy society in the accepted defini- 
tion of the word, unconventional disregard becomes mere rude- 
ness. The reason so many girls are nor invited around more is, 
that they seem to feel they are working their passage by enter- 
taining the men without a "thank you" of any sort to the 
hostess. I have seen girls positively rude to the women mem- 
bers of the household they are visiting, and when thej wonder 
that their second and third seasons find them high and dry in 
town, while other girls are visiting at lake and seashore. 

A clever young society matron said to me the other day: 
"Girls should remember that house-party invitations are always 
parsed feminine gender. The men may admire a certain girl, 
but it is in woman's jurisdiction to rule whether or no she shall 
be invited into the home. The girl who flirts outrageously with 
hubby is not apt to get another invitation to visit, nor is the 
girl who tries to annex sister's suitor." The law of "thine and 
mine" not only applies to animate beings, but to inanimate 
things. The habit of borrowing and forgetting to return is the 
rock upon which many a girl's popularity as a house guest has 
split. I know of a girl who visited friends in Burlingame last 
summer, but history does not record her presence there this 
season. The reason therefor is that she must have accumulated 
a suit-ease full of things, ranging from a gold-backed clothes 
brush to a box of shoe polish, all of which she borrowed and for- 
got to return. Her hostess, instead of jogging the girl's memory, 
has simply dropped her from her list. 

One of the items that makes for unpopularity in a house 
guest is an inconsiderate demand upon the servants. The ser- 
vant problem looms particularly large in the country, and the 
guest who causes dissension below stairs is not wanted. The 
girl is not politic who prejudices a maid by asking undue service' 
of her. Marie frequently gives notice that she will leave if 
Miss So-and-So ever comes again, and madame usually chooses 
Marie of the two evils. 

There are people who have a talent for being a guest, juul 

as there are °. n with a talenl Eor the duties of hostess. LTsu- 

ally the person who can satisfactorily lill either one of these 
roles can slip into the other without a misfit. The perfeel 
hostess knows what makes an ideal guest, and the training of 
guestship stands in good stead when one musl aci the hostess. 
The society women who are ever welcome house guests are in- 
variably delightful hostesses themselves. And the girls who are 
now most sought after will no doubt make the best hostesses 
when they are called upon to preside over a home. Fortunately 
the qualities that make for these roles may be developed, and it 
is a pity that they are not more assiduously cultivated. 

One of tlie most popular guests in the younger set is Virginia 
Jolliffe, who is in constant demand at country homes. Shje 
spends a great deal of her time with Jennie Crocker at Uplands, 
and is frequently Mrs. Walter Martin's guest at Burlingame. 
Miss May Keeney is another popular visitor. She has recently 
been the guest of Mrs. Fred McNear, and is frequently with Mrs. 
C'arolan at "The Crossways." The Hyde-Smith girls are in 
great demand — Margaret is with the Irwins in Honolulu, and 
Gertrude has recently been visiting Helen Dean in San Rafael. 

The production of Oscar Wilde's "Lady Windermere's Fan" at 
the Redwood City Opera House is awaited with the greatest in- 
terest by society. The loading role will be played by Mrs. Fred 
McNear, who has undertaken the difficult part of Lady Winder- 



mere's mother — a woman with a past who achieves a creditable 
future. A metallic quality of worldliness illuminated by a single 
acl of self-sacrifice must be given to the part, and those who have 
heard Mrs. McNear rehearse are amazed at the subtle way in 
which she handles the part. Mrs. Worthington Ames. Mrs. Spen- 
cer, Mrs. Willard Drown, Mary Keeney, Allan Dunn, Fred Mc- 
Near ami several other prominent society chaps are in the cast. 
As it is a drawing room play, the women will all wear stunning 
gowns. There is no other diversion on the social horizon that is 
exciting as much interest as this play — the most pretentious 
piece of acting ever attempted by smart set Thespians. 

Del Monde's Sot ial Swim. 

W. A. Stevens. Mrs. Stevens and family motored from Oak- 
land to Del Monte in a Knox ear, and will spend several weeks 
,,t this delightful resort, They are accompanied by Mary and 
Helen Corbet, Grace Towne and Bancroft Towne, of Colorado, 

William Watts Kerr, of San Francisco, motored to Del Monte 
recently in a Haines car. 

Mis. A. II. Payson, of San Mateo, toured to Del Monte last 
week in her auto car. 

Mr. and Mrs. E. D. Silent, of Los Angeles, are on a motoring 
trip to Northern California. They registered at Del Monte on 
their way north. 

C. F. A. Talbot, Miss Talbot and party, of New York, ar- 
rived at Del Monte last week in an automobile. 

A large automobile party came into Del Monte on Saturday 

in three motor cars. The party was made up of It. 1'. Sehwerin, 
general manager of the Pacific Mail S. S. Co.; Mrs. B. P. 
Sehwerin, of San Mateo; J. J. Moore and Mrs. Moore of Red- 
wood City; -Commander Lopez, IT. S. N. : Mr. Halsted. U. S. N. ; 
Captain and Mrs. Barneson. U. S. \. Mr. Sehwerin's car is a 
Winton; Mr. Moore drives a Locomobile, and Captain Barneson 
operates a Peerless. 

Califoraians in New York: John N. Pomeroy, G. L. Belcher, 
I' 1 . W. G. Lyons. William L. Mallabar. M. Newman. Has id V. 
Walker, Walter J. Bartnett, F. H. Gibson, Robert A. Roos, San 
PranciSCO; Milton S. Hamilton, Oakland: Charles S. Neal, 
Thco. W. Rosseter, Alameda; William F. Ford, Ontario; C. Van 
Zwalenburg, M. I>.. Riverside; H. C. Gray, M. L. Byce, Lyman 
C. Byce Petaluma; Mary E. Hyde, Palo Alto; F. II. Gibson, 
Los Angeles; Olive Veilex. Pasadena. 

Californians in New York: J. E. Krafft, wife and family. 
Tennis A. Bergen, Miss L. Mattheas, James 1). Phelan, Fred 
J. Koster, Mrs. A. J. Barkley, Miss A. Lederer, 0. 0. Poket, 
San Francisco; Dr. W. F. Snow, Stanford University: B. F. 
\lan-lieU. Pasadena; Charles H. Victor, Oakland; C. W. Flem- 
ing, Los Angeles. 



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DAUCHY & CO.'S NEWSPAPER CATALOGUE. 

The fin; edition of this well known work has been issued as 
usual, and contains all the distinctive features which have made 
the sixteen previous editions valuable. This book is a complete 
newspaper directory, listing a u the periodical publications of the 
United States and Canada. Editors, publishers, advertisers 
and all interested will find in it a great deal of information most 
compactly arranged. The published price is $5, and i\ can be 
obtained from the publishers, Messrs. Dauehv & Company, 9 
Murray street, New r York, or from booksellers. 



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HAMBURG- AMERICAN LINE 



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Sao Francisco, Gal. 



July 20, 1907. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



1 



15 



©If* (§lb fttkon (gambling fylfa 

Slllffi. $. E. Aminltli 



No more is the dance hall and the gambling house a part of 
life in Alaska and Yukon ! Official edicts issued from Ottawa 
and Washington have abolished what were once the principal 
amusement places of the seeker after wealth in the Northland. 

An era that began in the days of '49, that has filled the pages 
of literature with its doings, the life that Bret Harte immortal- 
ized in the "Outcasts of Poker Flat," and other tales, came to an 
end unwept, unhonored and unsung a few weeks ago. 

It was pure coincidence that both the American and Canadian 
Governments should almost on the same day issue orders that 
dance halls, gambling, drinking in boxes, and various other evil, 
but hitherto considered necessary elements of frontier life, must 
forthwith be abolished. From the issuance of that order, the 
ideal of the law-enforcers on both sides of the one hundred and 
forty-first meridian has been to make the north as safe, as sane, 
as quiet and as moral as Ottawa or Washington. 

No longer may Kipling sing, "Never a law of God or man 
runs north of the fifty-three." For at the present time, not only 
frontier law, but the law of the quiet Bast, is enforced as far as 
the Arctic circle, and in some places far north of the circle. 

The passing of the dance halls and gambling houses in Alaska 
and Yukon marks another step in the polishing oft' of the North- 
land. The people of the North in late years have been quietly 
advancing along all lines, and the prevailing ignorance as re- 
gards the countries will receive a shock of enlightenment in the 
near future. 

Although it will be the aim of the Alaska-Yukon Exposition in 
1908 to give the people an idea of what the two territories have 
lo offer in the way of homesteads, agricultural, commercial and 
industrial opportunities, early life in the Northland will not be 
neglected, and one of the most interesting displays will be the re- 
production of frontier life as it used to be. Since the dance hall 
and gambling house have become things of the past, il has been 
planned to give the public an idea of just what frontier life « is 
like. On the Pay Streak, the amusement thoroughfare of the 
Exposition, enterprising Northerners will build rcplieas of some 
of the famous old dance and gambling halls over whose counters 
millions in gold dust have passed, and between whose log rafter, 
five score mighty fortunes have been frittered away. 

The days of the picturesque gambler who staked fortunes on 
a single card, of the dance hall girls whom the miners nightly 
pelted with nuggets of gold as they sang their turns, did not end 
with the civilizing of California. For when Klondike was dis- 
covered, and half a million people started on a wild rush north- 
ward, foremost in the weary climbers of the Chilkoot, first to 
build at Log-Tallin City, leaders in the crossing of Linderman. 
and not the last to brave the terrors of Whitehorae rapids, were 
these gamblers and these women who worn north to prey on the 
gold winners. 

In those days, when thousands were flung about as 

as two bit pieces to-day, nothing was too insignificant to escape 

betting upon, no sum was too great to risk. <»ne man lo 

hundred thousand dollars in a couple of months; others were 
content to 9 ten thousand dollars nightly. Profes 

men in Dawson > 9e from three to four or five 

thousand dollars nightly at the card tables. Seldom was li - 
a hundred dollars staked. 

Much of this money went to the dance hall women. It is 
the fashion to decry these women and to assume that they are all 
bad beyond redemption. But that is far from the truth. Many 
of the women in the dance halls, who danced nightly with the 
miners and who shared their drinks, were as innocent of wrong- 
doing as the most carefully protected convent girl of Faris or 
.Yew York. Indeed, in the early days before the mothers, wives 
and sisters of the miners arrived in the country, many ci these 
women married well. Many who to-day are taking their place 
of society in hundreds of towns throughout the 
D known as the wife of the rich miner. Mr. 
Blank — first met their husbands on the floor of a Dawson dance- 
hall and charged them live dollars for the privilege of dancing 
half a doten rounds to the aph. 

" \ dot eoun best of them." said .lack London in 



Dawson. "Look there at Lucille, with the face of an angel and 
i he tongue of a gutter devil; at Mollie, who looks like one of 
Gainsborough's old-English beauties stepped from her frame to 
revel out the century in a Dawson dance hall — and Eva, what 
a mother that girl would make." 

This is the life that the recent law has forbidden — gambling. 
Open gambling has long since been prohibited on the Canadian 
side, but it has continued in secret. On the American side it 
has been open till this recent order. But for the past four years 
both these have lost the interest and the sensational features of 
the early days. 

Many men to-day, bent and broken in fortune, look back to 
those early days with a bitter feeling, with the wonder so com- 
mon to all humanity, "How could I have been such a fool?" 
For there were hundreds of men who had worked hard all their 
lives, who went north with the rush, and in a few days picked 
up a fortune of nearly a million, and in a few months later 
were without a dollar. The story of one, to-day a care-taker in 
a big Seattle sky-scraper, will tell the tale of many. 

This man was about forty when the discovery was made. He 
sold a couple of houses his father had left him, and got together 
a sum of three thousand dollars. He reached Dawson among the 
first, staked on upper Eldorado, and inside of a couple of months 
knew himself wealthy beyond the dream of avarice. 

For a few months he worked faithfully, and then it was neces- 
sary to visit Dawson. The second night in Dawson he needed 
some tobacco, and left the cabin in which he was staying to get 
it. Passing a gambling hall, he strayed in to see the fun. 

There was in this man's blood, although he had never gambled 
before in his forty years of life, a strain that came from some 
long-dead ancestor. Throwing a small poke of dust on the 
table, more in fun than anything else, he played for small sums 
at first. But inside half an hour he was dead to all the noise 
and color about him, to all but the whirr of the dial that meant 
a small fortune won or lost at each revolution. He sent for his 
bank book, for the deed to his claim, and when the long rays of 
the autumn sun strayed over the dome late next afternoon, he 
was stripped of claim, wealth, everything, except the clothes 
in which he stood. .Never again opportunity knocked at his 
door, and to-day, instead of driving in his own automobile and 
seeing his children educated at the best colleges of the country, 
he slaves twelve hours a day, his children are apprentices to 
different trades, and he himself d man at th 

of fifty. 

The wild and wooly element in the li frontier has 

at last been vanquished by the ever-sp 

Even as Polly, the Duchess, .lack IlamMin. Jack Osbourne, 
Yuba Bill and Tennessee's Pardner disappeared in 
sixties, as well as all the other whole-souled, genial, witty peo- 
ple that pertain to the beginning of a mining camp, so in Yukon 
and Alaska the old-time gamle women who had live 

pounds of gold dust thrown at them sometimes in a single night 
as a reward lor singing a couple of home songs to men long 
separated from home, have scattered and fled. The fortunes 
they made came easily and went as easily. Few pictures of 
earth have as much of garish color ol inging life, 

and finally of hidden, hopeless p lie lives of the under- 

in the great gold rush that was the most picturesque fea- 
ture of the last decade of the nineteenth century. The life has 
I away, and all that remair- ami there a few gar- 

rulous old men who relate to all who have time to hear how they 
once "could sign my cheque for a million, sir." in the lays when 
Dawson hummed with the ie appearance of the 

frontier life, such as the uni s - n would have it. 



FREDS B. VOLZ MRS. HELEN FREESE 

Volz $ Freese 
IMPORTERS OF WORKS OF ART 

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16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 20, 190T. 




'Har&Gxr'Mtollrdtyltrt.ltoi'l' 
'Qae (b*L*ill pUj lie dmUir. v&jniL 



Bad as conditions have been in the regular refugee camps, 

they seem to be far worse in the unattached camps, which consist 
of collections of vagrant, irresponsible people who, ever since the 
tire, have led a haphazard existence, housing themselves in tem- 
porary shacks. That they are not incapable of earning money is 
evidenced by the fact that they have had no trouble in procuring 
plenty of liquor, turning the camps into hotbeds of vice and 
drunkenness. Sanitary conditions in these camps are terrible. 
Worse than anything else is the influence that the children are 
subjected to, being reared in the midst of debauchery. The 
Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children has called _ 
attention to this evil. The number of children subjected to this 
evil manner of living is nearly three hundred. The society 
mentioned has called the attention of the city authorities to the 
matter, and recommends that some action should be taken. 

Ihere should be no delay. The people who make up these 
camps should be compelled to lead decent and orderly lives, and 
to house themselves after the manner of civilized beings. The 
lire gave them an excuse to degenerate into beastliness, and the;, 
will not change except under compulsion. Probably most of them 
are beyond reform, but among three hundred children, even of 
such parents, a large percentage can be made, under decent condi- 
tions, law-abiding and useful citizens. 

-Just why the taxpayers of San Francisco should be forced 



to spend their money to help the street car strikers, who admit- 
tedly are in the wrong and never were in the right, no fellow 
can find out, and yet, according to the daily papers, Sheriff 
O'Xeil has hired a 'bus to take the jurors in the Class case to 
and from their hotel at an expense of twenty dollars a day, be- 
cause, being a union sympathizer, he could not allow his charges 
to ride upon the cars. In other words, here is an expense of some 
seventeen dollars a day added to the expenses of the trial because 
of the "sympathies"'" of the sheriff. Any one can see where this 
sympathy dodge would reach, if allowed to go untrammeled. 
it is true, of course, that the objects of O'Neil's sympathy are 
not, as a rule, among those who pay the taxes, and who, conse- 
quently, bear the expenses of his sympathy, and that may account 
for the recklessness with which he throws away money that is 
not his, but it is to be hoped that when the bills for the trial 
come to be settled that CNeil will be forced to pay for his sym- 
pathy out of his own pocket, 

If the 'Iveitmoes, Furuseths, Zants, Corneliuses and other 

foreigners who are incessantly stirring up strife and preaching 
treason and anarchy, do not like the United States or San Fran- 
cisco, why the deuce do they not pack up their things and clear 
out? This is a good country, the best in the world to live in, 
save for the annoyance of having a lot of unwashed aliens com- 
ing here, and in broken English, urging the rabble to break the 
laws, defy authority, and make mischief generally. Law-abiding 
foreigners, who will become Americanized and become good citi- 
zens, are always welcomed to this country, but we do not want 
the anarchists and fanatics, the scum which has no patriotism 
whatever. Let them either stay at home or go off somewhere, 
say in Africa or the Pacific Islands, and start a nation of their 
own along their own impossible lines. They are not wanted here. 

Never did a labor leader hang on to his job with more 

tenacity than is displayed by Cornelius. Beaten at every turn, 
discredited, proven to have led the carmen into an ill-advised 
strike, he still hangs on, still bluffs his deluded followers into 
believing that they can win the strike — and, most important of all 
to Cornelius, still draws his $-tb'5 a month. The general public 
is aware that the car strike is ended, that the union has ceased to 
exist. But the carmen, through listening to their blatant leaders, 
have been fooled into thinking that they still have a chance to 
win. When they come to a realization of the true state of affairs, 
Cornelius will be deposed. He, too, will be out of a job. The 
high wage that his demagogy earns him will cease. . Then the 
members of the union should sue him for having obtained monev 
under false pretense. 



The Court of Appeals is to be asked to release the man 

Walsh, who was arrested in Sausalito by District Attorney Boyd 
of Marin County for playing the races, and the hearing is to 
come up next month. Meantime, the District Attorney proposes 
to continue to make arrests, and he will probably in a few days 
add several women to his list of those taken into custody. There 
are nearly a hundred women who hang around the pool rooms 
disgracing their sex and themselves, and there is no reason why 
a severe example should not be made of them. The fact that 
they are women is all the more reason why they should be driven 
away and made to go home and attend to their duties there, 
even if so drastic a measure as an arrest is necessary to drive 
them from the pool rooms. The fact that they have no business 
in pool rooms is so well recognized that even the desire to make 
an extra dirty dollar does not prevail with the owners of the 
dives, and the wearers of skirts are forced to sit outside on the 
benches and make their bets through the men who accompany 
them. The criminal gamblers object to dealing with women who 
squander savings. 

The testimony is all in in the murder trial at Boise. It 

is remarkable how even the witnesses for the defense, the very 
men who are on trial, corroborated the testimony of Orchard, 
'lhey all admitted knowing him. They admitted that he was at 
the places at the times he said, and that he was with them ; they 
admitted that they sent him money when he says they did, and 
they admit that they proposed to defend him in the courts until 
he turned Stale's evidence. The only thing they deny, and that 
any criminal, of course, will deny, is that they contemplated the 
wholesale murders that he committed, he says, at their instiga- 
tion, or that the money was given hi in by them in payment of 
his crimes. In fact, the very sentiments of treason published 
in their papers have their hearty endorsement. The revelations 
of this trial and its treatment at the hands of unionism should 
warn the country of the danger that it is allowing to grow in its 
midst. 

If it is possible to learn anything by experience, the case 

of Sam Parker in .New York, who, although convicted of extor- 
tion, of even calling strikes that he personally might profit by 
tliem, was chosen as President of the Building Trades to which 
he belonged. A more recent case has been furnished by the 
Western Federation of Miners, who re-elected the men on trial at 
Boise, and some who are in hiding, to the offices they formerly 
held, regardless of their record of crime. If a crime has been 
committed in the name of unionism, if the victim belongs to 
either the business or professional classes, then unionism will 
defend the offender, regardless of whether he is a cold-blooded 
murderer or only a blackmailer and thief. It shows a low state 
of morality; in fact, it shows no morality at all, but to such a 
low condition has unionism brought the labor of the country, 
with the assistance of yellow journalism. 

A great many persons, and some of our journalistic 

brethren among the number, seem to labor under the delusion 
that Schmitz'fi candidacy for the Mayoralty is a joke, and that 
he does not stand the remotest chance of election. The same men 
have had the same idea now with great regularity for the past 
llnee municipal elections, and the result of their hallucinations 
ought to be evident even to themselves. If Schmitz ran to-day 
he would get a much larger vote than a great many persons 
fancy he would receive. He certainly would receive a majority 
of the labor union vote, as any man can ascertain who is inter- 
ested in the matter, by asking the first member of a union who 
comes along. The man himself may not be in sympathy with 
the idea of re-electing Schmitz, but he will tell you that it is the 
subject of much discussion in all union meetings, and that at 
present it is the purpose to renominate him. 

Those union men who deluded themselves for years into 

the belief that they were the whole works in San Francisco, are 
looking pretty sour these days when the crowds on the street can 
— boycotted by the unions — constitute perpetual object lessons, 
showing that there are just a few people in this city who do not 
belong to or sympathize with unions. Wlhen the cars go by 
jammed with passengers, and neat, intelligent looking ones at 
that, it fairly sickens the plodding unionists and the victims of 
the bone-wracking bump-wagons. To the unionists this object 
lesson, if they have intelligence enough to appreciate it, teaches 
that union domination is on the wane in this city, and that the 
alien agitators are nearing the end of their tyranny. 



July 20, 1907. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



X7 



A (&$&b Snsuratu? §>if0ttnng 



The special edition of the Pacific Underwriter, giving the pre- 
mium receipts of the various companies for San Francisco busi- 
ness Eor the sis months ending June 30th for the years nineteen 
handled and live, six and seven, lead to the conclusion that the 
companies which paid their losses in a satisfactory manner, a fin 
the recenl disaster, made a record which is now gelling them 
business, tt also indicates that the companies which acted in 
such a manner as to render their actions open to criticism have 
not been forgotten. 

The total premiums for the period named in nineteen hundred 
and five amounted to one million six hundred and six thousand 
dollars in the following year. For a like six months they re- 
mained practically at the same figures. For the first six months 
of this year the premiums total two million eight hundred and 
ninety-one thousand six hundred and thirty-six dollars, an in- 
crease of over a million and a quarter. This is accounted for by 
the present high rates, and shows that the faith of the insurers 
is still unshaken in the solvency and ability of the companies to 
pay their claims. In considering the amount of monev paid by 
this city to the insurance companies for premiums during the 
time mentioned, there must be added to the total given the pre- 
miums paid to the unlicensed companies, and the various Lloyds 
and Mutuals the records of which are unobtainable. Most con- 
servative estimates place this sum in excess of a half million, 
and by many this is thought to be too low. In the opinion of the 
writer, three and a half million would not be far from the cor- 
rect total figures. This represents the amount paid for the in- 
surance effected; what it would have reached had the insured 
been able to obtain all the insurance needed, cannot be estimated. 
The same rate of premium would have been obtained, and as- 
suming that the congested districts are not insured to exceed 
fifty per cent of the values, the result would have been staggering 
in the volume of premium' receipts. This represents all the 
insurance obtainable in anything that at all savors of an ability 
to pay a claim. The companies quoted in the Pacific Under- 



writers' Tables are all full, according to their line sheets, but 
the line sheets here are, as a rule, cut to twenty-five per cent of 
the average line. 

The leaders are the Home of New York, with a premium in- 
come of over three hundred and eleven thousand dollars, and 
Liverpool and London and Globe follows with two hundred and 
sixty thousand and odd dollars. The Northern with one hundred 
and forty-seven thousand, and the Royal with one hundred and 
forty-four thousand dollars. The first company on the tables 
referred to is the Aachen & Munich. Its business has gradually 
decreased from twenty-seven thousand dollars in 1905 to eigh- 
teen thousand in the following period, and to a little over twelve 
thousand dollars in the first half of this year. The British and 
the New Zealand Companies and the local companies seem to 
have had a most auspicious half year. The California wrote 
sixty-three thousand three hundred and thirty-three dollars in 
premiums the first six months of this year, as against estimated 
premiums of ten thousand dollars for the same time of last year. 
The old Fireman's Fund carried off fifty-seven thousand one 
hundred and seventy-four dollars this year, against a little over 
twenty-five thousand dollars for the first half of the year preced- 
ing. These figures should be acceptable to the Eastern stock- 
holders and should lead the companies generally to a little more 
liberal view of the situation and 8 corresponding increase in the 
amounts they will carry. It is a good time to get business on the 
books, and when it is on it is likely to stick. The rates at pres- 
ent in force cannot be advanced; the next move will be a re- 
duction, and the scramble Eor business and the letting down of 
the bars will come then. II is heller to get business now at the 
present high tariff and keep it than to enter into a light later. 
The insurance is badly needed, and the company that has the 
most accommodating policy will not be forgotten in the future, 
any more than is forgotten the companies who paid dollar Eor 
dollar. 

THE SPECIAL AGENT. 




Southern Pacific 



Ticket, Office, Flood Building 
San Francisco 




VACATION TIME HERE 

WHERE WILL YOU SPEND IT? HOW 

WHAT WttX IT COST? 

Questions often asked 
OUR SUGGESTIONS: - 

Shasta 'and Mountain Resorts. Klamath and 
Crater Lakes. Lake Tahoe. Yosemite. Kings 
and Kern Canyons. Santa Cruz and Mountain 
Resorts. Boulder. Wrights. Laurel. Mt. 
Hermon. Glenwood. Capitola. Del Monte. 
Monterey. Pacific Grove. Paso Robles Hot 
Springs. El Pizmo. 

Hunting, Fishing. Boating. Bathing. Mountain 
Climbing, Cottage. Tent, Camp Life. Excellent, 
Hotel Accommodations. Low summer vacation 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 20, 1907. 




INANCIAL 




The Gas Company 

Spreading Out. 



The latest assessment announced is 
one of $10 per share on the entire 
stock, common and preferred, of the 
Pacific Gas and Electric Company, 
levied July 15th. As there arc :!00,000 shares of the stock, of 
which 100.000 shares are preferred, the sum to be raised is 
$3,000,000. This the directors though^ was better than to attempt 
to market any more securities, owing to the prevailing financial 
conditions. The money raised in this way will be applied to the 
obliteration of the large indebtedness incurred in rehabilitating 
the local system, which was so badly damaged in the fire of April, 
1906, and in keeping up with the demands for improvements in 
the interior which are constantly increasing. The company, be- 
sides being the provider for local requirements in the way of 
light and power, is also the holding corporation for the old Cali- 
fornia Gas and Electric Company, which controls some eighteen 
subsidiary concerns throughout the interior, which have also In 
be financed. The capital stock of the Pacific Gas and Electric 
Company is $30,000,000, and the bonded indebtedness is $9,520,- 
000. 



Local Securities in 

1 > i:\IAND. 



The market for local stocks and 
bonds has done better of late, and it 
is hoped that from now on the situa- 
tion will improve. Prices in nearly 
all lines of investments have now reached a point where they can, 
under normal conditions, be regarded as bargains, and this natu- 
rally offers an attraction for buyers. When the general situation 
clears up locally, as it is bound to do before long, there is still 
room for a marked improvement, which is .bound to take place. 
This is the season of the year when the packers and canners begin 
to loom up, and the shares of local institutions of the kind are 
already beginning to spruce up. Alaska Packers has shown con- 
siderable activity during the past week, with sales as high as 43. 
A weak tone in the Associated Oil shares is puzzling people, the 
price dropping at one time as low as 28, with light reaction to 29. 
The latest sales reported for Spring Valley were at 20%. 



The tone of the Comstock market is 
S u \.qe Mini: healthier, and prices have had a 

Lookixg Well. firmer tendency. The stocks in best 

demand are those known as the mid- 
dle mines. There has been quite a better showing in Savage of 
late, on the Sutro Tunnel level, and on the strength of this, work 
will again be resumed in the same section of both the Chollar and 
Potosi mines. According to the latest reports, a southeast drift 
in Sivage is now being advanced along a quartz zone twenty feet 
in width, and it is believed that this is the same belt where ore 
carrying high values was encountered during the early eighties, 
and that it is also the northern extension of the Hale & Norcross 
me body. This drift is 79 feet in from the main line of the 
tunnel, and the outlook is considered good for the development of 
an important ore body. Considerable work is also being done in 
the vicinity of the Ward Shaft, which is now down a total depth 
of 2,522 feet below its collar. 



A Mining Shakpeb 

at Work. 



The general land office in Wash- 
ington is after an individual named 
"Frank King," now supposed to be 
doing business in this city, who, it 
is charged, makes a business of filing fraudulent claims on what 
are said to lie valuable coal lands in Alaska, and selling them to 
unscrupulous persons. His method, it is said, is to execute the 
location notice in the name of some mythical person in whose 
name an assignment of right is executed when a purchaser is 
found. After filing his claim he places an indorsement on it 
to the effect that the location has been filed in the United States 
land olfice at Juneau, Alaska, as required by law. The indorse- 
ment of the land officer has, it is said, been found to be a forgery, 
and the alleged location notice has never been filed in the land 



office. Purchasers of the claims offered for sale by King are said 
to have found that they do not conform to the law requiring 
coal lands filed to be opened and improved and the place to be 
marked by permanent monuments. He has, it is charged, vic- 
timized a number of persons in Juneau and also in Portland. 



A Late Date to 
Find Error. 



After being in existence for a period 
of over five years, the charge is made 
that the desert map of Inyo County, 
published by the mining bureau, is 
full of errors and fatally misleading, and that as a result of using 
it as a guide, prospecting parties have suffered intensely, and 
that in some eases persons have perished. This is denied in toto 
by Male Mineralogist Auhury, who claims that the map is a 
reproduction of the official map of the county carefully compiled 
by a United States Deputy Surveyor, from IJnited States public 
and private surveys, and that it is correct. This map was re- 
produced in 1902 by the Stale Mining Bureau as an accommoda- 
tion for the public at a cheap rate, as the price asked for the 
county map — as high as $5 and sometimes $10 — was practically 
prohibitive. It is considered strange that during the entire five 
years that this reproduction of the original map has been in 
existence, this is the first time its authenticity has been ques- 
tioned. 



After suffering for years under the 
LTm'ol'Ular State Tax. imposition, there seems to be a dis- 
position to rebel against the extor- 
tionate corporation tax. This tax is believed to be unconstitu- 
tional, and one which will not stand the test of law, and an effort 
is to be made to wipe it off the Statute books. Not alone are ac- 
tive corporations forced to pay this tax, but those which have 
lain idle for years. If they fail to meet the demand, they are 
summarily annulled, forcing them, before they can resume op- 
erations again, to go through the whole process of incorporation. 
The State might have reaped a pecuniary harvest from the rea- 
sonable fees for incorporation during the past few years had 
it not been for the outrageous amount demanded for the neces- 
sary papers, and the heavy restrictions placed on companies by 
the State. The result has been to drive all business of the kind 
to other States and territories. The excuse given, that cheap 
fees and special privileges opened up an opportunity of which 
"wild-catters" were not slow to take advantage, is absurd. Wild- 
cat companies will flourish all the same. If they find the cost 
of operation too high in one State, they can readily find another 
to cater to their requirements, so that the action of California 
with this end iu view is simply mulcting her own treasury to no 
effect. 



A prominent British Columbia con- 
Col. Sutherland's Bio temporary devotes considerable space 
Northern Mine. to the operations of Colonel W. J. 

Sutherland, who has made such a 
success out of the Alaska-Perseverance mining property, located 
near Juneau in the Silver Bow Basin District, Alaska. The com- 
pany, of which Colonel Sutherland is president, has, it is said, 
already spent about a million and a quarter dollars in develop- 
ing the Alaska-Perseverance, which is opened by a tunnel 1x8 
ii the clear, and 3,540 feet long, with an upraise from this tun- 
nel to the Gilbert workings near the surface. This upraise, said 
to be the greatest in the world, is 8x16 feet, and 910 feet on the 
perpendicular. The company, which is now erecting the first 
section of its large mill, has already planned out more improve- 
ments, which will cost in the neighborhood of another million 
and a half, which has already been provided for, including more 
tunneling and a power plant where an electric force will be 
generated to operate the entire mine and works. The power will 
be generated from two large rivers, which, when harnessed, will 
yield upwards of 40,000 horsepower per day when the water is at 
its lowest point. The surplus power will be sold to various 
mines along the mute of transmission, which in itself will bring 
the company in a good profit. The average value of the com- 
pany's ore will be about $5 per ton, out of which it is hoped to 
clear a profit of over $3 per ton. The many friends of Colonel 
Sutherland in this city will he pleased to hear that he is again 
on the high road to fortune, and will wish him every success in 
his new undertaking, which from all accounts is one of more than 
ordinary magnitude. 



July 20, 1907. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



19 



New Nevada Share 
Marki c. 



Ever since the Boards have opened 
after the holiday recess, the market 
has been quite active, with consid- 
erable gains shown in the prices of 
iders in the Goldfield list. As usual, when the market for 
these shares beM-ins i,i shew some staying powers, the bear clique 
starts ns work of under-mining by sytematic raids, based on false 
rumors which flood the street. However, people are getting used 
now tu these tactics, and give no credence to reports unless those 
which emanate from official sources. The news from the mines 
of a reliable character has been especially favorable of late, and 
the payment of a dividend, No. 1, amounting to $90,000, by the 
Little Florence Mining Company, has had quite a steadying ef- 
fect upon this section of the market. The balance of these shares 
show little change. The announcement was made during the 
week that the San Francisco Stock and Exchange Board, out of 
consideration, it is said, for the Nevada brokers, had decided to 
return to the old rate of commissions, which is one-half of one 
per cent on all transactions, with a minimum of $1. The news 
has been received here that ground is now being staked out for 
the first mill to be erected in Manhattan, and that the machin- 
ery has been ordered. It is expected that the first ten stamps of 
the plant will be dropping by September loth next. 



One American mining company has just scored a success on 
the London market which is a pleasing matter of record. With 
the payment of the last interim dividend of 25 cents per share 
recently declared by the directors of the Camp Bird mine, the 
whole of the issued capital of $4,100,000 was returned to the 
shareholders. The company was registered in Great Britain in 
September, 1900, but did not enter into possession of the prop- 
erty until May, 1902. 



Ex-State Senator Ralston received his commission as Sub- 
Treasurer from the Secretary of the Treasury at Washington 
during the week, and is now preparing to file his bond of $350,- 
000 required by law. It is expected that he will commence the 
duties of his office on August 1st. 



Mr. John W. Twiggs, the well-known mining official, is visiting 
the Sa\age ami oilier Conistock properties in which he is inter- 
ested, lie will return to the city toward the end of the month. 



An assessment of $•"> per share has just been levied by the direc- 
tors of the Ocean Shore Railway Company. 



UNPATRIOTIC PEN PUSHERS. 

The managing and city editors of San Francisco daily papers 
seem to exult, exceedingly whenever they can trump up 
story derogatory to the army and navy officers, who. aoi 
advertisers, nor numerous enough to affeel the subscription lists 
perceptibly, may be attacked with impunity, mon 
since tlie\ are powerless to answer back. Of course, if as 
commits some serious offense or makes a grave blander, he should 
be criticised, but he should be equally praised for his good quali- 
ties or praiseworthy nets. This hitter the San Francisco daily 
press never does. It plays up i adillo of an an 

navy officer r\ ice generally, endeavors to 

d, and Loves to assail everything military. This cowardly, 
unpatriotic and almost incomprehensible attitude may easily be 
explained, however, It is due almost wholly to jealousy and 
envy. The managing editors of the San Francisco dad] 
so imin inferior in cultivation, character, good manners 

itatus to the average army and navy officer that they 
cannol - help feeling their inferiority, and like all dis- 

appointed climbers, they resort to all sorts of petty spitework. 
Thev are envious, that's all. 



An old-time educator says that "Orchard shows greater 

brain activity and alertness than that possessed by many uni- 
versity students." Include university p 
without contradiction. 



An Eastern publication asks for "good, truth;'; 

stories." Th none out this way. but a fev 

hens' teeth and t] San Fran ^ehmir, no i 



OBITUARY. 

Captain Taylor, the father of Mrs. George A. Pope, Mrs. Geo. 
A. Newhall, Augustus and W. H. Taylor, Jr., died in this city 
on the I'.'th of .Inly. Captain Taylor was a man of wonderful 
information, a gentleman of the old school, and beloved of all 
who knew him. tie was a native of Philadelphia, and he died 
at the good old age of eighty-three years. 

* * * 

Robert Watt, one of the most capable and popular pioneer 
business men of California, died suddenly on Tuesday evening 
at his home, 2016 California street. Heart disease was the cause 
of death, although an injury which he sustained in a collision 
between his carriage and a Sutter street car last February is 
believed to have undermined his health and hastened the end. 

Watt was born in Scotland 75 years ago, and came to Califor- 
nia in 1851. He settled in Nevada County and engaged in 
mining, laying the foundation of his large fortune. After fol- 
lowing this occupation for many years, he came to San Francisco, 
where for the last quarter of a century he had taken an active 
interest in business affairs. 

He was actively engaged in business up to the time he was 
fatally stricken. He was president of the wholesale drug firm 
of Langley & Michaels, vice-president and director of the Union 
Trust Company, vice-president and director of the San Fran- 
cisco Savings Union, and a director of the Wells-Fargo-Nevada 
National Bank and the San Francisco Gas and Electric Com- 
pany and the Marin County Water Works. He owned much 
valuable property throughout the city and State, and leaves a 
great fortune. 



Mr. Hiram Johnson, assistant to District Attorney Boyd, 

at Sausalito, is reported as having evolved a method that will, 
in a legal way, forever stop the practice of gambling in the beau- 
tiful trans-bay city. Attorney Johnson is one of the bright 
legal minds of San Francisco, and is already entitled to the 
praise and thanks of all the citizens of Marin for the effective 
aid he has given District Attorney Boyd. 

The Spaulding Carpet Cleaning Works .it 925 Golden 

Gate avenue is rapidly gaining a splendid reputation for prompt- 
ness mid thoroughness in work. The housewife wiil appreciate 

the cleanliness, ability and energy tie I in carryia 

orders. 



Captain Wainwright. who is appointed to command the 

new battleship I ho picked up an 

old yacht at Santiagi I ' ■ ' plights into and out of 

a Spanish cruiser. Admiral Sakomo note. 



SECURITY SAVINGS BANK 

316 MONTGOMERY STREET 
San Francisco, Cat. 

Authorized Capital $1,000,000.00 



Paid Up Capital 

Surplus and Undivided Profits 



500,000.00 
305.000.00 



Interest at 
the rate of 



4 



per cent 
per annum 



was paid on deposits for six months ending June 29, 1907. 

DIRECTORS: WM. BABCOCK. S. L. ABBOTT. O. D- 
BALDWIN, JOSEPH D.GRANT, E. J. McCUTCHEN. L. F. 
MONTEAGLE, R. H. PEASE, WARREN D.CLARK, JAS. L. 
FLOOD, J. A. DONOHOE. JOHN PARROTT, JACOB STERN- 



Zadig 8 Co. 

Stock Brokers 



Tonopah, Goldfield, Bullfrog. 
Manhattan, Comstoclc, Fair- 
view and Wonder Stocks 



324 Bath Street, directly opposite the Be* San Francisr* Stock 
and Exchange Building. We have installed a private wire ton. 
nactioQ San Francisco with Goldfield. Phone Temporary 1723. 



20 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 20, 1907. 




Mr. A. F. Hancock, the Secretary of the Austin, of Texas, who 
lias recently been on the Coast, and who superintended the set- 
tlements of the company after the disaster, it is reported, intends 
to resign the position he now occupies. He has entered into a 
partnership with Mr. William Q. Whilden, of New York. Mr. 
Whilden was formerly with the Eagle Fire, a company not un- 
known for its methods here after the fire. The firm of Whilden 
& Hancock will have several Eastern Stales for the Walla- 
Walla of Washington, and the Austin of Texas, and will be 
managers of the Eastern Departments of the two companies. 

* * * 

The actions of the new president of the Mutual Reserve arc 
being noted with a great deal of interest. Mr. Archibald C. 
Haynes has the ability, ami ranks well among insurance men, 
and it is trusted that he may be able to place the Reserve among 
the companies which receive credit for solvency and are given 
respect, a position which the Mutual Reserve has not occupied 
for many years. His first move of any moment was a good, 
healthy cut in salaries, and a dismissal of a lot of office dead- 
wood. The late president received $1:59,000, the late first vice- 
president $31,000, and the late second vice-president and coun- 
sel $'.'5,000 per annum. The new salary list is: President 
Haynes, $20,000; Vice-President Harper, $10,000; Counsel 
Tyng, $10,000 per annum. The medical director's salary has 
been increased from $T,500 to $9,000, and the secretary's from 

$3,900 to $1,500. 

* * * 

The American Fire of Philadelphia, which won such unen- 
viable notoriety here by the robbing methods it pursued in the 
settlements of its claims, is reported to have settled all its claims 
— with the exception of about seventeen thousand dollars, four- 
teen thousand of which was re-insurance in companies which 
went into the hands of receivers. The assessment of sixty-two 
per cent of its capital stock, which was levied on its stock- 
holders, is due the 15th of this month, and it is thought that 
the bulk of it will be paid. An examination of the company, 
made by the insurance department of its own State, as of the 
date of April 30th of this year, showed its total assets as being 
four hundred and sixty-seven thousand three hundred and thirty- 
eight dollars. Its liabilities were seven hundred and seventy-six 
thousand and fifty-five dollars, leaving impairment of three hun- 
dred and eight thousand, seven hundred and seventeen dollars. 
The probabilities are that the company will resume business, but 

not on this coast. 

* * * 

The estate of Charles 11. Cheyney, of Philadelphia, is suing 
the Equitable Insurance Association on a very old policy, held 
by the deceased. The suit is in the Common Pleas Court, and 
is a suit in equity, brought to try and compel the company to 
distribute what is calculated to be the amount of the surplus 
of the company due under the contract. 

* * * 

Mr. Henry Carsten, President of the Washington Fire, and 
.Mr. W. S. Wurman, have organized and incorporated the i li- 
stens & Earles Co. The object of the company is to manage 

a general fire insurance agency. 

* * * 

As an illustration of how the mutual system of insurance 
works, the recent decision of the Appleton, Wisconsin, courts 
may be referred to. Some time ago, about a hundred policy- 
holders of the Mutual Reserve Live Stock Association, combined 
and refused to pay an assessment; as a result of the suit, the 
company went into the hands of a receiver. The case was lost, 
and the policy-holders were compelled to pay the assessment. 
Now the receiver has made another assessment, and in all prob- 
ability a third one will have to be met. The total liabilities of 
the company totaled two thousand four hundred dollars; the 
assessment brought two thousand ; the second assessment was 
ordered by the court to make up the deficiency. The last as- 
ii lent will have to be made to meet the expenses of the re- 
ceiver, and to pay the legal expenses of collecting all three. This 



is not by any means an exceptional case, as regards the ultimate 

outcome of this class of companies. 

* * * 

The local agents of Denver recently gave an elaborate ban- 
quet in honor of E. E. Rittenhouse, the new insurance commis- 
sioner of Colorado. Mr. P. B. Gaylord, a local agent, presided 
as master of ceremonies. A discussion of the new insurance 

laws of Colorado took up the time after tbe banquet. 

* * * 

The incorporation of the American Birth Insurance Company 
in Boston, some time ago, will be recalled by recent happenings 
in the courts of that city. The intention of the company was 
to furnish a cash payment to all mothers who were members of 
the company at the time when the stork had delivered the pack- 
age. It was managed by the gentler sex, and it died before it 
was fairly born. The receiver, in winding up its affairs, makes 
charges of gross and criminal mismanagement, and misappro- 
priation of funds. The funds, it appears, were used by the offi- 
cers to float another corporation of kindred character, named 
the Parents" Educational Association. It is too bad that the 
ladies could not make the scheme go. They were most directly 
interested. The chance to induce model Boston to frown on race 
suicide by offering a premium for all births is lost forever, and 
Boston still remains in the doubtful column. 

» * « 

Tin' report of the immediate retirement of William B. Joyce, 
of i lie National Surety Company, is again given space in the 

Eastern insurance press. 

* * * 

In the Haywood trial at Bois City, Orchard admitted in his 
testimony that he had burned a cheese factoi-y in Canada, at a 
place near a village called Brighton, and collected six hundred 
dollars insurance. 

* * * 

A correspondent in the "Surveyor," a New York insurance 
journal, has' the following to say regarding brokers and broker- 
age association : "But in the case of brokers, the idea is more 
reasonable and striking, because properly the brokers are the 
employees of the assured. The Credit Men's Association virtu- 
ally criticises the licensing of brokers, either by the State or by 
insurance companies, on the ground that the result is not satis- 
factory in determining the qualification of the person thus 



Sho&S fitted 




SHOES FI11ED WITH O'SULLIVAN'S ' HEELS OF NEW 

RUBBER MAKE LIFE OF MEN AND WOMEN WORTH LIVING 

Be calm and quid; the clatter and clink ol hard leather heels and null are 
no longer tolerable. 

O'Sullivan Keel, are made of brand new rubber. Thai', why they give 
the elastic, bounding; comfortable, ipringy step of youth; that's why they 
outwear leather heels and all other rubber heels. 

If your dealer hain't O'Sullivan's. send 35c. and diagram of your heel to 
the ma Iters. 
O'SULLIVAN RUBBER CO.. Lowell. Maas. 



!■ 



July 20, 1907. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



21 



licensed, and such licenses do not. carry any guarantee of know- 
ledge of the business, and are more or Less deceptive because of 
that fact." 

At this time, this squib will serve to set some of the local men 
of this city wondering what weight the deposit of the hundred 
dollars required by the local association of brokers will carry in 
the minds of the public. It is to be hoped that the license issued 
by the local authorities will mean mine than the one spoken of, 

and issued by the New York Exchange. 

* * * 

Mr. W. L. Hathaway, general agent for the Mutual Life In- 
surance Company, of New York, has returned from a month's 
vacation spent at Del Monte with his wife and family. Mr. 
Hathaway's vacation was an enforced one, his physicians order- 
ing a long rest to give nature a chance to build up after debili- 
tation caused by over-work. 

The Atlas Insurance Company of England, after a battle in 
the courts extending over some years, has finally won a verdict 
over the Atlas Insurance Company of Des Moines, by which the 

latter is compelled to cease using the name "Atlas." 

* * a 

The Merchants' Insurance Company of New Jersey is to be 
resurrected. The company has been before the courts for seven 
years in process of liquidation. The stock has all found its way 
into one man's hands, and the company is to be re-capitalized 
and a surplus created and commence business as soon as possi- 
ble. The company was organized in 1851, and for a number of 
years transacted a profitable business until 1890. Mr. W. P. 

Goodwin is to be the President and the capital is all local. 

* * * 

The Imperial Eire of Denver has re-insured the Colorado 
business of the Austin of Texas, and the latter company with- 
draws from the State. 

* * * 

Charles W. Hill, than whom there is no more popular or abler 
special agent, who represents the McNear and Wayman Agency, 
is to be removed to the mountain field, with his headquarters in 
Denver. He will leave a large number of friends behind him. 
but will make an equal number of new ones in his new field. 

* * * 

The Supreme Court of Wisconsin held in the ease of Laun vs. 
Pacific Mutual Life Insurance Company of California, thai o 
life policy issued pursuant to an agreement to give the insured a 
rebate on the premiums payable thereon was valid notwithstand- 
ing the Wisconsin stature of 1898 prohibiting a life insurance 
company from offering as an inducement to insurance any re- 
bate of premium and authorizing a revocation of the license is- 
mii'iI to any company violating the statute, and that the insured 
could not recover the premium paid. 



18 READING AN EFFORT? 
We can make it a pleasure for you. Hirsch & Kaiser, opticians. 
1757 Fillmore street, San Francisco. 



Fireman's Fund 

INSURANCE COMPANY OF 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Capital $1,600,000 Assets, $5,772,374.28 

Sansome and California Sts., S. F. 

The most stupid of all the utterances of the publicity 

bureau of the Standard Oil Company are those emanating from 
Chancellor Day, of Syracuse University. That pedagogue 
hands the "vested interests" a very sour lemon every time he 
speaks or writes in their favor. 

Connecticut Fire Insurance Go. 

Of Hartford. Established 1850. 

(Japltal Jl. 000.000.00 

Total Assets ' 6.401.698.31 

Surplus to Policy-holders 1,922.305.24 

December 31, 1906. 

518 California St., San Francisco, Gal. 

Benjamin J. Smith, Manager 



STRIKERS' NOVEL EXCUSE. 

A new excuse for striking has been found by Ihe miners . 1 1 
Mazuma. Nevada. Thev are satisfied with the hours they have 
to work and the wages paid them, but they will not submit to 
changing clothes and undergoing a search at the end of the 
Work. The rule that they should be searched was made b 
the mine-owners have lost over .$100,000 through thefts of high- 
grade ore wlii.h the miners carried out in their pockets. The 
mine owners of Goldfield had similar trouble, and had to endure 
it for a long time, it being a rule of the miners' union that if 
any member was discharged for stealing, all work would cease. 
The lessees of the mines concluded that a strike would be more 
expensive than the stealing that was going on, BO submitted to 
the robhorv. The Mazuma employers, however, have decided to 
fight it out. Of course, organized labor will characterize the 
rule as to the men being searched an infringement of persona! 
righte, an attempt to fvrannize over the poor workingman. 
Honest people, however, will applaud the action of the mine 
owners, and wish them success in protecting themselves from 
such ha re- faced robbery as went on at Goldfield. 



Cash Capital, ?200,000. 



Cash Assets, $546,555.61 



Pacific Coast Gasualty Go. 

of California. 

Employers' Liability, General Liability, Teams, Elevators, Workmen's 
Collective, Vessels, Burglary, Plate Glass Insurance. 

Officers — Edmund F. Green, President; John C. Coleman, Vice-Presi- 
dent; F. A. Zane, Secretary; Ant. Borel & Co., Treasurers; F. P. Deerlng, 
Counsel. 

Directors — A. Borel, H. E. Bothin, Edward L. Brayton, John C. Cole- 
man, F. P. Deerlng, E. F. Green, I. W. Hellman, Jr., George A. Pope. 
Henry Rosenfeld. Adolph A. Son. William S. Tevls. 

Head Office — Monadnock Building, San Francisco. Marshal A. Frank 
Company, General Agents for California, Kohl Building, San Francisco. 

Founded A. D. 1792. 

Insurance Go. of North America 

Philadelphia, Penn. 

Paid-up Capital »3.000.00» 

Surplus to Policyholders 4.042,994.41 

San Francisco Conllajrratlon Losses paid 3.260,000.4 

BAILEY & JOHNSTON. General Agents, 

N.E. Corner Pine and Battery streets, San Francisco 

British and Foreign Marine Insurance Co., Ltd 

Of Liverpool. 

Capital $6,700,000 

BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO., Agents. 
418 Jackson Street. San Francisco. 



Continental Building and Loan Association 

Market and Church Street*. San Francisco, Gal. 

In Business for 18 Years 

CAPITAL SUBSCRIBED - - - $15,000,000.00 

CAPITAL PAID IN AND RESERVE - - 3,481,317.50 

4 per cent, paid on ordinary deposit* 6 per cent paid on term depowti. Inlereal paid o" de- 
poaiu ainee orsanizaooo o*er S2. 500.000.00. Call or wile al any bine. Always elad to 
answer queaoont. 

Washington Dodr*. PT*ft<l*ni Joaaph 0. Crawf -,td. M D . Xnd TIn rr»*i4«nt 

Jama* McCnlloch. tat Tic* Praaidant Gavin Str5.tr Attorn*? 

William Cor bin. See'* and Oan'l Nanag-ar 



Baume Betulae. the greatest relief for Rheumatism. Neuralgia, Sciat- 



PAGIFIG TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY 



Capital $500,000 



F. G. Drum, President 



Murry F. Vandall, Manager 



TITLES EXAMINED AND INSURED 



420 Montgomery Street 

San Francisco - - California 



J 



22 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 20, 1907. 




VOfOEILE 



j~± 



The automobile event of the week has been the outing given 

to the orphans last Monday. The event was a success from start 

to finish, and the automobile Dealers' Association of California, 

and especially N. R. Cooper, who fathered the scheme in the 

city, are to bi congratulated. There were no accidents, and the 

little ones had sueh a good time that even the most phlegmatic 

had to stop and admire. This is a very popular movement all 

over the country at the present time, and it was surprising that 

more of the owners did not come to the support of lie- dealers 

and loan their ears. If it had not been for the enthusiasm of 

the members of the committee in charge, there would have been 

some of the little ones who would have had to stay at home. But 

we have had our orphans' day. and next year, when the tots are 

invited for another ride, there surely will be automobiles enough 

to go round. 

* * * 

The Dealers' Association should nol stop the good work. There 
are some who have never enjoyed the pleasures of a ride in an 
automobile, and if something like the last event is not started 
for their benefit, they will go to their graves without the know- 
iedge <>l' what it means to be carried through space in a modem 
vehicle. Unlike the little children, thej have not the world be- 
fore them, but it is all the past; they are the old people. Hie 
dealers should give an outing to the venerables who are quietly 
waiting the call of the reaper for the last journey to another 
life, wdiere all hopes are placed for a sweeter existence. There 
are several homes in the city where those who have run their 
races in the upbuilding of the city and State are now spending 
their last days. To the committee that so successfully took care 
of the little ones is now made the appeal for those who we must 



With such a rush ha? the automobile taken its position in the 
business and pleasure life of the city in the last fifteen months 
that one can hardly sit down quietly and figure out the future 
of the game. Within the last six months every event that has 
been held has, in success, so far gone pasi expectations that it 
has been like sending a snowball down hill. The La Honda en- 
durance run, the hill climb at San Jose, th.> meei at Del M 

and the orphans' day far surpassed all the wildest, hopes of lie 
promoters. But things are at sixes and Bevens. There has 
no concentrated action to better the condition of the automo- 
bilist. First and foremost, the owners of automobiles who havjj 
taken part in these events should have been banded for good 
roads. The Automobile Club of California should have had a 
representative at all these events, gathering in members to the 
club. Instead of having a membership of a little over five hun- 
dred, there should be over live thousand. The club is the most 
prominent figure in the automobile world of the State when legis- 
lation and good roads arc considered. Ai the preseai time the 
work and money for these two movements are supplied by a few. 
They do it willingly and with enthusiasm, but the owners ol' 
automobiles owe it to themselves to change these conditions. 
Why should an owner of an automobile stand by and allow a 
Few enthusiasts to do all the work and spend all the money to 
get results that they, the owners, enjoy, ft is not justice, and it 
is not American. Now let that sink into your soul, you who 
enjov automobiling as it i* not enjoyed in any other part of the 
world. Show r your appreciation, show it so that it will count. 
You who are not members of the club, get in and boost and 
strengthen the right aim of the club by putting in an applica- 
liou for membership. Read the handwriting on the wall. They 
are now trying to stop automobilists using certain roads up in 
Napa County. The Club is fighting the ordinance. If the ordi- 
nance stands the test of law, it will mean that the Supervisors 
of every county in the State will be passing laws that will mean 
that you will not be able to leave the city in a motor-car. Sup- 
posing the men at the head of the club tire of the work and let 
the club go to the "bow-wows." Where will the automobile 
owner be? It is impossible at the present time to raise a fund 
that will get the results that the officers of the club are getting 



WITHOUT A PEER AT THE PRICE 




APPRECIATION AND ENTHUSIASM 

grows greater every day as the season advances, for this 
new Cadillac, the hist and only car at its price, proving a 
formidable rival oi cars s.aiing at from 50 to 100 per cent, 
higher. The price of the Model G is made possible only 
by Hi. unsurpassed facilities and equipment of the largest 

factory in lite world devoted exclusively 

to the production of high-grade 
motor ems. Its guarantee 
is the Name. 




of speed. Sprightly enough In 
design to satisfy the whims of the young 
folk's • with the trood form that commends it to fashionable 
family use. Ring type engine governor; smooth, quiet run- 
ning sliding gear transmission; shaft drive direct on high 
speed; lightness in weight secures utmost tire economy. 
I., t your nearest dealer give you a demonstration. 

Described in Catalog GAE 

Model H— 30 h. p., 4 Cylinder Touring Car, Catalog H A E 
Model M — 10 h. p., 4 Passenger Car, Catalog MAE 
Model K — 10 h. p., Runabout, Catalog MAE 
Send for catalog of car that interests you. 

CADILLAC MOTOR CAR COMPANY, Detroit., Mich. 

Member A. L. A. M. 

For sale by Cuyler Lee, 359 Golden Gate avenue. San 
Francisco, and Lee Motor Car Co., 1032 South Main St., 
Los Angeles. 



through their personal influence. If such a fund was to be raised 
it would mean that every owner would have to dig down in bis 
pocket and produce tens of times more than what it costs to be 
a member of the elub. This is not said in the interest of the 
club, but from a selfish motive. What we arc getting through 
the endeavors of the officers of the club is a big interest on the 
investment, and we do not want to see the "ante" raised. - We 
can use the money for pleasures that must be curtailed it the 
club should become inactive in its quiet work. The trouble has 
been, because the officers do not come out with three-sheel post- 
ers telling of those who they have downed in their light Eor 
justice, the average motorist thinks that the club is laying dor- 
mant. But good results are always accomplished in a quiet way. 
So it is with the elub. Now let every automobile in I he city and 
the Siate bear the badge of the club. Applications for mei 

ship may be sent to this office. 

• * • 

While the automobile club and the owners should get together 

Eor '"iter results, there is another channel thai has lost its course. 
It is the Dealers' Association. The Association started out like 
a two-year-old when the automobile show was started last fall. 
There was a big attendance at the meetings, and considerable en- 
thusiasm displayed. After the show became a matter of histoi ) . 
the attendance at the meeting became lighter. Members have 
been coming to the meetings, and just listening to what a few 
have had to Bay. Most of those who have attended ihc meetings 
have afterwards said that there was nothing doing. Right here 
is where the trouble lies. Most of the members of the I !i 
Association sit around waiting for others to do something, in- 
stead of getting in with some scheme of their own to help the 



MOLINE ROADSTERS 

At the Crescent Garage, corner of o^McAllister and Gough 
streets one may buy a Moline Rooadster, 4-cylinder, 20 horse- 
power for $1950 f. o. b. Immediate delivery. 



July 20, 1907. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



23 



game along. Then is needed more action all along the line. 
The demand for automobiles In the city is Lessening, and il lb 
hut a matter of time before there will i" 1 a hustling for trade. II 
will not be so much thai all those who can afford automobiles 
have been supplied, but that the enthusiasts who have the funds 
have bough! cars. Wha1 is needed is runs and events of all kinds 

to make new devotees to the game. Many a present owner never 

thought of owning an automobile before he went on a run where 

he was a guesi of an owner. He went on the run, saw that the 

automobile was more perfect than he supposed, and came home 

with the determination of being in the game. The Dealecs' 

Association has programmed a ran up and in Lake County, and 

down to Pizmo Beach. These two events should take place, as 

well .is more runs by the automobile club. Numbers are needed 

in the automobile gatne. 

* * * 

The merry automobilist spins along the Marin roads, mak- 
ing a round trip via San Rafael from Tiburon to Sausalito, fol- 
lowing the loop of the Northwestern Pacific Railroad, and tak- 
ing in the many beautiful and picturesque spots en route. The 
Hotel Rafael is the rendezvous for luncheon and dinner parties, 
and the casino is a delightful rest spot after an hour or two 
cramped up in a car. The fashion and chivalry of San Fran- 
cisco are at the Rafael this year, and Manager Orpin is pleasing 
everybody by bis splendid managerial ability. 




LEGITIMATELY HIGH PRICED 

DEMONSTRATION BY APPOINTMENT 

LOZIER AUTO AGENCY, 

132 Valencia St.. San Francisco 



.). M. Kruse, his son-in 



* * 
law, W. 



S. Gilmorc, and their wives. 



have just returned from a tour to Livermore in their new White. 
Mr. Kruse has been an automobile enthusiast for some time, but 
says he never enjoyed the sport to the fullest extent until a 
couple of months ago. Since then they have gone on trips of one 
or more day's duration almost every week, and have yet to ex- 
perience trouble of any sort. Not even a puncture has so far 
fallen to their lot. With Ccilmore at the wheel, the party covered 
over a hundred miles on the day's journey. They usually start 
out with no special programme, and tour until dusk. From this 




cHve^ 




" e C7ie {Best ylutomobile" 




city they went to Walnut Creek, and from there through Liver- 
more to the Tesla Coal Mines. Then back by way of Dublin to 
Haywards. Gilmore says the roads are hard and solid, but 
somewhat bumpy. They found one stretch of ten miles out of 

Livermore that was line, and had a chance to "let 'er out." 

* * * 

M. J. Laymance, Mrs. Laymance and 

■"■"■"""^X the Misses Laymance. Mr. Speare, M rs. 
L. Adams and Miss Fore, all of Oakland, 
and H. B. Rector, manager of the retail 
automobile department of the White Sew- 
ing Machine Company, made a trip to 
Lakeport recently in two White steamers. 
They made their headquarters at High- 
lands, and toured on short trips from 
there. 

* * * . 

C. A. Hawkins. Western 
of the Wb _ Machine Company, 

left recently for led business trip 

Fast". Hawkins expects to he away a 
month. Before going to Chicago he will 
visit Portland, Butte. Spokane and Min- 
neapolis. Hawkins will also spend 
time at the factory looking over the new 
White models. 



Price $4500 FOB OereJand. 5 Passenger 

The Steam, flexibility of motor it the greatest of any car. Besides being a most powerful car, the Steami u one of the meat 
durable machine! built. 

STEARNS cant are designed by engineers, built by mechanic, tested by experts and consequently operated with satisfaction 
by their users. We invite your careful investigate* and companion, confident that we will profit thereby. 

THESE ARE FACTS THAT WE WANT TO DEMONSTRATE TO YOC 

Phase Franklin J0O8 

California-Nevada Automobile Company, 368 Golden Gate Avenue 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Miss M. Fhrdall is now the proud pos- 
of a model A Oldsmohile. which she 
purchase. I a week a| 

and the day af- 
ter purchasing her car. she dr< 
•lose and return. So delighted wi- 
with its performance that she has planned 
to t-tur to I B and other Southern 

points of inter 

* * * 

William the - 3, ruler of 

mam. to have a race track 

own. As plani 
magnitude that will cause the Long Island 

• • • 
land, Ohio, w! 

number of antomobi! 

:s appropriation for 
maintenance to I The fignr. - 

year were $2,854. 



24 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Jdlv 20, 1907. 



Queer ideas are sometimes entertained 
by officers of the law. This was shown 
bv the act of a motor bicycle eop in a 
town not a thousand miles from Now 
York recently. He was now to the jot, 
having been placed on his machine, a 
brand new one. only a few weeks ago, to 
run down motorists who did not strictly 
observe the speed laws. That these laws 
applied to him, however, never seems to 
have entered his mind. Having engaged 
in a controversy with the owner of an- 
other motor bicycle, in which each made 
great claims for the speed of his machine, 
the cop made up his mind to settle the 
matter. So he arranged to have both 
himself and his rival cover a stretch of 
road on his beat at top speed. They were 
lined up, sent off together and timed. 
The cop came off victorious, which per- 
haps was lucky for his opponent. He 
might have been arrested for illegal speed- 



The City Assessor of Cleveland is very 
much puzzled over the great slump in au- 
tomobile values that has occurred in that 
prosperous burgh. Looking over the re- 
turns of automobile owners of that city 
for taxation purposes, he finds that the 
cars are valued all the way from $75 to 
$900. The latter is the highest priced car 
on the list, and the majority of them 
hover around the $100 price. He wants 
to know if makers are cutting prices. 

It is easy to see now that the Automo- 
bile Club of America made a great mis- 
take when it limited its recent sealed 
mechanism contest to four days. Running 
under seal is evidently a very alluring 
task, for about 42 of the 41 cars that 
made perfect scores in the contest are still 
running in some way or another with their 
seals unbroken; at least one would judge 
so from the reports. 

* * * 

During tin 1 month of May the Ameri- 
can exportation of automobiles and parts 
continued its vigorous ascent. The total 
appraised value of exported cars, of which 
there wvre "281, was $618,018, which, to- 
gether with $47,432 worth of parts, 
brought up the month's total to $665,450. 
This represents a net gain of $180,009 for 
the month over the returns for the same 
month one year ago. and shows an appre- 
ciation of 37 per cent. Similarly, the 
$4,770,18': total for the eleven months 
ending May 31st, which represents the 
value of 3,567 ears, and components to the 
value of $548,871, reveals a gain over the 
corresponding period of last year amount- 
in- to $1,813,439, and a similar gain of 
$2,603,443 over the return- of the first 
ten months of the fiscal year of 190.". 
This gain differently expressed, amounts 
to (11 per cent in one year, and 120 per 
cent in two years, the uniformity of the 
growth thus being clearly apparent. 




MACKAY CURE 
for ALCOHOLISM 



Surest, safest and shortest treatment. Taken at home, 
no publicity; no detention from business; no hypodermic 
syringe; no morphine. Government Contracts just re- 
newed for the fourth time. The only Treatment ever 
adopted by any Government. Strongly recommended by 
Tim Grace, the Archbishop of Quebec, and scores of scien- 
tific and philanthropic authorities. Sanitarium for special 

C&ses. Correspondence strictly confidential 

and In plain sealed envelopes. 

THE M»CKAY TREATMENT CO. 

Write Department 7 , 61 Maiden Lane. New York. 



BUICK 

2 CYLINDER CARS 

made a sensational showing at the Santa Rosa races, winning 
six out if eight events. All against cars gf double the price and 
power gf the Buick. 

Cars in stock for immediate delivery". 

4-Cylinder Touring Cars $2050.00 

2- " " " 1400.00 

2- " Runabout* 1250.00 

HOWARD AUTO CO., 

PHONE FRANKLIN 2034 404-406 GOLDEN GATE AVE - 



IRVIN SILVERBERG 



CHAS. S. MITCHELL 



THE IRVIN MACHINE WORKS 

Best Automobile Repair Shop West of Chicago 
General Machine Work and Gear Catting 

Our automobile repair department Is equipped with the finest up-to-date 
machinery. The unusual size and consequent steady work enableB uo to 
employ specialists instead of expecting our mechanics to be Jack-of-all 
trades. Moreover, we can furnish in advance to owners exact estimates 
on cost of any repairs they may contemplate. 

Phone Market 2366. 335-337 Golden Gate Ave. San Francisco 



^tf Urielk Runabout 



4 CYLINDER 
16-18 HORSEPOWER 
90-INCH WHEELBASE 
30x3 1-2 INCH TIRES. 



PRICE $1150 

OSEN & HUNTER AUTO COMPANY 



407 Golden Gate Avenue. 



Phone Market 2723. 



USE MAYERLE'S EYEWATER 




before exposing your eyes to strong wind. <lu*t. light or snn. It i« a perfectly harmlnst and rffec- 
live pwtWfttlQn. (liinrnntwl un<l«r llic U. S. DniRi Act. June 30t1i. "08, Serial Rd NWS Mr 
Chas. Crow, cure of W. W. Montague & Co., Pipe Shop, says: "1 Hn»c boon troubled with my eyes 
for a number of yean. 1 tried a bottle of your Eyewnter and find it i* the bmt Kyewalor I ever 
used, and would not be without it in the house." Highly rectwi in ended for woak eyu, poor 
eight, eora eyes, cloudiness of vision, floating spots, pain about the eyes, behind the head" or In 
templet, watery or discharging ryes, feeling like sand in the eyes, burning, smart! i< .-. It a(n| 
scratching, twitching gluey eyes, heavy eyelids and other eye troublei Permit hfttlrg their ton- 
sitivo eyes exposed to the strong light, dust, wind or sun can get instant relief by a tins Mnyerle's 
fcyowater. BEWARE OK INJURIOUS IMITATIONS Take no substitute. Price ■'.. I., ,,mil. i. 
I or one doxtn tattles, $f> 00. Mayerle's Antiseptic Eyeglatl « ipers, to boused when gUtMl blur, 
tire or strain the eyet, 2 for !U>C. No glutM ItATt George Mnyerln's <>i>i u-il [aft I lute unleii »b- 
■■■liii.lv corroct. Address all communications to George Mnycrlo, 114'.' Golden U.-it. ft venue, Sau 
Francisco, near Webster. Phone West 3768. Cut this out. 



July 20, 1907. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



25 



The State ran boast of many youthful operators, but there ara 
few lade under sixteen who tandle big touring cars as skillfully 
as .1. Mills Boffj son of John D. Hotf, presidenl of the Pacific 

Coal, ('lav & Oil Company, of this city, who ranks with the 
youngest of the motorists. He is only fourteen years of age, 
vet runs his father's big White steamer with tile art of a pro- 
fessional chauffeur. He understands the mechanism of the car 
thoroughly, takes care of it himself, and the machine has not 
u'i Been the inside of the shop. Almost every week business re- 
quires Mr. Hoif to visit the company's coal mine at Priest's 
Valley, a distance of 165 miles, via Hollister. On all these 
trips Mills Hoff is at the wheel, and "dad" takes things easy in 
the tonneau. Last week the youngster drove down from Oakland 
to San Jose in one hour and thirty-five minutes, and made the 
run to Gilroy in two hours and twenty-eight minutes. 

White steamers have been selected by the Punjab Transpor- 
tation Company of Asia, after severe competitive tests, in which 
the leading makes of the world took part. Low cost of up-keep, 
supreme reliability and suitability for continuous bus service 
in a mountainous country, where there are practically no repair 
facilities, were the factors which determined the choice. Ten 

Whites have just been placed in service by this company. 

* * * 

The present trend in automobile construction is toward the 
simplification of the entire mechanism, doing away with this or 
that feature that may not be absolutely essential. One thing 
aimed at in the construction of Columbia gasoline and electric 
cars is simplicity. The electrics, for instance, are the simplest 
cars of their type ever put upon the market, and no extensive 
knowledge of mechanics is necessary to operate them. The gaso- 
line cars contain no more parts than are absolutely necessary, 
and every part is made to do the full amount of work. 

Even those motorists who are most vigorous in their denun- 
ciations of those who disobey speed regulations can scarcely fail 
to enjoy the escape a Buffalo driver bad recently in Pennsyl- 
vania. The instance came when E. C. Richard, who, with Geo. 
M. Davis, completed a trip around the (Hidden tour route in a 
Thomas Speedway Flyer, crossed the bridge over the Susque- 
hanna river at Columbia, Pa. A sign warns drivers not to ex- 
ceed ten miles an hour over this bridge, which is a mile long. 
Richard accordingly sent the Thomas along at a very leisurely 
pace, anil was surprised when he reached the iiibei side to see 
I be gate dropped in front of him. 

"Young man, you are under arrest for 8] ding across this 

bridge," said a deputy sheriff, stepping up to the side of the car. 

Richard saw that lie was in for it, even if be had uol gone 
above twelve miles an hour. He explained that it would do no 
good to arrest him, as he had no money. 

"I have only about a dollar and can't even borrow- a penny 
until I get to Philadelphia," he said. "But go ahead and find 

some place for me to store the ear and a.bnlel where 1 r.in stay, 
and I'll send to the factory for some." 

"How long will it take?" the deputy asked. 

"A week at least," Richard assured him. 

This was something entirely unexpected. The deputy and 

the bridge tender went into immediate conclave. Result — They 
found il would cost more to keep Richard ami the car than the 
line would amount to. and a few minutes later he was on ' 

to Philadelphia onmulcted. 



LUNCH AND DINNER 
at the Little Palace Hotel, at Post and Leavenworth, are meals 
that are worth while. AH the care of a splendid chef, and the 
service of the old house, combined with an exquisite menu. 



RAINIER 



35 h. p. Make and Break with Simms-Bosch Magneto. 

The Pullman of Motor Cars 

Guaranteed tree of repairs for one year. 

HAYES &. DAM. 

428 Golden Gate Avenue. San Franclaco 



Old Poodle Dog Restaurant 

824-826 Eddy St., near Van Ness Ave. Formerly at Bush St., 
cor. Grant Avenue. Phone Franklin 63. 



1 907 PREMIER 



The Q»ulily 
Car 

Touring Gar and Touring 

Runabout, 52400. 24-28 H. 

P, 4-cyIinder water cooled 
selective type, sliding gear 
transmission. 

E. P. S10SS0N, Agent 
Northern California 

GOLDEN GATE GARAGE 
Fell and Ashbury Streets San Francisco Phone West 6885 




GEO. P. MOORE CO., Inc. 

AUTOMOBILE SPECIALTIES 



Headquarters for Imported Novelties, Domestic Necessities and 
Local Courtesy combined with Fair Dealing. 



Branch — 1005 South Main St., Los Angeles. 
Branch— 231-233 Twelfth St., Oakland. 



721 Golden Gate Avenue, San Francisco 



SECOND HAND 
Automobiles 



BOUGHT, SOLD, EXCHANGED. Largest Moot In the We.t R. H. 
MORRIS, Auto Broker, 1818-20 Telegraph Are., Oakland, Gal. Established 
1901. 



VULCANIZING 

Stevens & Elkington Rubber Co. 

Phone Franklin 612 



524 Polk SI. near Golden Gate Ave. 



San Francisco, Cal. 



Electric Lamps, 


Bells 


,and Telephones 


SUPPLIES 




DYNAMOS 


MOTORS 




REPAIRS 


CENTURY ELECTRIC CONSTRUCTION CO. 


18 Fell St.. near Market. 




San Francisco 





KEENAN 


BROS. 






Automobile Engineers, Machinists and Blacksmiths. 




273 


Valencia street, San Francisco. 


Telephone Market 


1985. 



TIPS TO AUTOMOBILISTS 

14-MILE HOUSE — "fncle Tom's Cabin"* Automobile Supplies and re- 
pair shop. First-class accommodations. Cuisine unsurpassed on the 
Coast. "Andy. " formerly of the "Cliff House." 

PALO ALTO — Corbaley & Thorpe Auto Co.. Renting, repairing and 
sundries. Fire-proof garage. Day and night service. 443-9 Emerson St. 
Telephone Main 78. 



SAN JOSE — Reo el Stoddard- Dayton owners stop at Harrison P. 
Smith's garage. First and San Carlos streets. Motor car supplies and 

SAN JOSE— Lamolle Grill. 36-38 North First street The best Frenrh 
dinner in California 75c. or a la carte. Automobile parties given par- 
ticular attention. 

GILROY. CAL. — Geo. E. Tlce general machinist, expert repairing of 
automobiles and engines a specialty. Day or night service. 260 N Mon- 
B treet. 

SALINAS. CAL.— Hotel Hardin. Rates $2 per day and up. French chef. 
Best acco-nmodations. Roads excellent. G. Lapierre, Prop. 



26 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTBE 



July 20, 1907. 



jJntettBtutg Stabs (Lalb bg Notion iFtltptrais 



The following stories were collected from Filipino school-children by the writer, during his work on the islands as a science 
master. The title of the first story is "The Man Who Lived by Smell Alone." The plant referred to in this, the tale, is the 
Sterculi fetida, called "bobog" by the Visayans, and "calumpang" by llic Tagalogs. Its seeds yield a valuable oil, and it 
has digitate leaves. Its flowers, as both its generic and its specific botanical names imply, have a peculiar fetid odor. The 
name of the boy who told me the story is Restitute Mapa of Bacalod, Negros Occidental. 



Long, long ago there lived a man on the slope of Mount C'an- 
laon in the province of Negros Occidental. This man had a gar- 
den, which had been, planted by Uod and given to him. When 
God had placed him in the garden, he told him that the pretty 
flowers and fruits were put there to please his eyes, but he was 
not to pluck any of them. The sweet smells were to please his 
nostrils. The plants with bad smells were to keep him alive by 
supplying him with food, and the worse the odor of the plant 
the more delicious the food it would give. 

So this gardener never ate rice nor bread nor fruit, but when 
dinner time came, he went to a bad-smelling plant, and when he 
had smelled the bad odor, he became satisfied. The plant which 
he liked to smell the most was the bobog, for as its smell was 
the worst of all in the garden, so its food was the most delicious. 
The garden was enclosed on all sides by a wall, and there was a 
well in the center, from which he watered the plants of the gar- 
den. 

Now it came to pass that a merchant from the far-off land 
of Luzon embarked on the sea with merchandise to sell. But a 
great storm arose, and the ship sank to the bottom of the sea 
with all the crew and cargo. The merchant alone was cast ashore 
on the island of Negros, and after wandering, half dead with 
hunger, up the slopes of Mount Canlaon, he came to the garden 
in which the man lived all alone. The name of the gardener 
was Jaime, and the name of the merchant was Juan. 

Juan saw J.iime sprinkling the garden, and a.-ked him if he 
might rest in his house. "Very well," said Jaime, "yon may 
rest." Then Juan said: "Oh, my friend. I am very hungry; can 
you give me something to eat?" Jaime replied : "Excuse me, but 
I never eat, for my hunger is satisfied when 1 smell the perfume 
of the bobog. But you may come with me and satisfy your 
hunger, too, if you will promise not to tell any one about it." 
"[ thank you." said Juan, and when he had smelled (he bobog 
his hunger was satisfied also. 

Next day Juan went away, and after three days lie arrived at 
the place where Silay town is now placed. Juan lived on the way 
from the smell of the bobog which grew by the wayside. At 
Silay he found a ship which took him back to bis own country 
of Luzon. And Juan kept his secret, as he had promised to 
Jaime. But after some time Juan fell in love with the daughter 
of ili< Presidente of the town, and to her he told the secrel of 
the bobog plant. Bui (lie plant in Tagalog is called the calum- 
pang. The name of the Presidente's daughter was .Mercedes. 

Now, Mercedes was filled with a great desire to see the w ler- 

ful garden and the wonderful bobog of Negros, for the calum- 
pang of Luzon would not satisfy an] one's hunger, although it 
was the same plant as that in Negros. So she took three of 
her father's servants with her, and journeyed to the island of 
NTegros. She made her way all alone up the slope of Mount 
Canlaon, and at last reached the magic garden very hungry ;nnl 
tired. And Jaime satisfied her hunger with the .smell of the 
bobog. 

Then Mercedes said: "Do you wish to sell your garden?" and 
Juan replied: "Oh, miss, please excuse me. Mil I do no! like." 
Then she said: "Will you exchange it for my father's great 
hacienda?" and she told him how large it was. and Jaime said: 
"Oh, mi--, please excuse me, but I do not like." At lasl Merce- 
des -.iid: "Oh. Jaime, will you marry me?" and Jaime said: 
"I will." And so they were married, and live, I ji, i],,. wonderful 
garden, and most of the present people of Negros are their de- 
scendants. And so Jaime gained a wil'e because he had fed the 
hungry ship-wrecked merchant, and Juan losl a wil'e because he 
could not keep a secret. Aftei many days, the descendants of 
Jaime and Mercedes grew very lazy, because they could easily 



satisfy their hunger with the smell id' the bobog plant, and so 
God took away the virtues from the bobog, and then the people 
of Negros had to work for their food. When they began to do this 
they drove the small "negritos" into the mountains, where they 
still are. 

It is difficult to know what to think of this story. It has a 
slight, resemblance to the biblical narrative of Adam and Eve 
in the garden of Eden. It seems, also, to be an at tempt at a solu- 
tion of the problem why bad-smelling plants exist. It implies 
that everything in nature has its uses, and that man is the center 
i .nation. The sweet perfumes of the Sowers were intended 
for him, and the had smells of plants had some relation to him 
also. Like most primitive philosophies, and like ours, too, up to 
a recent date, man is considered to be the central pivot of nature. 
Everything in it was intended for him. Nowadays botanists 
tell us that flowers bloom, not for us, but in order to attract 
insects, and that fruits have attractive colors in order to be 
seen and then eaten by animals, so that their seeds may be 
spread. Plants, too, have bad smells in order to escape being 
eaten by their enemies. 

The reference to the "negritos" in the lasl sentence would ap- 
pear to indicate that they never lived on the smell of plants, be- 
ing .hi inferior people to that "chosen" people, the Visayans. 

The next story is entitled "'The Woman Who Marries Eer 
Own Sun." Ii\ Miss Severina Anlap of Bacolod. It hears a 
strange resemblance in the iale of the old (livek tragedians, in 
which Oedipus marries his own mother. Jocasta. 

"There was once a man who lived with his wife in the island 
of Negros. They had only one son, whose name was Dionisio. 
When the boy was eight months old. his mother wished to know 
the fortune of her man child, and she wen! to a Fortune teller. 
The fortune teller told her that she must kill her son. for when 
he grew up he would bring very bad luck to both his father and 
his mother. 

"The poor mother did nol want In kill her son, so she bit its 
rump very deep, so a- in leave a mark there. She then placed 
her son in a basket and placed it among the sedges near the 
banks of (he river. Every morning she went out in teed her son 
where il lived ill the filiating basket. 



a 



M 



DOCTORS 

who h«vo had experience with 

Sfycozone 

Endorse and successfully use it In the treatment of 
DYSPEPSIA 

and other stomach diseases. GLTCOZONB is absolutely harmless. 
It cleanses the lining membrane of the stomach, and subdues in- 
flammation, thus helping nature to accomplish a cure, which ac- 
counts for the gratifying results that are obtained. To con- 
vince Dyspeptics that GL.VCOZONE cannot fail to help them, I 
will send to any one mentioning this magazine and enclosing 25c. 
to pay forwarding charges 

A $1.00 Bottle Free 
(Only one bottle to a family.) 




Sold by leading 

druggists. 
None genuine 
without 
my signature. 



64 F Prince Street*, New York 

FREE! Valuable booklet on How to Treat Diseases. 



July 30, 1907. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



27 



"One night a great storm arose and swept the child and basket 
away down the river. It went Moating past a house where a 
poor man lived with his wife. This poor man saw the basket 
floating down Ui,. riu'i', so he took it and found in it the very 
pretty boy. He took the boy home to his wile, and said to her: 
'Let as take tins bo] as our son, for we have no son of our own.' 

"Tliis boy became a man, and one day he said to his father: 
'Father, what work shall I do?' His foster-father was king's 
gardener, so he took the boy to the king, and Dionisio was sent 
in help his lather in the garden. In the garden there grew a 
peach Hie, and the peaches on it looked very nice, so the boy 
took one of the peaches and ate it. Now the king used to couni 
the number of peaches on that tree every morning. 

"Next morning the king went to the peach free and knew that 
one of the peaches was missing. So he killed the boy and threw 
his body over the fence, and said, 'The one who first sees his 
body and weeps over it is his mother.' And it happened that the 
woman who was his real mother passed that way and saw the 
body and was very sorry to see it. So she wept over it, and then 
took it home. When she got home the body became alive again. 
And the young man became the husband of the woman. 

"One day the young man was sleeping, and the woman saw the 
mark of the bite on his rump, so she awoke him and told him 
that he was her son. Then the two were very sad, and they went 
arm in arm and jumped into the river and were drowned." 

It should perhaps be stated here that Filipino children have a 
black mark over the end of the spine. Some unkind people say 
that il marks the place where the tail dropped off. 

John Stuart. 



BANKING 



THE TEARFUL WOMAN. 

"I've no complaint against her except that she snivels all day 
long and whines half the night. I've tried my best to please her, 
but it's no use. I can't stand it any longer." 

And the judge promptly instructed the juiy to grant the re- 
quest for the divorce the man was asking for from his "weeping" 
wile. The jury sided with the man, notwithstanding that the 
wile sal, there and wept copiously. And men are supposed to 
be all tenderness before tears. 

The whole ease was so sodden and lachrymose that only a 
tear-proof sensitiveness could stand the ordeal of even listening 
to it. it was the old, old story of the woman who weeps m Bea- 
smi and out. of season — merely for the joy of having a jag of 
the amotions. 

Like tiie poor, we have the tearful woman always with us. 
Her nose reddens and droops, her mouth sags, her complexion 
is colorless, her eyes are dull blue and dead, and the woes of 
the whole universe are her 0WI1 special grief. She is convinced 
that her nerves are too acute for this wicked world. As a matter 
of truth, thej are in a State of chronic inertia — her list! 
is a species of sellishness, a dullness to the lives of those about 
her — absolute insensibility to any one Inn her own abused 
Hothing really moves her. If it did, she would know thai the 

tree joys of life are as much for her as thej a hers. 

The "sensitive girl" has a host of tender-hearted friends 
while she is iii her teens, ami still possesses i the radiant ■ 

of girlhood. Their especial business is to smooth out the wrinkles 
in the "sensitive" girl's life, stroking the rallied plumage of In-.' 
unappeasable \ mity. Sometimes, one of this 
hut usually she considers no man good enough for her. If she 
remains sin onchinese and grumpineas tills the atmos- 

phere of hex neighborhood. The unfeeling hand of fate 
reaching out all the time to give her a cruel whack. I' 

9 her at every corner. A Nemesis tracks her wherever 
oes, Her tears and snivels accompany her as a shadow. 

Km when she marries, her troubles really begin, lien are all 
brutes, ami as for children — well, dear me, she never could en- 
dure their racket. It would surely kill her. It would be about 
as satisfactory to argue with a sphinx as to attempt to convince 

it all the world has its special grief, and that hers 
exceptional 

The man who has to endure the deluge of woe that saturates 
the atmosphere in the vicinity of the Tearful Woman is entitled 
to the pity Kind-hearted mortal. She is too go 

mi-butter domesticity _ od for men 

tals. and should s own kind, whet 

is properly rated as one of the exquisite amusemen • 
be appreciated only by highly-orgauized human mevhanisms. 



Thi Canadian Bank of Commerce 



With which are amalgamated the Bank of British Columbia, the Halifax 
Banking Co. and the Merchants' Bank of Prince Edward Island. 
HEAD OFFICE— TORONTO. 

Paid-up Capital {10.000,000. Reserve Fund $5,000,000 

Aggregate Resources, over {113,000,000 

B. E. WALKER, President. ALEX. LAIRD, General Manager 

LONDON OFFICE— 60 Lombard St., L. C. 

NEW YORK OFFICE— 16 Exchange Place. 

BRANCHES IN BRITISH COLUMBIA— Atlin, Cranbrook, Fernlt 
Greenwood, Kamloops, Ladysmith, Nanaimo, Nelson, New Westminster, 
Pentlcton, Prince Rupert, Princeton, Vancouver (3), and Victoria. 

lUKON TERRITORY— Dawson and White Horse. 

UNITED STATES— Portland. Seattle and Skagway (Alaska.) 

OTHER BRANCHES— Alberta, 26; Saskatchewan, 18; Manitoba, 20; 
Ontario and Quebec, 62; Maritime Provinces, 19. 

BANKERS IN LONDON— The Bank of England, The Bank of Scot- 
land, Lloyd's Bank, Ltd., The Union of London, and Smith's Bank Ltd. 

AGENTS IN CHICAGO— The First National Bank. 

AGENTS IN NEW ORLEANS— The Commercial National Bank. 

SAN FRANCISCO— Main otttce, 326 California St. Branch— Cor. Van 
Ness and Eddy. 
A. KAINS, Manager. BRUCE HEATHCOTE, Asst. Manager. 



Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco 



Building at 7 06 Market St., Opposite Third. 

Guaranteed Capital, $1,000,000 Paid-up Capital, $300,000 

Surplus, $320,000. Assets, $10,000,000 

James D. Phelan, President; John A. Hooper, First Vice-President; 

lames K. Moffltt, Second Vice-President; George A. Story, Cashier; C. 

B. Hobsorj. Asst. Cashier; A. E. Curtis, 2nd. Asst. Cashier. 

Directors — James D. Phelan, John A. Hooper, JamesK. Mofntt, Frank 
J. Sullivan, Robert McElroy, Rudolph Spreckels, Charles Holbrook. 

Interest paid on deposits. Loans on approved securities. Deposits may 
be sent by postal order, Wells, Fargo & Co., or exchange on city banks. 



The Anglo-Californian Bank, Limited 



E. C. 



Head Office — 18 Austin Friars, London. 

Capital Authorized, $6,000,000 Paid-up, $1,500,000 

Subscribed, $3,000,000 Reserve Fund, $700,000 

The bank transacts a general banking business, sells drafts, makes 
telegraphic transfers, and issues letters of credit available throughout 
the world. Sends bills for collection, loans money, buys and sells ex- 
change and bullion. 

IGN. STEINHART, P. N. LILIENTHAL, Managers. 
. FRIEDLANDER. Cashier. 



Central Trust Company of California 



42 Montgomery Street, Corner Sutter. 
Assets, $6,000,000 Paid-up Capital and Reserve, $1,750,000 

Authorized to act as Executor, Administrator, Guardian or Trustee, 
Check accounts solicited. Legal depository for money in Probate Court 
proceedings. Interest paid on Savings Accounts at 3 6-10 per cent per 
annum. 



London, Paris and American Bank, Ltd. 



N. W. COR. SANSOME AND SUTTER STS. 

Subscribed Capital, $2,600,000. Paid-up Capital. $2,000,000 

Reserve Fund. $1,200,000. 

Head Office — 40 Threadneedle St. London, E. C. 

AGENTS — New York — Agency of the London. Paris and American 

Bank. Limited, No. 10 Wall street, N. Y.; Paris — Messrs. Lazard Freres 

& Cle. 17 Boulevard Poissonler. Draw direct on the principal cities of 

the world. Commercial and Travelers' credits Issued. 

S. Greenebaum I , , 

H. Flei.hh.cker I Manasera 

R. Alwchul. Caahier 



The German Savings & Loan Society 



526 California St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Guaranteed Capital and Surplus $2.6" 

1 Capital at tually paid 1,00 

ts, .inn.- aS, 1907 

Officers— President, P. Tillmann, Jr.; First Vice-President, Daniel 

nler, A. II. R. Schmidt; 
t Cashier. 

neral Attorni 
: of Directors— F. Tillmann, Jr.; Daniel Meyer, Emil R"hte. lgn. 
Stelnhart, I. N. Walter, N Ohlandt, .1 W. Van Bergen, E. T. Kmse anil 
« S. Goodfellow. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Crown Point Gold and Silver Mining Company. 
Location of principal place of business — San Francisco, Cal. Location 
of works — Gold Hill. Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors. 
held on the 20th day of June ly07. an assessment (No. 97) of ten cents 
per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, payable 
immediately in United States gold cotn. to the Secretary, at the office 
of the company, room 916 Koht Building. N. E. corner California and 
Montgomery streets. San Francisco. California. 
Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on the 
MTH DAY OF JULY, 
will be delinquent, and advertised lor sale at public auction, and unless 
payment is made before, will be sold on WEDNESDAY, the 14th day 
i August. 1907, to pay the delinquent assessment, together with the 
< est of advertising and expenses of sale. 
By order of the Board of Directors. 

C. L. McCOY, Secretary. 
office — Room 916. Kohl Building. N. E. corner California and Mont- 
gomery streets. San Francisco. California. 



DON'T BORROW TROUBLE. 

SAPOLIO 



BUY 



'TIS CHEAPER IN THE END. 



28 



SAJST FRANCISCO NEWS LETTEE 



July SO, 1907. 




iANITE 



i&.^&tseu-.. 



living in Lorin was a happy young married couple, until re- 
cently, when the wife was struck" by the skatinp- craze. She had 
never entered a rink until a friend from Los Angeles came to 
visit, and in showing the visitor the sights, took in the Oakland 
rinks. The patient husband, fond of reading, did not mind 
staying home with the babies to let his wife have a good time 
with her girlhood friend, even if he did miss the cozy evenings 
they had enjoyed together before she came. The friend skated, 
and Mrs. Lorin caught the fever, and ere long she had learned. 
When a month had gone by, and it was time for the Los Angeles 
visitor to return, the neglected husband was glad. When Wed- 
nesday evening rolled around, Mrs. Lorin dressed to go out, tak- 
ing it for granted that her husband would contentedly read in 
her absence. Being a patient man he made no complaint until 
he found himself left alone one or two nights in the week. 
When he remonstrated, he was told that Lorin was a "lonesome 
town," and she required amusement. If he did not like to stay- 
home, he could hire a girl to look after the house and babies, 
something the wife knew he could not afford. One night there 
was to be a big masquerade affair at the rink, and Mrs. Lorin 
was very busy making her costume, something girlish and 
original. Mr. Lorin did a whole lot of thinking, but said 
nothing. When the eventful evening came, there was no one 
on the floor more gay or flirty than the lady from Lorin in fancy 
attire. The most favored and ardent of her many admirers was 
a youth in a dashing cowboy dress, who begged the privilege 
of seeing her home after she had repeatedly told him she was 
unmarried and heart free. However, she gave him the slip be- 
fore the hour for unmasking came. An hour later, when she 
entered her home, she was startled to see the self-same cowboy 
sitting in her husband's easy chair, reading exactly as she had 
left him hours before, except the change of clothes. Mrs. Lorin 
attends no more skating rinks, and has learned a lesson that 
will last for a life-time. 

• • • 

Down at Santa Cruz, where 'tis said there is never a dull 
moment, the G. A. I,'. and the W. R. C. have struck a new gait 
in the entertainment line. At a recent joint meeting of the two 
institutions. Martin H. KiJburn, a veteran of sixty-two sum- 
mers and three times a benedict, and Mrs. Nellie M. Merrick, 
were united in marriage beneath the stars and stripes. Verily) 
variety is the spice of life. 

* * * 

It seems that foot-ball was not sufficiently dangerous, as played 
on the regulation grid-iron. They are now plaving it in rinks 
on roller skates. Santa Cruz and San Jose have taken up the 
lad. We can next expect to hear that the game will be played 
with a pig-skin stuffed with nitro-glycerine, for 'lis averred 
by many that it is the element of danger connected with the game 
that makes it interesting. 

• » * 

It's a great pity that the wise men at the Santa Clara Observa- 
tory cannot discover some way of transporting the Gold Dusl 
Twins to the land of Old Sol, and let them scour those spot- off 
his face. They discovered the spots all right enough, and also 
that the old boy will raise as much of a disturbance over those 
same spots as the average boy does because he has to wash his 
lace before coming to the dinner table. 

* * * 

It is a cinch that if Dr. S. A. Knopf, that eminent German 
scientist who has started such a crusade against kissin°- were 10 
i isit Santa Cruz promulgating his drastic theories, he would be 
asked to leave town, at least until the season closes. Gee whizz ■ 
what would the summer girl do if the summer man were to ioin 
the crusade? Who (from the woman's standpoint) wants to be 
kissed beneath the car anyway, or on the cheek, either It's liable 
to leave a spot. One who has noticed the faces of the women at 
Santa Cruz suggests it would be safer to take long chances on 
the great white plague than play even on lead poisoning from 
cheek-bestowed caresses. 



Santa Cruz recently entertained one really distinguished 
guest, in the person of Mrs. Fablinger, of Campbell. Distin- 
guished, inasmuch as she is the youngest daughter of old John 
Brown, of Harper's Ferry fame." She is the mother of eleven 
children, while her illustrious father was the sire of twenty. 
She was the motif of several dinner parties given by old-time 
friends. 

* * * 

Among the newspaper correspondents who were given medals 
by the Emperor of Japan the other day was Jack London. But 
of course, being a socialist, who believes in shouting "To hell 
with the Constitution and all royalty," he will refuse. Perhaps 
the Emperor did not know that London was a Socialist. 

* * * 

A fashionable lady, with a little girl, boarded the Telegraph 
avenue car in Oakland the other day. " The child was one of those 
posing, precocious children who 'talk incessantly in public. 
Finally she made use of some siang phrase, and the fond mother 
elevated her eye-brows in mock horror, and said: "Thelma, never 
again let me hear you use slang. Now remember ! Cut it out !" 

» * * 

Mr. Lewis Van Ness, one of the owners of the Five Pine Mine, 
in Trinity County, who was recently married to Miss Grace 
Thrasher, of Gridley, has been spending a few days in Oakland. 
previous to having for Trinity County, where he will spend tin 
summer- in looking after his mining 'interests. Upon their re- 
turn, Mr. and Mrs. Van Xess will reside in Oakland. 

* * * 

^ The are department of Mill Valley enjoyed a ball this week. 
The department has been recently reorganized, and has done 
some very creditable work under its new officers. 

* * * 

Mill Valley has passed a curfew ordinance, and children un- 
der sixteen years of age are not allowed on the street after 
eight o'clock alone. 

* * * 

Because he thought it his duty as a Christian minister to op- 
pose the saloon business in West Berkeley, the Reverend G. H. 
Wilkins finds the following placard fastened to an effigy on the 
steps of the Westminster Presbyterian Church, of which he is 
pastor : 

"This represents the Reverend .Mr. Wilkins, the everlasting 
intermedler in other people's affairs. Sir: You will have to 
make up your mind to stop blackmailing us people, or else you 
will have some trouble ahead of von. 'it will not be tolerated 
any longer in our midst. By order of the Peace Association." 

Now, such cowardly attacks are to he expected from the ele- 
ment which the minister is fighting, but what is to be said of 
W llliam Edwards, president of the hoard of trustees of the West- 




-as millions ot oiht-rs have — The One 
Ferfect Collar Button. Have you? 



iade from one piece, cannot break by usc- 
INSURED: You get a new one 
if damaged from any cause. 



>HAPED 
MADE 
WEAR 



Thename"Krementz"and the quality— guar- 
anteed— stamped on the back of every genuine 
button. Don't take substitutes. Krementz 
"plate" contain more gold than 
'•laied buttons of other make; out- 
wear them many times. 

All first-class jewelers and haber- 
'ia^hers sell them. 

Booklet free on request. 

KREMENTZ & CO. 

21 Chestnut St. Newark. N.J. 






Jul? 20, 1907. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



29 



minster Church, when he gives interviews of the following 
character: 

"I think he 'butted in' at the wrong time and in the wrong 
way. Now, I have no objection to him stopping any of our 
young men who might be in the habit of visiting saloons and 
saying, 'My young friend, that is a bad place for you,' or some 
advice to that effect, but 1 think that in attacking a man's busi- 
ness he did wrong. We didn't hire him to fight with our citi- 
zens. We hired him to preach our sermons at our own church." 

And now hear what the trustee's wife has to say: 

"You know a great many influential church members have 
dropped out since the liquor business came up. Where we could 
always depend upon them for donations before, we now find it 
impossible to raise a cent." 

It may be remarked in passing that perhaps the church in 
question better close its doors, and inasmuch as the trustees are 
talking of requesting their pastor to resign, it might be well 
for the minister to go where his congregation, at least, might 
stand back of him in a fight wherein the morals of the commun- 
ity, as he sees them, are concerned. 

The ousting of Pistolesi, by the San Francisco Yacht Club, 
while rather tardy, nevertheless is commendable. The trustees 
of Sausalito, Supervisor of Marin County, attorney for the pool 
rooms, and general political Poo-Bah of Marin County, is hardly 
the man that could be found congenial in any club, even if his 
attack on the organization were not of such a character that it 
could not well overlook it and keep ils self-respect. 

* * * 

Trustee Martin, of Sausalito, had al leas! the decency to ab- 
sent himself from the Board meeting when the pool rooms were 

licensed for another term. 

* * * 

Mr. and Mrs. Carlos G. White Dr. Stephen Wythe, Willson 
Wythe, Misses Grace, Alice and Margaret Wythe, left Oakland 
this week for a month's outing in the Yosemile Valley. 

Residing in one of the aristocratic neighborhoods of Oakland 
is a lady of wealth, which she has gained through marriage. She 
is very purse-proud, and arrogant with those of less fortunate 
circumstances. With the employees of her household she has the 
reputation of being extremely arbitrary. The fact that she pays 
higher wages than some of her neighbors, she evidently believes, 
gives her the right, lo be oppressive with those who serve in her 
household. At least that is the reputation she bears around the 
employment offices, where help meet and freely discuss the vir- 
tues and shortcomings of former employers. A story is being 
told of this lady which is causing certain members of ■ 
considerable amusement as to how her pride bad a fall. It seems 
that news of her wealth reached England, and stirred up a poor 
relation in the shape of a brother, who declared, despite his sis- 
ter's objections, "that America was the 
place for him." Thai he was bound to 
see California if he hail to work his way 

iiv SI 

Rather than have him come in this 
manner, the money was forwarded, BO that 
he might fit himself nut in propi 
and come "first-class" to California. 

The intention was. as soon as possible 
after he arrived, lo ship him up into the 
country to superintend a ranch before any 
of her stylish acquaintances had a chance 
to meet him. lie arrived safely, and 
greatly enjoyed the aristocratic surround- 
ings to which be was unaccustomed, and 
d his pail well enough, until an un- 
lucky day arrived, when the Irish cook 
gave noti( e of leaving. 

Her mistress, not at all disturbed. 
'v telephoned for another, and was 
delighted to learn that an excellent cook. 
freshly arrived from England, was ready 
to take the position. This was gratifying 
and she was engaged at once. When 
the family met at breakfast the follow- 
ing morning, every one was good-natured, 
and things seemed to be getting on fine. 
Until the new girl entered to serve the 
When her eves rested on the 



brother from England, a startled look of recognition over-spread 
her features, while the young man turned red and looked verj 
nervous. The Bharp eyes of his sister took in the situation, and 
she was furiously angry. 

When the meal was over, she questioned him about the cir- 
cumstance, and he innocently explained that he recognized the 
young woman as a maid who worked for his "boss" at home. 
Then she sought the girl, and questioned her as to where she had 
previously mei her guest. She nearly collapsed when the cook, 
with all frankness, told her that she and ''George were particular 
friends : that they had met in the steerage on the steamer coming 
over;" that she had lost track of him in New York, and was 
naturally surprised to meet him in California. It seems that he 
had come by steerage to save money, never imagining his sister 
would find it out. The girl who was the innocent cause of the 
exposure retained her position, and the economical brother was 
shipped to a ranch in Sonoma County, where he lives contentedly 
and never visits Oakland. 



There are dont's in everything, but it is better to have them 
by heart than to undergo the humiliation of having a guide, a 
forest warden or friend din them in your ears continually while 
you are in the woods. 

Don't build a camp fire until all the dry leaves and inflam- 
mable materials have been raked away to a safe distance. 

Don't go away and leave your camp lire burning. Extinguish 
it completely before you move on. 

Don't leave a smudge burning while you are abseid. 

Don't throw down a lighted match or a stub of a cigar. When 
you light your cigar or pipe, extinguish the match before throw- 
ing it on the ground. 

Don't set fire to a redwood tree for the fun of the thing. 

Don't burn a bee tree, yellow-jacket nest or use Hie to smoke 
out game until every possible precaution is taken to prevent the 
flames from spreading. 

Don't go away and leave the tree on lire. 

Don't carry firearms during fishing season. 

Don't carry fishing tackle during hunting season. 

Don't throw old cans around indiscriminately. 

Don't throw newspapers, paste-board and scraps about. 

Don't defile the springs with meat scraps, papers, bottles and 
refuse. 

Don't do a thing in the woods you wouldn't do in a parlor. 

Don't bo a hoodlum because you are away from police restraint. 
Keniember others have rights. 



TEE LITTLE PALACE HOTEL. 

The musical programme that is rendered at the Palace is one 
of the many attractions of this most popular hotel. 



REFRIGERATORS 

THE ALASKA 

Is universally conceded to be THE BEST in 
the market 

1000 

now in stock — 70 styles and sizes. Opal, White 
Enameled, Zinc Lined. Suitable for Families, 
Hotels, Restaurants.Cafes.and Boarding Houses 



W. W. MONTAGUE & CO. 

CORNER POLK AND TURK STREETS 



■;o 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 20, 190? 






73>ie numerous small lakes and 


The 


streams adjacent make this resort 


Tallac, 


headquarters for rod fisherman. 


Lake 


San Franciscans are especially 


invited to write for terms for their 


Tahoe, 


families. 


Gal. 


cTW. LAWRENCE £& CO. 




Tallac. 




Open the year round. The springs that HOLD 
THE RECORD for business during 1906. The 
Reasons: Wonderful curative properties of the 
waters; superb service; exce.ient table; easy of 
access. Every modern improvement has been 
added to this already famous resort. The wat- 
ers contain sulphur, alum, iron, soda, magnesia, 
iodine and traces of arsenic, and are very effi- 
cacious in cases of rheumatism, neuralgia, 
rheumatic gout, kidney and liver diseases, lead 
and mercurial poisoning and all bladder and 
urinary complaints. 

Hunting and trout fishing; amusements of all 
kinds. Our table is our advertisement. Rates 
$12 to $17.50 a week. Baths free. Trains leave 
Third and Townsend streets at 8:30 a. m. Direct 
stage connections for the springs. Send for 
booklet. Address W. J. McDONALD, Proprie- 
tor. 



Hotel 

Bon 

Air 


Newly renovated and now under first-class 
management. Hot and cold water in every room. 
Delightfully located in heart of Ross Valley. 
Take Sausalito Ferry to Escalle. Only 45 min- 
utes from San Francisco. Ideal home for busi- 
ness men and families. Open the year round. 
Terms reasonable. For further particulars ad- 
dress STRASSBURGER & PARKER, Fostofnce, 
Larkspur, Cal. 




THE SWITZERLAND OF CALIFORNIA. 
Most delightfully situated on banks of Russian 
River. Rates $2 per day. $12 per week For fur- 
ther particulars, address C. F. CARR, Monte 
Rio, Sonoma County, California. 



The 


FOR AN OUTING ON RUSSIAN RIVER. 


$10 per week and up. Everything good. 


Palms 


Tents if desired. H. B. CROCKER, Healds- 


burg, California. 




THE nearest Hot Sulphur Springs to San 
Francisco. Largest mineral water swimming 
tank In the State. No staging. 4 trains dally. 
For information, address THEO. RICHARDS, 
Agua Caliente, Sonoma County, Cal. 



SANTA CRUZ 

The Atlantic City of the Pacific 

World's most beautiful playground 

Never a Dull Moment 

Summer Season opens May 1st 



Grand Opening of New Casino and Bathing 
Pavilion announced later 



Hot 
Springs 



Witter 

Medical 

Springs 



The 

Geysers 
Hot 
Springs 



Skaggs 

Hot 
Springs 



Tassajara 

Hot 
Springs 



New Ownership and Management. Grandest 
and most accessible of all resorts. Only seven 
miles of beautiful staging. Waters awarded 
first prize at St. Louis Exposition. 

Natural hoi soda, sulphur, plungeand tub baths, 104 to I16de 
greet, for rheumatism, malaria and all stomach troubles. Iron and 
& rsenic waters; altitude 1400 feet. Swimming tank, hunting, fine 
fishing, bowling, tennis, croquet, dancing; gas. Expert maiseurte 
Round trip. $8. Rates. $10 50 to $16, baths included. Table 
unexcelled. 

Information at any S. P. office or H. H. Mc_ 
GOWAN, Proprietor and Manager, Paraiso 
Spiings, Monterey county, Cal. 



Witter, the moat famous medical springs in 
the West. In the heart of the mountains! 
commanding a magnificent view of Clear Lake. 
The automobile headquarters of Lake County. 
You can play tennis, ride, bowl, fish and bathe 
in the lakes or climb mountains. In Witter 
Springs you will find a first class place at a 
reasonable rate. 

Write for information lo ALBERT J. ARROLL, Manager, 
at the Springs, or to the General Offices of Witter Springs Co., 647 
Van Ness Ave., San Francisco. 



America's greatest health and pleasure resort. 
Positive cure for rhumatlsm, stomach trouble. 
Natural mineral steam and hot mineral plunge 
baths. Tepid swimming lake. Good fishing and 
hunting. Climate unsurpassed. Our table 
speaks for Itself. All kinds of outdoor amuse- 
ments; dancing every evening. Livery and 
dairy connected with hotel. Rates, $10 to $14 
per week. Electric lights, telephone and post- 
office In hotel. Round trip tickets via North- 
western Pacific R. R. For further particulars, 
address R. H. CURRY, Proprietor, The Geysers, 
Sonoma County, Cal. 



SONOMA COUNTY. Only 4 1-2 hours from 
San Francisco and but 9 miles staging. Stages 
meet both morning and evening trains to and 
from San Francisco at Geyserville. Round-trip 
only $5.10. Terms, $2 a day or $12 a week. 
Reference: Any guest of the past 12 years. In- 
formation at Peck-Judah Bureau, 789 Market 
street, Bryan's Bureau, 1732 Fillmore St., or of 
J. F. Mulgrew, Skaggs, Cal. 



Monterey County. Best health and pleasure re- 
sort in California. Eighteen hot mineral springs, 
hot sulphur plunges; wonderful vapor baths; 
trout fishing; $12 to $14. Stage leaves Salinas 
Monday. Wednesday and Friday mornings. Peck 
Information Bureau, 789 Market street, San 
Francisco, or C. W. QUILTY, Tassajara Hot 
Springs, Monterey County. 



JTJLI -.'ii. L907. 



ANT) CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



31 







LAK.E. Wl'RVX. HAL 

UNDER THE NEW MANAGEMENT 

of 

MARINER & CRAIG 

Write and secure rates for a long stay at the Springs. 
A new garage for the accommodation of Automobile 
tourists. Rates & 12.00 to 116.00 per week. 




The New 

Vendome 

San Jose 

Thoroughly rebuilt and 
refurnished Unexcel- 
led cuis ; ne. Every 
modern convenience, 
charmingly located in 
beau til u I park, swim- 
ming pools, bowling 
alleys, tennis courts, 
also sample rooms for 
commercial men down 

town. A delightful place to spend the summer. Rates reasonable. 

Addren: HOTEL VENDOME COMPANY 



WHEN IN LOS ANGELES STOP AT TBE 



Hotel Westminster 



European Plan & 1-00 per day and up. 
With bath SI. 50 and up. 

Moderate Priced Cafe; Unexcelled Caiaina; Centrally 
Located; 100 Rooms with Bath 

Fourth and Main Streets, Los Angeles, California 

F. 0. JOHNSON, Proprietor 



Glenbrook 

LAKE COUNTY, CAL. 



In the heart of the forest. Good hunting and fishing. Pleasant 
drives and walks. Amusements of all kinds. Excellent table. 
Rates $10 to $14 per week. For further particulars apply to 
tTWRS. S. TREADWAY, Glenbrook P. O.. Lake Co., Cal. 



Blue Lakes 



Send for pamphlets. $10 to $12 
per week. O. WEISMAN, Mid- 
lake, Lake County, Cal. 



The Original 
White Sulphur Springs 



Until New Hotel Buildings are 
erected guests can be accommodat- 
ed at private table, home plan, for 
limited number. Communicate 
with MR. and MRS. JOHN SAN- 
FORD, St. Helena, Napa Co.,Cal. 



Vichy Springs, 
Mendocino. 
Co., Gal. 



Celebrated for Beauty Bath. Pronounced by 
experts a natural skin bettutifler. Write for 
booklet. J. A. REDEMEYER, Prop. 



Soda 

Bay 

Springs 

Lake Co., Cal. 



Situated on the picturesque shore of Clear 
Lake. Finest of boating, bathing, hunting and 
fishing; unsurpassed accommodations; new 
launch, accommodating 40 people, built ex- 
pressly for the use of guests and excursions. 
Terms, ?2 per day, $12 per week; special rates 
to families.- Take Tiburon Ferry. 7:40 a. m.. 
thence by rail to Pieta, then stage or automo- 
bile direct to springs. Rpund trip, good for 
six months. $9. Further information, address 
Peck-Judah Bureau, 789 Market street. Bryan's 
Bureau. 1732 Fillmore street. Managers, and 
J. McBrlde and Agnes Bell Rhoads, Soda Bav 
Springs, Lake County. Cal., via Kelseyville 
Postofflce. 



Howard 
Springs 

Lake Co., Cal. 



Cures all cases of kidney and liver trouble. 
The friend of the rheumatic and gout patient; 
42 mineral springs. Hot sulphur and iron 
plunge baths. Magnesia tub baths. References 
--Any guest for the last twenty years. Rates. 
$12 to $16 per week. Fare from San Francisco, 
$9 round trip. Leave San Francisco 7.30 a. m., 
via S. P., or 8 a. m. via Cal. and Northwestern 
R. R. Send for catalogue, or address J. W. 
LA YMANCE. Owner and Manager, Howard 
Springs, Lake County, Cal. 



There's Only One Del Monte 

Golf, Sea-Bathing, Motoring. Parlor Car from San Francisco 
twice daily. Special week end rates. Free Art exhibition and 
sales gallery of California painters. Week end golf tournament 
during the summer. 

Inquire Peck-Judah Co., 789 Market St. Information Bureau 
Southern Pacific, Flood Building or Del Monte, California ,H. R- 
Warner .Manager, 



Ranchella 



An ideal home in the Santa Cruz Mountains, 
surrounded by beautiful grounds, five miles 
from Santa Cruz, in the Redwood belt. Beau- 
tiful drives, good trout fishing. Telephone' 
gas. $10. Address MRS. E. H. BUNTING, 
R. F. D. 87. Santa Cruz. Cal 



STOP at, Lhe 




"KEY ROUTE 


INN" 


22nd Street, and Broadway, Oakland 

CONVENIENT TO SAN FRANCISCO 
BY FREQUENT TRAINS FROM 
THE HOTEL ARCADE 


M. S. Mullan 

Manager 



3* 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 30, 1907. 







/J.YA'S. 

(Hi ! rose leaves, falling, Boating, 

So impatient to be free, 
Have ye no sigh at leaving 

Your guardian mother-tree? 
Why all so i|\ik'k to listen 

When ill' 1 careless breezes woo? 
] or 3ad.-h.necl twilight cometh, 

And their love is gone from ybu! 

They breathe but for the morning, 

And upon her wings they fly ; 
Sweet are those balmy kisses. 

But kissing so ye die ! 
Oh, staj ! For babj flowerets 

Have yet in life a part, 
To cling with tender E Iness 

About a Mother's heart. 

(Hi ! Child! Thou Rose of Roses, 

1 lod's Flower beyond compare ! 
Wouldst learn my measure's burden, 

And read the message there? 
Wen there no buds to cherish. 

Were blossoms horn wide-blown, 
Why Love, Dear Ldve, would wither, 

And Heaven be aye unknown. 
— Violet A. Simpson in Pictorial Review. 



SPENCERIAN 



uSrzzLfteA/s — - 



Yon won't be bothered with a pen that balks 
or splatters the ink If you buySpencertan Pfna. 

They are made of the best steel by expert 
hand workers, and are Doted for evenness of 
point and uniformity. 

There's a Spencerinn Pen made for every 
style of writing. » 

We will send you a sampleoardof 12 pens, dif- 
ferent patterns, upon receiptor 6 contain postage. 
SPENCERIAN PEN CO.. 349 Broadway New fork. 



When Japan has more money than she has use for, and 

i- well supplied with war craft as the United StateB is, and 

can arrange with Russia to stay at home and attend to her own 

business, she may take under prayerful consideration the dan- 
ger of stepping on the tail of Uncle Sam's coat. 



THE HOUSE ON THE HILL. 

When the soul of it had fled 
Why should the house remain? 
To visit it was pain 
When the soul of it had fled. 

The swift flames pierced it through. 
Poor Hon- ' soul had fled; 

'though wet with Memory's dew. 
The swift flames [>ieree<l it through. 

While She, past scathe and 51 
Lives in some other star, 
Yet Memory throned her still 
In the House upon the Bill. 
-Charlotte Mellen Packard in New England Magazine*, 



Fairmont. Hotel 

SAN FRANCISCO 
The Most Superbly Situated Hotel in the World 

EUROPEAN PLAN 

AD rooms outside; every room with a bath 
Rates $2.50 and upward. Special terms 
to permanent, guests. Management, of 

The PALACE HOTEL COMPANY 



it 



HER CHOSEN LAND. 

Dear restless wanderer! now she dreams 
Of her own native hills and streams; 
Though sunnier climes her eye may see, 
Her heart to-day, in memory . 
Turns back to the blue arching dome 
Of skies above her childhood home. 

— Eugene C. Dolson in Putno/m's Monthly. 



"\ 



Hotel St. Francis 





Grill Room 


The 


Best Service 


The 


Best Meals 



SAN FRANCISCO 

Take Your Friends There 
For Luncheon 



V. 



J 



BRAVERY. 



To -land where verging pathways won. 
To hear an irksome duty sue. 
When just within one's eager reach 
Are beckoning sail and gleaming beach, 
And then, in duty's bonds, to turn 
With weary steps and eyes that hum 
Back to the life that cries its need: 
Ah! this is bravery indeed! 
— Margaret N. Ooodnow in New England Magazine. 

The music at the Little Palace Hotel is a feature that 

'ends much to the enjoyment of the visitor. The orchestra is 
unusually good. 







1 


M§\ a New 




m : s? Dog 
^&*f^ Kestaurant 






M'. /-v and 

L ^A ) FI 1 N. W. Corner 

mm? PoIk s Post s,s - 


~ 




\~\ ^^^J^, Phone San Francisco 




^ Franklin 2960 




' 



THE FAIRLAWN 



Phone Merrill 38 

Fruitvale Avenue and Bellevue Street, Fruilvale. California 

Ju«t Completed. P. H. & M. L. ZAPPETTIN1. Proprietor*. Everything first clan. 




M 
P 

K 





SHOES FITTED WITH O'SULLIVAN'S " HEELS OF NEW 

RUBBER MAKE LIFE OF MEN AND WOMEN WORTH LIVING 

Be calm and quiet; the clatter aod clink ol hard leather heels and naili are 
no longer tolerable. 

O'Sullivan heeli are made of brand new rubber. That's why ihey give 
the elastic, bounding, comfortable, springy step of youth; that's why they 
outwear leather heels and all other rubber heeli. 

If your dealer hasn't O'Sullivan's. send 35c. and diagram of your heel to 
the malcen. 

O'SULLIVAN RUBBER CO.. Lowell. NW 



A PAPER FOR ENGLISHMEN ABROAD 

" 'Public Opinion' was very much prized by Thomas Carlyle, and 
was one of the last journals he read," said Dr. W. R. Nicholl in 
British Weekly, May 2, 1907. 

PUBLIC OPINION 

Twopence Weekly 

Edited by PERCY L. PARKER. 

The purpose of "Public Opinion" is to provide a weekly review 
of current thought and activity as they are expressed in the 
world's newspapers, magazines and books, and to put on record 
the ideas and activities which make for Religious, Intellectual, 
Political and Social Progress. 

Jt seeks to provide the busy man with a lucid summary of what 
is happening in the different fields of human activity, and to focus 
within readable compass something of that teeming interest which 
coiiH-s from being in touch with many phases of life. 

This object has been achieved with considerable success ever 
since "PUBLIC OPINION" was started in 1860. In the 47 years 
since then it has consistently carried out its policy. 

The need for a paper like "PUBLIC OPINION" increases with 
the years, for life becomes more complex, and the busy man, 
though anxious to keep In touch with new developments of thought 
and activity, has not the time to read the many papers which 
would give him the needed facts. "PUBLIC OPINION" seeks to 
do this for him, and to present just what precis of life and thought 
which will enable him to quickly understand what is going on in 
the world. 

"Public Opinion" (published every Friday, Price Twopence 32 
pages), can be obtained from any Newsagent «r Bookstall, or will 
be sent post-free for one year to any address In the United King- 
dom fur ins. lOd. and to any place abroad for 13s. per annum. Or- 
ders should be addressed to 

PUBLIC OPINION, 30-3 1 Temple House, Taffis St. London E. C. 

"I know of two Prime Ministers who have read regularly PL'B- 
LIC OPINION," said the Daily News, May 15, 1907. 

"We know of at least one who has misread it," added "Punch," 
May 29, 1907. 

Specimens sent free on application. 




Southern Pacific 



Ticket- Office, Flood Building 
San Francisco 




VACATION TIME HERE 

WHERE WILL YOU SPEND IT? HOW 

WHAT WILL IT COST? 

Questions often asked 
OUR SUGGESTIONS:-- 

Shasta'and Mountain Resorts. Klamath and 
Crater Lakes. Lake Tahoe. Yosemite. Kings 
and Kern Canyons. Santa Cruz and Mountain 
Resorts. Boulder. Wrights. Laurel. Mt. 
Hermon. Glenwood. Capitola. Del Monte. 
Monterey. Pacific Grove. Paso Robles Hot 
Springs. El Pizmo. 

Hunting, Fishing, Boating, Bathing, Mountain 
Climbing, Cottage, Tent,, Camp Life, Excellent, 
Hotel Accommodations. Low summer vacation 
rates via 








rTUR 



Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast. 




VOL. LXXIV 



San Francisco, Cal., July 27, 1907 



No. 4 



The SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor, Fred- 
erick Marriott, at 905 Lincoln avenue, Alameda, California, and at 773 
Market street. San Francisco, Cal. Telephone — Alameda. 1131. San 
Francisco — Temporary 3504. 

Entered as second-class matter, May 12, 1906, at the Postoffice at Ala- 
meda, California, under the act of Congress of March 3, 1879. 

New York office — (where information may be obtained regarding sub- 
scriptions and advertising) — 206 Broadway, C. C. Murphy, representative. 
London Office — 30 Cornhill, E. C, England. George Street & Co. 

All social items, announcements, mining, commercial and financial 
news notes, advertisements or other matter intended for publication, 
in the current number of the NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA AD- 
VERTISER, should be sent to the Alameda office not later than Thurs- 
day morning. 

Of course everything has a limit. Rockefeller is 68 years 

old. 

Hold on to your Teddy bears. Tliey may save buying a 

new stock next year. 

Don't you think for a moment that Ruef has played his 

last card. He has others. 

Dr. Wiley says "pics are QO good." Not even the kind 

that mother used to make? 

Russia is very much in need of a school I" teach her 

Generals how to dodge bombs. 

Vaccination is no guard against grafting. Death or the 

penitentiary is the only remedy. 

And now comes (lie pin trust, which means thai pins will 

bend quicker than ever at the critical moment. 

It turns out thai Governor Vardaman did ool gel re- 
ligion. Calomel and sails fixed liim up. 

No, John, oratory i> no) declining— only resting. Wait 

until next year and sec it split its shirt. 

Women having husbands In support can do well in the 

hop yards of Oregon and Washington just now. 

Will Mayor Taylor please suspend all oilier business until 

lie can lind the right man EO] iln-i of Police? 

Rockefeller Bays that, old as he is. he finds much to live 

for. An income of $20,000,000 a Year, for instani i , 

— ■ — So Ear as the man himself is concerned, the Coi 
Presidential fee is do joke, but it will be later on. 

Democrats everywhere seem to like the ides of il 

Cleveland's At,torney-Qeneral, for President. Then why not? 

Pittsburg society is giving whooping-cough lawn fetes. 

M ; i \ the Lord forgive the heartless mo hers of that iniquitous 
town. 

An Ohio pen h ■One, for a month to line 

thing that will rhyme with Fairbanks. What's the matter with 
long shanks? 

A new sort of gambl been introduced in 

the ability of the train to 

stick to the rails. 

' The harder the administration goes for Harriman, the 

larger the pile of money that comes his way. The on,- is politics 
and the oilier is cash in hand. 

Don't be in a hurry. It's irly vet. h. 

quota of hue aken for di - carrying 

guns arc reported all the time. 

This is pointed, hut not personal: the many 

women keep large visiting cause they prefer visiting 

Ling and washing d 

After all. 

lemonade and ktail, only that the 

velt kind must he served in a colored e 



His spring crazy fits to write poetry should not be held 

against Mayor Taylor, so long as he tries to do the square thing 
by the city. 

'The town of O.xnard has raised saloon licenses from $600 

to $1,000 a year, which means that more water and tobacco will 
go into the stuff. 

In the spring she is a kid, later on she is a summer girl, 

later still she is engaged, and still later it's "take your infernally 
cold feet off' my legs." 

■Bryan's friends say he will have his reward in the long 

run. Perhaps, but he has been running a long time, and there 
is nothing in sight yet. 

Delmas and Honey make spectacles of themselves every- 
day. Would that they had the courage to go to the "field of 
honor," and fight it out. 

If Rockefeller told the truth when on the witness stand, 

it is clear that Ida Tarhell knows fifty times more about the 
Standard Oil Company than he does. 

What they arc trying to find out in Boise is. who is the 

champion liar and who is the champion murderer. The indica- 
tions arc that both will he located. 

The Fresno Republican, in a voice of concentrated thun- 
der, reads the Southern Pacific oul of the Republican party. 
Evidently the Republican has to pay full fare 

Of the more than 15,000,000 Voters, QOl one has f{ 

pressed a willingness to he vice-president, which means that the 
whole hog or nothing is the Yankee battle-cry. 

They say that Roosevelt is hinting to certain tattlers (in 

confidence) that he is getting to like his job mon every day. 
There is a pointer lei Taft, Cannon ami the rest 

The question is. was Colonel Smallpox after Schmitz or 

Zimmer? Perhaps it was a wag playing tricks just to see how 
they would look when puffed up from vaccine virus. 

An observing university president observes thai the b 

io keep out of trouble is by marry- 
ing. Very good, hut how about those who are already married? 

When a king invites an American humorist to a lawn 

party, the humorist should no; swell up too quickly, it may 
turn out that tin- king was curious, hut DOl otherwise inte 

if that ••inner circle" play that is now on the boards at 

an manage to keep it on . until October, Harry 

Thaw will come to the front and make ii a continuous porform- 

•liow. 

' iburg noli. -live men last 

for rM s on the side-walk. Perhaps they ba 

to Millionaire Row, and were trying to get the had taste out of 

their mouths. 

The Mikado di nies that there are strained n 

himself and the Emperor of K The 

pain of swallowing the K and all. i- 

Korea is a men ion. 

Roosevell seems to be quite a- handy with the hay fork 

as with the pen. hut did he pitch that bunch of hay with a union 
Eork or with a scab-made article? \- is important to his 
al aspirations to explain. 

man from Russ - presiding 

conference - e that Bui 'lease. 

ml see how every a - u of the nations swallows 

m Bull's dose of pills, and thanks Hod that they were 
ed. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 27, 1907. 



I&ttarutl Otommeni 



The Street Cab 
Situation. 



The day after Mayor Taylor was 
Not the Examiner's chosen by the boodling Board of 

Man. Supervisors, the Examiner began a 

bitter fight against the new execu- 
tive. The attitude of the yellow sheet was not a surprise. From 
(lie day the prosecution turned down the impudent demands of 
Willie Hearst, it was understood that his newspaper would 
launch a campaign of ridicule against any appointee. It was 
seriously announced by one of the yellow journal's staff that 
Taylor would be glad to call quits before many months had 
passed. "We'll laugh him out of office within three months," 
was the way he expressed it. echoing the expressed intention of 
his employer. Like'many of the shafts Bearst hurls against his 
adversaries, those directed againt Taylor have turned out to be 
boomerangs. For a time they caused a ripple of amusement, but 
when the malign purpose of the onslaught, became known, the 
indignation was general. Tt is stated on good authority that the 
circulation of the Examiner began to melt away like a snow 
bank in spring. The carriers put up a vigorous protest, and the 
attacks ceased. 



Hearst's Political 
( Iombinatiojt. 



Hearst quit just as soon as he real- 
ized that he was going to be out of 
pocket. His fights never last long 
when the business office is embar- 
rassed. He gave orders to stop the ridicule and set about to ac- 
complish his purpose in a round-about way. By making an alli- 
ance with Lewis F. Byington, the former District Attorney, and 
Dave Mahoney, a former Police Commissioner, he is scheming 
to get control of the local Democracy in the hope that he may 
yet traitorously build up his Independence League. Democrats 
are laughing a' the confidence with which Hearst is playing this 
bunko game. The sorrowful spectacle of three years ago when, 
with an investment of many thousands, he tried to capture the 
local Democratic primaries, is still kept in mind. Hearst is will- 
ing again to pay the bills, lint tn what an extent has not been told 
to the professional ward heelers. It is safe to assume, however, 
that he will have neither Eddie Graney or Jimmy Coffroth 
to line up the Barbary Coast opium fiends for his delegates. Both 
are now pre-occupied by the prospect of an indictment for brib- 
ing the Supervisors. During the progress of the Glass trial, 
Delmas has purposely dragged from each of the confessed bribe- 
takers that the Fight Trust was the first to hold before them the 
jingling coin. Under these circumstances, it will be imprudent 
for the prosecution tn withhold longer the indictments they have 
been so frequently promised, but which still remains smothered. 



The gentlemen who are meeting to- 
A Conclave to gether to promote universal peace 

Promote Peace. among the industrialists, the capi- 

talist and the worker, are making 
much progress in speech-making. There is nothing being done 
that is practical, however, and it is a pity that scholars, judges, 
university men, poets and politicians are really unable, although 
earnestly willing, to bring about the peace they all prate ahout. 
It is certainly an end to ho desired. It is a noble object to be 
attained. It cannot be attained without force. Some means must 
be discovered to make the Corneliuses, the McCarthys and their 
ilk obey the law of the land, and this law, this much abused law, 
must be enforced equally against the rich and the poor, and al- 
ways keeping in mind that "special privilege" should be granted 
to none. To grant special privilege means to foment anarchy 
and a general disobedience of ail law. The Schmitz administra- 
tion, from the Police Department to the Mayor's office, has been 
one long story of the granting of special privileges to the labor 
union and a few favored corporations. Crush the union as a 
political factor just as you would crush the church alliance with 
the State, and you shall have crushed the cancer-spot from which 
radiates all the microbes of anarchy. 



The Carmen's Union still holds 
meetings and denounces Calhoun, 
the man who fed and clothed them 
after the fire, as a villain. Cornelius 
and the other high-salaried officers of the union make their regu- 
lar speeches promising success. These speeches are not being 
made for home consumption. The idea is to impress the union- 
ist elsewhere in keeping up the strike benefit fund. Immense 
amounts of money find their way into the hands of the patriotic 
Mr. Bowling and the eloquent Mr. Cornelius, and if the world 
at large was assured that the strike has long ago died a natural 
death, the benefits would stop, and the chance of graft be dimin- 
ished to slim picking. It is significant of the above that when 
J. J. MePherson, a striking motorman, ventured to make a 
speech, the burden of which was that the strike was over, he 
was immediately hustled from the hall and beaten. 



A side light on the strike benefit 
Side Light on Strike, graft is given in the case of John 
Benefits. F. Duff, a striking conductor, who 

had to return to work because bis 
family, consisting of a wife and child, was starving. It is won- 
dered what the outside unions think of this state of affairs. They 
have been most liberal (Oakland carmen have I n most gener- 
ous), and yet man after man returns to the service of the com- 
pany with the story that he could not beg enough to eat from the 
local union's chiefs. Who gets the money? About $45,000. it is 
estimated, is pouring into the city every week for the purpose 
of assisting the carmen. When- is this money going? 



By the diligent study of the tele- 
Reckless Accusations, graphic despatches in the Magill 

ease, it is predicted that the accused 
will be discharged at the preliminary examination. It is now 
acknowledged that the State has no case at all, and that the 
whole accusation was made through public pressure created by 
the persistent gossip of "mauvaises langues." A district attor- 
nev who would allow himself to be swayed by the malignant ji-- 
sip of jealous neighbors docs not deserve tp hold office for one 
minute. Every evidence goes to show the Magills are innocent, 
and that a great wrong has been committed in their apprehension 
and return to Illinois in the custody of an officer. 



No one who has read the pronuncia- 
Liberty is not License, mento of Agninaldn, or who has 

made a close-range study of the ex- 
leader of the Filipinos, may not, with truth, deny him excel- 
lent qualities. Without going farther in the matter, and only 
for the purpose of illustrating a point, it is sufficient to say that 
Aguinaldo's good qualities are all overshadowed and dwarfed 
by a monumental egotism. It was this egotism that allowed him 
to plot the fearful cruelties practiced on the Artachio family, 
and to order the murder, the infamous martyrdom, of Luna. Yei 
Aguinaldo, in his saner moments, wrote eloquent diatribes on 
liberty and long articles on civic virtue. Clarence Darrow, the 
man who is attempting to defend murderer Haywood at Boise 
City, reminds me of Aguinaldo. He has all the same character- 
istics. He has the same large head, the same gestures and the 
same shifty eye. He can defend murder and crime with the Bame 
eloquence, providing the murder is committed in his favor or the 
favor of his friends, and the crime profits the particular political 
coterie or class Clarence Darrow is training with at the time. 
Darrow's "address at the Chicago County Jail" is on a par with 
the best of Aguinaldo's writings. It is. among socialists, a fam- 
ous document. It is, in reality, the most, venomous and infamous 
document ever invented by a crooked mind, and it is calculated, 
by its very eloquence, to lead to all kinds of crime ami the array- 
ing of class against class in a bitter struggle for the mastery. 
Darrow did more harm by his apparently logical defense of 
criminals, in this speech, than all the united efforts of all lovers 
of humanity in Chicago can offset in ten years. Darrow's teach- 
ings are that, liberty spells license providing that license is exer- 
cised in behalf of Darrow or Darrow's socialists, And so with 
Aguinaldo. And this is the man who is .1. ■fending murderer 
Haywood. 



July 27, 1907. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



Prize-Fighting v\i> 

THE M \MM;. 



Mayor Taylor has made one an- 
nouncement that should gain him 
the support of the decent element of 
the community. He says that he in- 
tends to put a stop to the crooked prize-fight game. "I have 
never attended a prize-fight myself," he says, "but I have no 
fault 1" find with the man who does. 1 can understand how men 
vital and alive can be attracted by an exhibition of the physical 
mastery of one man by another. It's a primary and elemental 
instinct, Personally, however, I am opposed to prize-fights be- 
cause i believe the public has no assurance that the contests 
they pay for are contests in fact. I believe there is no honesty 
in the game as it is played in and around San Francisco. I 
think no executive of a municipality has a right to decree against 
popular sport or amusement, but I do think it is the duty of the 
executive to protect the public against palpable swindles." 

Besides the excellent reasons given by the Mayor for putting 
a stop to prize-fighting, there is another consideration. The 
game of pugilism attracts a crowd of hangers-on and criminals 
who are a menace to any community. The Tenderloin is sup- 
ported largely by the ring followers, and the criminal ranks are 
constantly recruited from the same class. "Dope-fiends" and 
other degenerates of large cities increase in number as the prize- 
fight industry prospers. The same may be said of the race-track 
swindle. Mayor Taylor should give attention to the pool-selling 
that goes on all over town in cigar-stands and barber shops. There 
are few of these places that do not run a "book." 



A Splendid Statu 
Militia. 



The reports of the officers of the 
United States army to the effect that 
the State militia is in a splendid 
condition, although decimated al- 
most to a skeleton of its former self, should be gratifying to the 
public, and may be construed as a congratulation to the Adju- 
tant-! leneral and the officers of the line. Business men in general 
should encourage their clerks to fill up the regiments and to the 
end that the year 1908 will see a full complement of State troops 
at the maneuvres. The .Japanese scare lias blown over, and there 
is new nothing to fear save the riots and incipient revolutions 
ilml may be brought about by the labor unions and their follow- 
ing of idle and criminal classes. The State militia is a neces- 
sity. It is the effectual means of upholding the majesty of the 
law. 



Despite the labor unions, the strik- 
Ovekcoming Obstacles, ing carmen and the prosecution, the 

United Railroads goes right on at- 
tending to the business of giving the public the best possible 
service. Mr. Calhoun has been harassed In every direction, and 
vol I here is nol one of the innumerable cans of business that is 
neglected. The public feels the potency of the great intellect 
that is at the bead of the United Railroads. The public knows 
that the only perfect streets in San Francisco are such as have 
been pul in condition by the United Railroads. The public ac- 
knowledges lh. ii ll nlv practical system is the overhead trol- 
ley. Universal admiration, among decent people, is given the 
management for its brave front under attack. The only people 
who are blind to ib i benefits conferred by the United Railroads 
during the stressful period of reconstruction arc the striking 
ear men ami the prosecution's paid attorneys. The "Stand Pat- 
ism" of Pal Calhoun is winning out in all directions. 



It had been thought that thi 
A\ 111 vi i-i in w .ims Voain. called Anti-le 

dead. The Ubiquitous and Misin- 
formed Irving Win-low and his following, the Anti-Imperialist 
League of Boston, are all up and shouting. They want no battle- 
ship fleet in the Pacific, They argue that it would be cheaper 
the Philippines to .Japan, and get rid of a lot of trouble 
time, or to ••neutralize" the territory, same as Swit- 
i. and then give it self-government. Neither scheme is 
il. and neither is humane. To turn over the Philippines 
to the tender mercies of a Malay-Mongolian power is the 
height of cruelty. To turn over the Philippines to the tender 
self-government would be. at this time, to invite civil 
war. Why should we? What good reasons may be advanced for 
taking this - 

The people of the Philippines are happy in a larger measure 
of self-government than obtains among most of the civilized 



Governments on earth. The Philippines are now self-supporting, 
and last year paid into the treasury of the United States $G50,- 
000 in excess of expenditures. The school system is in a prosper- 
ous condition; there is no graft, and, take it all in all, the coun- 
try is feeling generally optimistic. There is a comparatively 
prosperous condition prevailing, and it is too bad should the anti- 
imperialist be allowed to interfere with his isms and nonsense, 
and bring about unrest where none exists. 



People talk of socialism, equality, 
Socialism an Old Ism. etc., as if they were new discoveries. 

Socialism had its most convincing 
trial in Sparta five centuries B. C. Disgusted with the "tyranny'' 
of the rich, a law was passed by the Yorke-Schmitz faction of 
that time commanding the rich to eat with the poor. Public 
tables were placed in the street, and everybody was forced to 
sit at one. This, of course, was "freedom," and lasted till some 
of the poor got rich, when the opulent proving too strong for the 
poor, people ate where they pleased. It is as natural for the 
pauper to envy the rich man as it is for the rich man to care not 
one brass farthing whether he be envied or not. From envy to 
hatred is a single step. Envy is the grave of emulation; the 
only way to get even with the envied is to rival him. If a 
man lacks what another has, it takes little logic to convince 
him that half is rightly his. This being the case, trying to cure 
a man of socialism before you change his nature or condition is 
as absurd as trying to make a blind man see by giving him 
powerful spectacles. Every man is sufficiently stocked with 
sophistry to justify his desires. It is a rare conscience that is not 
diluted with specious argument in its own behalf. 



The Massachusetts Board of Health 
Federal Supervision is asking the Department of Agricul- 
Milk Supply. ture at Washington to apply the Na- 

tional pure food law to the milk that 
is coming into that State from New Hampshire. 

Massachusetts is asking for protection simply because the au- 
thorities of New Hampshire are not discharging their duty or 
because the laws of Massachusetts or New Hampshire are not 
adequate to meet the requirements. Hence, the question resolves 
itself into this: Shall the Federal Government supervise the 
nation's supply? Shall we have a national dairy bureau at 
Washington to act in conjunction with the State and city bu- 
reaus and boards of health. This milk question is one of very 
grave importance to the public and as the States and cities ail 
seem to be derilect in the enforcement of the laws m this regard 
why should it not be a good idea to ask for the supervision by 
the National Government as a check on the local inspection ser- 
vice. The manufacture of preservatives should be absolutely 
prohibited and the adulteration of milk or butter should be 
punishable by terms of long imprisonment, without the alterna- 
tive of a tine. The situation locally, as far as the lacteal supply 
is concerned, demands immediate attention, as the quality degen- 
erates daily. 



Is there no way by which the bread 
Our Daily Bread. furnished the people by the bakers 

may be made subject to inspection 
and to conform to a certain standard of weight and of size. Bread 
as now sold in San Francisco has practically no weight and is so 
small in size as to encourage the use of a microscope by the con- 
suming householder in his" effort to locate the daily loaf. The 
baker should be compelled to deliver a standard size "loaf of bread 
and the price should be regulated by law. As it is. there seems 
to exist a competition between the bakers as to who shall make 
the smallest loaf. This is a serious matter and one that has, in 
the past, toppled over empires. Let us have our daily bread of a 
size that will compare favorably with the value and size of the 
coin tendered in payment. 



The plain facts are these: The Mayor and Supervisors 

held up certain public utilities men. How in the name of rea- 
son can it be said that they bribed the City Hall gang? Bribe a 
man to hold you up? What nonsci 



The mills of the gods are still grinding, and it is to be 

hoped that some of the crank-turners mav get a finger or two 
mixed up with the cogs for butting in where thev have no official 
right to be. 



6 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 27, 1907. 



Coastal Steameb 
Accidents. 



The investigation into the recent 
collision off the Mendocino coast of 
the steamer Sonoma and the 
schooner Advent, resulted as usual — 
the exposure of crass stupidity on the part of the people in 
charge of the boats. The captains of both vessels had given 
strict orders that if a craft was sighted within a mile they were 
to be called. The second mate was in charge of the Advent, 
while the third mate was on the deck of the Sonoma. The ves- 
sels were in sight of either for nearly half an hour before the 
collision took place, yet neither mate called his captain until 
the vessels were almost together. The collision took place before 
the master of the Sonoma could reach the deck. The Advent, 
being a sailing vessel, had the right of way, and kept on her 
course, as was proper. The mate of the Sonoma offered no ex- 
cuse for running on a clear night into a vessel that lie had been 
observing for nearly half an hour. Luckily, there were no lives 
lost in the collision, but that was not the fault of the mates. 
Every passenger on a coastwise boat puts his life into the hands 
of such incompetents, who have managed to secure licenses. The 
examination through which these men have to go is not severe 
enough. Besides being examined as to seamanship, general in- 
telligence should be taken into consideration. A man may be a 
fairly good navigator, yet have no executive ability, or lose hi3 
head altogether in a crisis. A rattled officer on a boat is worse 
than none at all. 



Some time ago the News Letter 
The Columbia Horror, called attention to the fact thai lie 

steamer captains operating coast- 
wise vessels were guilty of hugging the coast too closely, and of 
neglecting to keep proper watch for steamers coming in an op- 
posite direction. The San Pedro's collision with the Columbia 
is an inexcusable affair. From all the accounts of survivors and 
passengers the San Pedro was evidently running much too fast 
and was thought by some to be entirely off her course. The 
Columbia was too near the shore for comfort. The custom of 
sailing and steaming within sight of a long shore line, practiced 
by the captains plying vessels between San Francisco and North- 
ern ports renders the route the same as the precarious traveling 
of a narrow stream, and accidents must result. 



The shooting and the riots in the 
Menace of Anarchy. Mission district may be accounted 

as the direct outcome of the un- 
punished minor rioting of the previous week. The Mission has 
been in a state of insurrection for a long time, and the News Let- 
ter has again and again pointed out this fact, which every other 
journal seems willing to ignore. If there is any desire to pro- 
mote tree intercourse in commoreo. freedom in the pursuit of 
happiness, or a living, on the part of .Mayor Taylor, he will pro- 
ceed at once to give all possible protection to the United Rail- 
roads or any other corporation, citizen or group of citizen.-, who 
desire to do business in the .Mission or any other par) of Sail 
Francisco. If it is not possible for Mr.' Taylor to give the 
proper police protection to the decent people in the Mission, 
then let him apply to the Suite authorities for troops and de- 
clare thai pari of our city under martial law. It is high time 
the hoodlums who have so long terrorized the Mission district 
be disciplined, and if policemen's clubs are not available, then 
let it be the guns of the militia. 



There are indications that at last a 
San Francisco's Great movement is well under way to pro- 
IIarbor. ride adequate harbor facilities for 

San Francisco. The task i- a stu- 
pendous one, and thirty or forty million dollars will be needed 

to carry out tlie schemes for improvement. The main reas 01 

this vast expenditure is that the needs of our harbor have been 
neglected for nearly a generation. Improvements have been 
made, but they have not been in proportion to the growing im- 
portance of the city or to the increase in the business done here. 
Now we will have to not only provide for future needs, but to 
pay for past neglect. 

The Joint Legislative Commission that has been inquiring 
into the needs of the harbor held its first business meeting lail 
week. At this meeting the members expressed themselves as 
unanimously in favor of recommending that the State vote the 
issuance of bonds for immense sums to provide adequate facili- 



ties for the handling of the commerce of this port during the 
next fifty or seventy-five years. It is proposed that this bond is- 
sue be not only for the enlargement and upbuilding of wharves, 
piers and seawalls, but that warehouses, spur tracks, and huge 
cranes for the hoisting of freight into steamboats be included. 

Plans were submitted by Colonel W. H. Heuer, who has been 
making a thorough survey of water-front needs. The length of 
the water front, according to Colonel Heuer's figures, is ten 
miles. In this distance must be constructed approximately 150 
piers 100 feet wide, and from 600 to .800 feet long, with slips 
between them 200 feet wide. The ferry building, Colonel Heuer 
says, is too small, and to accommodate future traffic should be 
made twice its present size. 

The plans made by the Commission include improvements in 
all the coast harbors, and on the Oakland as well as the San 
Francisco water front. As was remarked by President Stafford. 
of the Harbor Commission : "If the Pacific Ocean continues to 
grow in international importance as present conditions warrant 
the belief, the harbor of San Francisco will become the leading 
port of the world, and in a short time the water front of San 
Francisco and Oakland will be regarded as one port." 

The Commission has another very 
Reduction of Excessive important matter under considera- 
< iiauges. tion, and that is the reduction of 

port charges. Too heavy a tax has 
been put upon ships entering this harbor. These charges fall 
upon the importer, and he in turn has to shift them to his cus- 
tomers. He is at a disadvantage in competition with importers 
of other coa.-i cities, who, receiving their goods more cheaply 
than he. can underbid him for country trade. Port charges 
should be made so low that ships would come here in preference 
to entering other coast ports. 



The case against Louis Glass is as 
A Very WEAK CASE, weak as dish-water, and the jury 

will undoubtedly render a verdict of 
not guilty or come to some disagreement. In cither case a vast 
amount of time and money will have been wasted, and the com- 
munity kept in a turmoil and in unrest for months to achieve 
a negative result. It is a pity that the insensate chase after re- 
venge and notoriety should have prompted Spreckels and Lang- 
don to the paralyzing of the telephone service. It is suspected 
that the girls out on strike are being furnished with funds by 
emissaries of these two gentlemen statesmen and patriots. 



Calhoun's new men are winning 
Calhoun and his Xi u praise in every direction for their 
Men. splendid behavior. They are as effi- 

cient and as polite a lot of operatives 
as have ever I □ gathered together under the banner of any pub- 
lic or quasi-public corporation. They are a brave and patient lot. 
and their patience has been sorely tried in the last. week. They 
have been assailed by strikers and their hoodlum friends, and 
shot, some of them dangerously; some of them have been crip- 



* 




CHAS KEILUS& CO 
HIGH GRADE CLOTH I ERS 



No Branch Stores. No AgeoU. 

As usual, we are the first to show models and fabrics for fall and winte r 
1907-8. It is not necessary for us to use extravagant oratory to praise 
our collection. Be assured it's exclusive containing special ideas of 
advanced fashioners. 

We declare without hesitancy in all our business experience we have never been able to 
procure such characteristic clothes of marked higb degree, as this season. Even top-notch 
drapers of repute must acknowledge their superiority in this scientific gam* of ' 'clothes pro- 
gression." Moil tailors are positively "lost in the shuffle." 



KIjNG SOLOMON'S HALL, 

Fillmore Street, near Sutter, San Francisco 



July 27, 1907. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



pled, one man had his head pounded almosl into a pulp, and in 
a | every instance it has been a case of sixty or Beventy to 
one. The San Francisco hoodlum ear striker is a coward. He 
is likewise a liar, and Cornelius is the champion. 



There has been considerable anxiety 
School Department. among the school teachers (his week. 

The school hoard members, the 
superintendents of high and grammar schools, are in a ferment 
of anxiety regarding developments. They fear the Grand Jury. 
There is more than a chance that that body will lend an ear to 
the many charges floating about regarding the purchases of 
desks, books and other school paraphernalia. A good Grand 
Jury shake-up of the school system would be a patriotic and 
beneficent act. 



The New Broom. 



The new broom in the hands of the 
new Mayor is making herculean ef- 
forts to sweep clean. The Mayor is 
the incentive to the broom, however, and the public is quickly 
seeing that the News Letter's prediction was correct. The Mayor 
is nobody's puppet. He is making his selection of officials on the 
principle of men and not parties. He seems to be guided by 
common sense. And the most refreshing of all the new Mayor's 
qualifications is his very apparent desire to be fair, and, at the 
same time firm, with the labor element. There will be no cring- 
ing and no taking off of the hat to the laborites by this executive. 
He will deal justly by them, but let them infringe the law and 
indulge in their pet sport of rioting, as they did Friday, Satur- 
day and Sunday in the Mission, and the "poet" will show the 
Examiner and its hoodlum cohorts the scourge of the law. 



A New Chief op 
Police. 



Mayor Taylor should take advan- 
take of the plea made by the attor- 
neys for the defense of Dinan and 
dismiss him from his office. He 
should then appoint a man to his place who is beyond the reach 
of the tenderloin's influence. 

Bingham, the chief of police for New York, is fulfilling the 
promise made in his appointment. He is an ex-army officer, 
and the New York department of police has been much improved 
by the appointee. General Wtoodrufl, or Colonel Wilhelm, have 
been mentioned for the place in San Francisco. Either of these 
gentlemen, providing they could be induced to accept the posi- 
tion, would be acceptable to the public and would be sure to do 
his full duty toward the entire people. San Francisco has been 
laboring under the delusion that it takes a thief or a friend of 
thieves to catch a thief. Thai theory was born of pessimism, lt 
must have been the emanation of a bent and contorted intellect. 
At any rate, San Francisco, by its experience with Dinan, has 
proven conclusively that the friend ami familiar of pick-p 
and thieves ia not a monumental success in the art of thiei 
catching. 



Poison inc. the 
Innocents. 



The poisoning of the innocents still 

hi all unhindered in San Fran- 

cisco, and the inspection of the 

milk supply is carried on in the 

same lax manner as in days cone by. San Francisco is not alone 

remise in tins particular, bul all around the hay the same lax 

discipline is being observed by the powers that govern. The 

milk that is being delivered lo the families of San PrSJ 

is of a qualih 90 pen- that it smells to heaven. It would be in- 
teresting reading for the public to know the inside story of the 
milk co in, as made between Abe Ruef and the Dairy- 

I ttion and the 'Milk Drivers' Association. The dealers in 

ratives might make interesting revelations as to how and 

when ami why they, too. wore held up. That, however, is ancient 

Grand Jury may not lie up to par when i; 
to an examination into the methods of the purveyors of the lac- 
teal fluid. It may he that there are reasons why Mr. Langdon 
and Mr. Spreckels should not tread the milky way. 



When the season is at hand for the summer vacation, the 

busy house-wife puts her house in order. The best way to da 

■ilist the services of the Spaulding Carpet Cleaning 

lolden 1 late avenue. Promptness and thorough- 

e the qualifications that have given this firm its splendid 

reputation. Don't forget the number. 




THE LECIONS OF 

CAESAR. 

were not nearly so numerous 
as the vast multitude who 
daily fortify and comfort the 
"Inner Man" with a "wee 
nippie" of 

HUNTER 
RYE 

The 

American Gentleman's 

Whiskey 

CHARLES M. REYNOLDS CO. 

Agents for California and Nevada. 

912-914 Folsom St.. San Francisco. Cat. 



Remember that Schmitz was made Mayor of the class 

system. That is to say, labor unions assumed to divide the voters 
into classes, and roted !'<>r him as ,1 class by itelf, and in opposi- 
tion to all other classes. In other word-, labor unionism it 

Schmitzism. 



Ten days in jail for robbing's!) orchard of five oranges 

is the price in some pari oi Southern California, but congratula- 
tions from all Christian nations ia the penalty for stealing a 
whole empire over in the Far I 



r 



A Message for You 



■N 



This bank pays 4 per cent on 
Savings Deposits. A few hundred 
dollars to your credit here will 
prove a source of strength to you 
in case of necessity. Think this 
over. One dollar will start an ac- 
count with this bank. 



California Safe Deposit and Trust 
Company 



\* 



CALIFORNIA AND MONTGOMERY STS. 

We*t End Branch-- 1 511 Dertsadero St. 

Mission Branch— 2572 Mission St. near 22nd. 

Cp-Town Branch — 1740 Fillmore St. near Softer. 
Potraro Branch— 19th and Minnesota. 



J 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 27, 1907. 



MORE NAVAL STATIONS AND DOCKS. 

At present the most northerly base of the United States navy 
is the coaling station on the Aleutian Islands, off the coast of 
Alaska. This is the most westerly end of the American territory 
of the United States, and is not Ear distant from the ports of 
Siberia and Northern Japan. The most northerly navy yard ; s 
at Bremerton, Washington, on Puget Sound. This is a well- 
equipped yard, with facilities lor docking and repairing large 

vessels. The Bremerton naval station will he developed to i t 

the greater requirements of the situation. 

The facilities of San Francisco for accommodating large war- 
ships have been examined carefully and will he improved. Naval 
officers are supervising the construction at Hunter's Point of 
two large drydocks capable of admitting vessels id' great draft. 
There is. of course, a iarge navy-yard at Mare Island, and San 
Diego has for a long time been a rendezvous and coaling station. 
Plans for a fully-equipped naval station at San Diego have been 
prepared. A eoaling station will be established at Panama, and 
negotiations are in progress with Mexico to secure a footing at 
Magdalena Bay in Lower California. The acquisition of Mag- 
dalena Pay was strongly recommended by Rear-Admiral C. K. 
Goodrich, when he was in command of the Pacific squadron, and 
his report was approved by the general board, the Secretary of 
tin' Navy and the President. Though the law of Mexico pro- 
hibits the alienation of national soil for any purpose, it is be- 
lieved that Mexico will realize that no attempt is being made to 
encroach upon her territory, and will be willing to supply the 
United Stntos with a naval station within easy reach of the 
Panama Canal. It will he urged that the American fleet would 
protect Mexico from foreign attack. 

Even if Magdalena Kay should he acquired, it is so distant 
from centers of population and so ill-supplied with fresh water 
that no attempt would be made to establish a navy-yard there. 
The navy-yard will be at San Diego, which is within easy reach, 
and Magdalena Bay will lie used as a winter rendezvous for tar- 
get practice. The hay has been surveyed accurately by the United 
States Coast Survey, ami is saiii by naval officers (o be the finest 
naval practice ground in the world. 

The entrance to the bay is one and one-half miles wide, with 
deep water on the bar even at low tide. The bay is fifteen miles 
lone ; 1 1 1 . i ten miles wide, with a depth of 120 feet in many 
places. Another land-locked harbor joins Magdalena Bay, and 
the United States wishes to acquire this also. If Mexico con- 
sents to cede Magdalena l',a\ to I lie United Stales it will be 

made the naval outpost of the Pacific end of the Panama Canal. 



ENNEN'S 



*C. BO RATED 
O TALCUM 



WARSHIPS WILL BRING BUSINESS. 

The presence of a Beet of seventeen warships on the Pacific 
Coast will be highly profitable to San Francisco. It i> expected 
that the Heel will remain in Pacific waters tor three years at 

least, and during all this time will require provisions and fuel. 

Some of these »ill be purchased while the ships arc in Oriental 

waters, but the greater part will be boughl IV San Francisco 

merchants. The fleet will he manned by about one thousand 

commissioned and petty officers, with eight thousand men under 
their command. The pay of these officers ami men will amount 
to about four million dollars a year, and much of this will In 
spent in San Francisco. Ii i- estimated that the average ex- 
penditure of each warship daily is two thousand dollars, so that 
seventeen warships will spend $34,000 daily. 

At present, only six hundred cadets are at the naval training 
station on Verba Buena, or Coal Island, but the torpedo station 
there is to I nlarged, and arrangements are to be made to in- 
struct two thousand cadets. The presence of a large licet of 
warships on lids Coast will, no doubt, stimulate the desire of 
many youths to enter the navy. Cadets from the Middle West- 
ern States who have hitherto been sent to training schools in 
the Mast, will in future receive instruction at the Coal [gland 
school. 




N&WDER 



-^ s r '«yel§ii^ 

PRICKLY HEAT, 
CHAFING, ana 
SUNBURN, SJ%)ftK uc ™ > " > 



GERHARD MBNNEN CO. N.w.,1: N I 



Fabric 



Cretonnes 

Rugs and Carpets 

Wall Paper 



TAYLOR-SINCLAIR. CO. 

Bush at. Van Ness 



$1.50 Books for 50c. 

We have just received several hundred differ- 
ent titles of late copyright fiction ordinarily sold 
at from #1.08 to #1.50. We have placed them 
on sale during the month of July at 50c each. 

Among the titles are: 

THE GREEN FLAG. Con™ Doyle 

STRANGE SECRETS. Conan Doyle 

TRAFFIC, Thurston 

CRIMSON CRYPTOGRAM, Tracy 

MTSTBRIOCS MR. SABIN, Oppeoheim 

CAPTAIN JACKMAN, Clark Russell 

WARD OF THE KING. Macqootd 

HOUSE WITH THE GREEN SIHTTERS.Gr.cn 

NEW GRUB STREET. Gis.lnd 

BLAKE'S BOOK STORE 
646 Van Ness Ave. Near Turk Street 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Central Trust Company of California. 

For the half year ending June 30, 1907. a dividend has been declared on 
deposits in the savings department of this bank as follows: On term de- 
posits at the rate of four (4) per cent per annum, and on ordinary de- 
posits at the rate of three and three-quarters (3 3-4) per cent per annum, 
payable on and after Monday. July 1, 1907. Dividends not called for are 
added to and bear the same rate of interest as the principal from July 
1, 1907. B. G. TOGNAZZI, Manager. 

Office — 42 Montgomery street, corner Sutter, San Francisco. 



Something New 



The Sultan Turkish Baths 



Post St., between Taylor and Jones 



Entire 7 story 
class cA fire- 
proof building 
devoted to the 
luxuries of men 



July 27, 1907. 



AND CALIFOBNIA ADVERTISER. 



PLEASURES 
WAND 



'"Weber &o -mod but P/e&surdr 





M1NDI0I.I, llliUYFUS KINGSTON LT THE OEPHEUM NEXT WEEK. 

* * * 

If you -want to laugh harder than you have done before in 
many yearSj hear Ezra Kendall, the monologist and humorist, 
in his happiest vein. y<m must go to the Van Ness Theatre dur- 
ing the coming week, where Mr. Kendall is appearing in his 
fhroe-aH comedy, "Swell Elegant Jones." There is laughter 
, mil pleasure in nearlj every moment of the performance. The 
show gives one an idea of Kendall's ability as a comedian, but i1 
is not a vehicle that is remarkable for its consistency, and the 

last act is stupid. Tiler,, is this to he said ill its favor, hnwo\er. 

ii is scoring an undoubted popular success. 

The next attraction at the Van Ness Theatre will he The 
Prince Chap," one of the greatest comedy successes seen in New 

York in many seasons, so the report runs, with Cyril Si 

In- original star role, 'ldie plav was written by Edward Peple, 
ami produced at the Madison Square Theatre in the metropolis. 
lis success was so great that the day after it- firs! performance 
tickets were placed on sale for the balance of the engagement 
to oilier bookings at the Madison Square, the comedy 
an to Weber's Theatre on Broadway, where iis run was 
-fully continued for oveT 809 tin-. Ii was afterwards 
i'd at the Yorkville, Lincoln Square ami Majestic Thea- 
all within eighteen mon I - -. "Hie Prince 

Chap" was played 150 times at St Charles Wyndham's Criter- 
ion Theatre. London, and is now running in the English prov- 

* * * 

The hill for the week ai the Orpheum, beginning Sunday 

matinee, is a tine one. It is headed '■"• the Foremost come< 

try. Frank Seymour and Emma Hill, who will 
■it. "'Idle Mix and : wdiieh it is 



predicted will prove a delightful surprise. John W. World, a 
singing and dancing comedian, and Minded Dreyfus Kingston, 
the favorite soubrette "with the grand opera voice," will re- 
appear after quite a long absence, and are sure of a cordial 
greeting. Other newcomers will be the Five Musical Byrons, 
who perforin on a variety of instruments with a skill that 
has made them famous. It will be the second week of the Stun- 
ning Grenadiers, who have created quite a sensation, and the 
last week of Gaston and Green, Roberts, Hayes & Roberts, Les 
Jardy, and of those delightful artists, James Neill and Edythe 
(Jhapman Neill. Mr. and Mrs. Neill will say adieu to us in a 
new one-act play by Edgar Allen Woolf, called "The Actress 
and the Devil." Mrs. Neill will appear as the actress, and Mr. 
Neill will play "The Devil of Wall Street," a character study, 
and verv much out of the conventional. 



At the New Alcazar Theatre this coming week, C. Haddon 
Chambers* society drama, "The Idler," will be produced. It has 
an English setting, but a decidedly American atmosphere. In 
the late seventies, Mark Cross, John Harding and twin brothers 
named Strong are working as prospectors in Golden Valley in 
California. There they are of the rough and ready set, and 
quarrels are numerous. In one of these, John Harding shoots 
and kills the twin brother of Simon Strong, without giving him 
any opportunity to defend himself. Then Mark Cross and Simon 
Strong swear vengeance. 

Years later, John Harding falls heir to a baronetcy. He is 
elected to Parliament, ancl becomes an eminently respected citi- 
zen. The only one of his old associates whom he meets is Cross, 
who returns from the mines to England to forget, an unhappy 
marriage. There he falls in love with a Miss Mierryweatner, 
and desiring to marry her, he seeks a method of breaking off 
with his wife. He leaves London for Vienna, when she is re- 
ported ill, and he remains with her six months until she die-; 
then he returns to London intending to marry the girl he loves. 
In the meantime. Miss Merryweather falls in love with and 
marries John Harding. While Mark Cross abhors the man who 
has supplanted him in the lady's affections, his love for the girl 
keeps him from telling of Harding's past. Then Simon Strong 
appears on the scene, recognizes Harding and swears that lie will 
tiring him to justice. Cross has at one linn 1 Baved Strong's life, 
and at the price of this secures a letter from him exonerating 
Harding of the deed. Cross's worst nature asserts itself, and 
he endeavors to make Lady Harding pay the price of her hus- 
band's liberty with her honor. In this he Fails, in ae much as 
Strong falls in love with Lady Harding'- sister. Mi. Kelcey 
will play the role of Mark Cross and Mi-- Shannon that of Lad} 
Harding. 

* * * 

"The Lion and the Mouse" ami a big production of "The 
Prince of Pilsen" air two i 
be offered i he i online an i i he \ an Ness Theatre. 



aiuHnlbuiin 




The singing and sustaining qualities of the Baldwin are incom- 
parable. 

aA careful investigation and comparison will prove to you con- 
clusively that no other piano has these highest qualities, so well 
exemplified. From manufacturers direct to you. 
D. H. BALDWIN &. CO., 1569 Van Ness Ave.. Cor. California 



30 



SAN FBANCISCO NEWS LETTEE 



July 27, 1907. 



.4 CYNICAL BAT. 
A spider built her lonely home 
In the loftiest nook of a lofty room. 
But why did she weep at the close of day? 
Some hand had swept that home away. 
She wove it then o'er the broken pane; 
'Twas beaten down by the wind and rain. 

Then she crept into the dark old hall, 
And spun her lines from wall to wall. 
The I ' i!r vrheel'd by with drowsy song, 
And bore on his wings those lines along. 

But who art thou with dusty wing, 

Str;mge, mysterious, restless thing? 

Where dwellest thou, and what dost thou search? 

"I'm at bat," it shrieked. "I dwell in the church, 

Where, 'from morn till dewy eve,' I swing 

By the hook you see on either wing. 

I heard thy wail, and have come to tell 

Where thou may'st aye securely dwell, 

Where hand nor beetle, wind nor rain, 

Can e"er molest thy home again. 

It shall stand secure as if built on the rocks — 

'Tis the hole in the lid of ihe charity box!" 

■ — Exchange. 



Public intereei has entirely, with some interest, waned in 

the matter of the notorious George D. Collins, yet, although at 
last unmistakably despondent. Collins makes his regular ap- 
pearances in Judge Lawlor's court in his efforts to prolong the 
procedure connected with his appeal. This apathy of the public 
is probably just what Collins wants at the present time. As 
long as he was in the public eye. as he was for two years, there 
was little chance of his rpal crime being forgotten. Now, with 
the District Attorney's office inordinately busy with other weight- 
ier matters than sending Collins to the penitentiary, there is a 
possibility of his prosecution becoming less vigorous than before. 
With his marvelous skill and craftiness as a technical, resource- 
ful lawyer. Collins has so tangled up his case and introduced 
so many unusual compliances into it that it is even yet possible 
for the United States Supreme Court to reverse the findings 
of the local courts, on strict technicalities alone. Collins has 
been regularly demanding an immediate hearing on his appeal, 
but the District Attorney is as regularly asking and receiving 
continuances. It will be interesting to know if Collins will ever 
e inside of San Qncntin. 



There is some previous talk about "lynching MagiU for 

wife murder." People are ?low to understand that a suspected 
innocent, man is as innocent as an unsuspected innocent man. 
Some years ago there was a man in Lake County whom every- 
body wanted to hang because his family disappeared surrepti- 
tiously. But they returned. Mrs. Magi]] is dead, but she may 
not have been murdered. Sudden death seems to stir up everv- 
body to suspicion nod accusation. And the average man eon- 
siders his suspicion as an inspiration. If every widower is io 
be hanged whose first wife's permanent departure was precipi- 
tate; second marriage offers some discouraging features. Magil] 
is on his way home to face his accusers. Perhaps the lady was 
not poisoned; perhaps, if she was. he didn't poison her. Much 
weight is laid on the fact that he married four months after her 
death. Don't people get divorced and re-marry the same day? 
What is death in married life but permanent divorce. A man 
may be informal and laugh at the conventionalities without be- 
ing a murderer. 



For a man who has been caught in the act so many times, 

Harriman seems to enjoy life pretty well. But you see, he car- 
ries an immunity mill of his own. 

THE LITTLE PALACE HOTEL. 
The musical programme that is rendered at the Palace is one 
of the many attractions of this most popular hotel. 



- — Mrs. WInslow's Soothing Syrup for children's teething la guaranteed 
under the Food and Drug Act, Serial No. 1098. suo.iiuii.eeu 



— r A 'JJji nds of interior repair work and furniture made to order s 
usual. UNITED CRAFTS AND ARTS, 147 Presidio avenue 



If Cornelius is such a lover of peace, why doesn't this 

apostle of concord have something to say about the attack on that 
motorman some nights since? His friends were caught red- 
handed in an attempt to murder. What resolutions condemning 
the crime have been adopted by the Carmen's Union. But let 
that go ! The people of this city are tired of strikes, especially 
ear strikes, more especially this car strike. I am certain we have 
seen our last. I believe even Cornelius's be-fooled followers are 
beginning to think. It will take an able man to bamboozle these 
hungry fools into another tie-up. To Mr. Calhoun the thanks 
of all respectable people are due. He will never recognize the 
union, and as to his giving in, I believe, like John Paul Jones, 
when asked if he surrendered, he hadn't begun to fight. What- 
ever faults Mr. Calhoun has, he has the virtue of sticking — of 
"standing Pat." The strike is virtually ended, and upon the 
collapse of the union, none will be happier than a large percent- 
age of its members. San Francisco has run the gamut of every 
trouble. Let us have peace. 



Townsend's California Glace Fruits. 

Van Ness avenue. 

New Alcazar Theatre 

ABSOLUTELY "CLASS A" BUILDING. 



New Store, 1144 



COR. SUTTER AND 

STEINER STS 
Tel. West 603. 



BELASCO & MAYER, Owners and Managers. 

Commoncint Hondny July 29th. 

Twentieth week of the New Alcazar Stock Company prcienting 

MR. HERBERT KELCEY AND MISS EFFIE SHANNON 



In C H addon Chamber' 



iety drama 

THE IDLER 



Prices — Evening, 25c. to $1; matinees, Saturday and Sunday, 
25c. to 50c. 

Next- -Sherlock Holmes 
Coming — Denis' 0' Sullivan 



Orpheum 



ELLIS ST,. NEAR FILLMORE. 



Week beginning thl» Sunday afternoon. July 2Slh Matinee every day. 

REFULGENT VAUDEVILLE 

Seymour and Hill: World and Kingston: Five Musical Byron-; Second week of The St) n 

Gronndiers; Roberta. Hnycs and Roberta; Gaston and Brecn; Leu Jnrdy; New Orpheum Motion 
Pictures: Last Week and Brill. nut StUOMI "f James Neill and Edytho Chapmnn IfeJH, i 
for the first time Edgar Allen Woolf'sono net play. "The Actress and the Devil." 

Prices— Evenings, 10c, 25c. 60c, 75c. Box seats, $1. 
Matinees (except Sundays and Holidays), 10c, 25c. 50c. 
Phone, West 6000. 



Van Ness Theatre 



CORNER VAN NESS AVE. 



OOTTLOB. MARX A CO..Propt. and Mirri. 
Tonight. Sunday night and all next week 
Matinee Saturday only. 

EZRA KENDALL 

in the tercet Fun shew 



AND GROVE STREET 

Phone Market 500 



"SWELL ELEGANT JONES 



Scale Uc to |1.50 
Ahr: Mh-Cjjtl Scott , 



"The Prince Chap." 



A DAY AND BOARDING SCHOOL FOR BOYS 
MILITARY 

ACADEMY 



RUGBY 



CAVALRY Opens August, 15, 1907 

Ward, Ellsworth, Derby and Fulton Streets, 
BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA 

For lull information and catalog address the commandant 



IN ALAMEDA 

For Sale or to Lease 

8 Room Cottage, Furnished or Unfurnished; 
Pretty Garden. 

2251 Clinton Ave 

Between Oak and Walnut. Open for inspection 
between 10 a. m. and 1 p. m. Or for informa- 
tion address F. A. Marriott, 773 Market St.,S.F. 



ANNUAL MEETING 

The Risdon Iron and Locomotive Works 

Thoannrta) meeting of the stockholder* of the Ilitdnn Iron and Locomotive Work*, fur lh« eJootlon ol 
trustees for tho ensuing year and the- transaction of such other business as limy be brought bafOl** the 
meeting, will be held at the office of the company. No. 208 Stcuart St.. San Francisco, on MGNHA\ , il,.- Itb 
day of August, 1007. at 11 o'clock a. m. 

AUGUSTUS TAYLOR. Secretary 



JriY 27, 1907. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



11 



BATTLESHIPS FOR TEE PACIFIC COAST. 

1 1 is expected that Rear-Admiral Robley D. Evans, when he 
starts from the Atlantic in command of the fleet for the 
Coast, will have with him sixteen battleships and an equal num- 
ber of colliers. The colliers will accompany the fleet or be sen! 
ahead of it, as may be round most convenient. The flee! will 
probably steam in two divisions, at an interval of a day or two, 
bo as to render the task of coaling easier. The ports of call 
will probably be Port Castries. Santa Lucia, L800 miles from 
New York; Rio Janeiro, 300 miles; Sandy Point. 2,200 miles; 
('alias. 2,600 miles; Acapulco, 3,200 miles; thence In San Fran- 
cisco, L800 miles. On reaching the Pacific Coast, the fleet will 
be joined by Hie battleship Nebraska, which is nearly ready to 
lake her crew on heard. The repairs on the battleships Oregon 
and Wisconsin, which are now at Bremerton Navy Yard, will 
probably be finished by March of next year, so that they can be 
added to the fleet, which will then consist of nineteen battle- 
ships. 

The armored cruisers Washington and Tennessee, which are 
now in French waters, have been ordered to refit at once and join 
the second armored cruiser squadron on the Pacific Coast. The 
other vessels in this squadron are the California and South 
Dakota, both of which are nearly ready. The Tennessee will lie 
the flagship of Rear-Admiral Charles H. Stockton. The first 
armored cruiser squadron consists of the West Virginia, Colo- 
rado, Maryland and Pennsylvania, which are now at Chefoo in 
China, but which will be ordered to San Francisco, which port 
they expect to reach before the battleships arrive. 

Piosides the battleship fleet and the armored cruiser squadron, 
their is a protected cruiser squadron, which is made up of the 
Charleston, Chicago, Milwaukee and St. Louis, with the gunboat 
Yorktown. 

Naval officers say that the fleet ought to be sent to the Philip- 
pine Islands, hut that the lack of docking and repairing facilities 
there render this impossible. The equipment for the reception 
of so large a fleet on the Pacific Coast is inadequate, hut another 
navy yard and additional dry-docks will be provided. The re- 
pairing and docking facilities of the Hawaiian Islands will also 
he improved. 



TOBACCO CAN BE GROWN IX HAWAII. 
Tobacco has been grown in Hawaii by the natives of the islands 

fur nearly a century, hut it is of such poor quality thai it has no 
commercial value. Dr. .fared G. Smith, director of the I 

Stall's experiment station in Hawaii, says thai the inferior qual- 
ity is to be attributed to the Eact that the seed of the home- 
grown tobacco has I n used year aftei jrear withoui change or 

selection. He says thai tobacco raised from picked a I, even 

H "M " ba received no i oi much higher quality 

than the native-grown article. When carefully cul 

Cured, the Hawaiian to i. 1 1 

[act. I Ir. Smith asserts I ha 

be grown in Hawaii, eithe dei cover or in the open air. in 

quantities to rendi op. The experiments 

made h&\ e been on n sufficient scale to aft i 
Tobai i o-i ulture, bowevei , should no I without 

adequate to provide the proper equipm 

Dr. Smith believes thai the id in Hawaii suitable 

id that the industry may attain an import- 
id only to the production of Bug 



Cornelius reminds me of a man repeating bis statement 

in a loud tone because his word is qu If we know any- 

thing, we knew ear , ncreasing. All the' 

earth cannot convince those that ride that all those that 
are walking. Cutting a "picket 53 on each corner to 
the ears would be assinine if it were net the work of V: 
men's anion. \s it is. we must clas irmal. W 

the normal conduct of A I . . le level 

of tlie iehavior of the animal 

for th the publii boun is 

not, he would 

clique 

- 



FESTIVE MARY KELLY. 

\\.\r\ Kelly, the notorious refugee who has been raising trou- 
i -inee the big lire, is iiou iii ilie head of the movement in 
the expulsion of refugees from the public parks of San 
Francisco on August 17th. She says that injunction proceedings 
will he brought, and thai (he case will In- carried to the highest 
courts in the land. The main argument that the refugees use 
against being compelled to move is that the Hotel St. Francis is 
I to occupy a public square. The average refugee lacks 
the brains necessary to realize that the presence of the hotel in 
Union Square is an attractive feature of the town; that it is a 
public utility, and moreover that it is not a hotbed of crime and 
degeneration. The ones who will be benefited by the removal 
of the refugees are the refugees themselves, if only they could 
realize it. In the year and a half that they have been occupying 
public parks they have been constantly growing more dependent 
on outside help. Moreover, these refugee camps have attracted 
people who will not look out for themselves if they can shift their 
burdens to some one else. The majority of them are profes- 
sional spongers. There is even less excuse for refugee camps 
now than there was before the fire. Times are better than they 
were prior to April, 1906, and money is more plentiful. To be 
sure, there are in the camps some helpless people who were de- 
prived by the fire of everything they had, and who are too old 
to make a new start in life. There is no intention of throwing 
these people out to shift for themselves. The movement is 
directed against the strong and able, who would never pay rent 
as long as the city provides a home for them. The more such 
people gain by not paying rent, the worse they are off, for they 
have that much additional to spend for liquor. 



— — Private Secretary Loeb denies that he has hopes that he 
may be the dark horse next year. Tic has no presidential aspira- 
tions; besides, he would noi, like to stand in the way of Roose- 
velt or Taft or Cannon — all friends of his. 



-Swain's Bakery, at 1111-1113 Post street, is the rendez- 



J 3 — , ..... .-. 

vous of the elite. The shopping hour finds it crowded with San 
Francisco's fair sex. h is the gentleman's luncheon place. 
Sehlitz and Wurtzburger beer on draught. 




In order to make room for new goods 
^> now arriving we are holding an 



Odds and Ends 
Sale 

odd lots of Dining Chairs, Lace Nets 
Draperies, Carpets, Serving Tables, Iror 
Beds, etc., at half regular price 



Monday and 
Tuesday only 




Ellis Street,, between Polk and Van Ness 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 27, 1907. 




ANITE 



L-^^^m*-.. 



The railroad line between Oakland and Suisun carries a great 
amount of travel, seventy-five trains running over it daily. It 
is the principal outlet to Sacramento and the Eastern States. 
Between Benicia and Suisun, the tracks pass over marshes, and 
during the winter are often under water. The train- during the 
rainy season frequently have to go down the San Joaquin Valley 
to avoid this marshy region. Between Cygnus and Teal is a 
spot known by the ominous name of the "bottomless pit." For 
years, material has been emptied into this sink, but each winter 
the tracks sink, and the route has to be given up for a time. 
It is now the intention of the railroad engineers to abandon the 
marshes and build the track on the solid ground between Val- 
lejo and Cordelia. Trains will be carried by water from Bodeo 
to South Vallejo instead of across Carquinez Straits from Port 
Costa to Benicia. where the distance from shore to shore is 
shortest. The trip from Rodeo to South Vallejo will be a much 
longer one but will obviate the necessity of crossing the marshes. 
The curves along the shores of San Francisco Bay will be elimi- 
nated by filling in the ground, and Rodeo will become one of the 
most important shipping centers on the Bay. Point Pinole pro- 
ti is Rodeo from the wind to a great extent, and the railroad 
ii gim ■'-- Eeel sure that Rodeo will make a satisfactory transfer 
iir in lieu of Port Costa. Docks will be built at Rodeo, and 
the trains will be transferred by boat to South Vallejo, whence 
the main line will run to Flosden, through American Canyon 
to Cordelia, where it will connect with the Napa Junction and 
Suisun line, and with the main line to Sacramento and the 
Eastern States. It will also be possible to make connections 
with the Northwestern Pacific Railway from Tiburon and San 
Rafael to Ignacio, over the Sonoma branch to Buchli. and thence 
over the Santa Rosa line to Napa Junction and Suisun. The 
contemplated improvements will cost millions of dollars and are 
among the greatest that the Southern Pacific Company has un- 
dertaken in recent years. 

* • • 

The daily newspapers are so indefinite. One of them stated 
on Saturday that a Berkeley professor had been robbed of a 
large quantity of black hose, stolen from his front lawn. Socks, 
stockings or garden hose? Silk, cotton or wool? Peek-a-boo or 
close-woven? Long or short? Did they adorn an unattractive 
masculine foot, or were they adorned as well as filled by a portion 
of feminine anatomy? Or. after all, was the thing stolen just 
a plain garden hose through which water was squirted upon the 
professor's lawn? Not that it matters much, only it rather 
jars one to have the impression prevail that our university pro- 
fessors' clothes-lines are in their front yards. 

* * * 

The disgusting pictures and postals on exhibition in a number 
of the store windows in Oakland are a menace to the morals of 
the young people of the community and should be suppressed. 
Tn Berkeley, one store has. among its collection of postals in the 
window, the rooster postal, with a few verses of jingle that are 
ionahle to persons of refinement, especially the voung ladv 
students, who stop to purchase postals to send away to their 
friends. Let us have more views of the beautiful scenerv around 
Oakland and Berkeley, and fewer postals of the "rooster" class. 

* * * 

There should be sonic law in this State, since apparently there 
is none, to prevent the parents of a child forcing her to marry 
a man many times her senior, as occurred the other dav when. 
after chasing over half the Stale for a license, one Archulito, of 
Napa, managed to get a license to wed a girl of fifteen, although 
he is forty years her senior. Such a marriage is worse than a 
mockery: it can only end one way. hut even the divorce court 
cannot end the misery of the child wife. That the girl's mother 
vas 30 lost to all sense of decency as to urge the marriase, evi- 
dently from selfish motives, makes no difference. The Society 
for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children should be empowered 
to act in cases of that kind, and to take the child from her un- 
natural parents, while the law should prevent such marriages. Tt 



is not by any means creditable to the County Clerk of San 
Francisco that his office is the only one in the State that would 
issue a license for the unnatural union. 

The appearance of the streets of Oakland is being improved 
greatly by the removal of the poles upon which the electric wires 
have been supported. The disappearance of the wires and poles 
imparts an appearance of greater width and brightness to the 
streets. The Oakland Gas, Light and Heat Company is remov- 
ing the poles and wires from a larger district than is required 
by the city ordinance, and is prosecuting the work vigorously. 
The poles belonging to the telephone company and the We i ro 
Union Telegraph Company will be removed soon. The poles 
are cut through at the base level with the sidewalk and arc re- 
moved on trucks. The citizens of Oakland are to be congratu- 
lated on the disappearance of the unsightly poles and overhead 
wins from their principal thoroughfares. 

* * * 

The marriage of Mrs. Nicholas Richardson and Lloyd Bow- 
man was quietly solemnized in Santa Cruz recently. Mrs. Rich- 
ardson was formerly Miss Elsie Gregory, and since her tragically 
romantic marriage over a year ago, and her husband's dea h 
three days later, she has made her borne with her mother, Mrs. 
IT. K. Gregory at the latter'; home at Soquel, in the Santa Cruz 
mountains. Mr. Bowman is a university of California graduate 
and a civil engineer by profession. 

* • * 

Lincoln Steffens, of New York, the fearless writer for Mc- 

Clure's Magazine. Mr. and Mis. F. R. Southwood and Miss \\'il. 
kins of San Francisco, were al the Sea Beach. Saul a I'ruz. last 

week, enjoying the beautiful beach, and incidentally inspecting 

1 1 audit plant and other interesting industries in the vicinity 

of Santa Cruz. 

* * * 

District Attorney Campbell, of San .lose, and his daugl 
were the center of attraction at the beach al Santa Cruz one d rj 
last week because of the long swim they took. Starting from 
the shore, they went out around the Balboa and hack, a distance 
of one mile or more, making the entire trip with perfecl easi 
Miss Campbell is credited with being one of the most 
swimmers that has ever been in Santa Cruz. 



Fred Greenwood and his motor yacht, La Boheme, are again 

at the old moorings at Belvedere, after a stay of some length at 
Santa Cruz. Mr. Greenwood went to Santa Cruz to tr 
disprove that "never a dull moment" statement, but lil 
youth in search of the bag of gold at the end of the rainbow, 
was unsuccessful. 




MAKE YOUR BEDROOM 

Notable for its expression of refinement and feeling of repose. 
We will gladly" assist you in doing this with our carefully 
selected stock of Wall Paper and Fabrics. We carry- the 
things you are looking for, and at the right prices. 
L. TOZER &. SON CO. 
Interior Decorators 

1527 Pine St , Between Van New and Polk, San Franci»co. 
187 Twelfth St.. near Mactiion. Oakland. 



July 27, 1907. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



13 



Captain Ues VlcCrackin, Commander al Ware Island, is in 
Cruz with his wife and daughter. They recently made 
the trip to the Big Trees, and the Captain, who is quite 
of In* record as a pedestrian, made the return trip by foot in 

one hour and lii'i y minutes. 

* * * 

Supervisor Cheda, of Marin County, has been sued for 
$80,000 for neglecting to repair a bridge in his supervisorial 
district. The plaintiff, who rejoices in the picturesque name of 
Yank Xotr, fell through the bridge and sustained severe in- 
juries. 

* * * 

Sausalito is to have a direct ferry line with Oakland. The 
North-shore road has agreed to let the new company use its 
docks in Sausalito. The Ocean Wave, formerly the property of 

the Santa Fe, is to be the first boat on the new route. 

* * * 

Judge Lennon, of Marin County, is away on a vacation. 
When he returns he. will hear an argument upon the motion of 
Hiram Johnson to issue an injunction to restrain the pool-rooms 
of Sausalito from continuing in business, on the ground that 
they are a common nuisance. 

The women of the improvement clubs in Marin County are 
busy raising funds to exterminate the mosquito pest in that part 
of the State. 

* # * 

The annual summer wail for help comes from the fruit coun- 
try. At Marysville, live hundred hands are needed in the can- 
neries, but although help has been advertised for, it cannot be 
secured. Peaches are rotting on the trees, and there are pros- 
pects of a big loss. In spite of this condition of affairs there is 
a howl every time Oriental labor is suggested. If the Oriental 
labor competed with the white workers there would be some 
excuse for protests. But such is not the case. The whites will 
not do the work themselves, and will not allow any one else to 
do it. This dog in the manger policy is working incalculable 
harm to the fruit industry of the State, and will continue to do 

so as long as fanatics are allowed to have their way. 

* * * 

The town of Vallejo is all torn up over liquor license troubles. 
For a long time. Vallejo has had a hard reputation on account 
of the great number of low groggei ies there, the selling of steam 
beer to the men working in the navy yard being an extremely 
profitable business. The naval people stationed ai Vallejo didn't 
like this, and a year or so ago, after a hard light, they had the 
price of saloon licenses raised from <s " to $400 a year, putting 
a number of saloon- out of business. Some of them, however, 
have refused to stay put. Liquor was sold without a 
and the sellers, including two prominent groeerymen and a 
Chinese, have been arrested. They propose to stand trial and 
test the raliditj of the ordinance, I he people of the town have 
taken sides, as thej did over the passage of the ordinance, and 

feeling runs high. It is alii I of the of the 

saloon mi n thai favoritism has been shown in the granting of 

licenses. 

* * * 

Every little wh - though the labor union- bad 

reai hei demands and systematic holding-up 

of the public, and ju-i as the limit Beems I, they 

take '' ano >. and their new etfort so far overshadows 

their previous attempt that the latter is completely thrown into 
i, however, they must be very near the fur- 
possible point. There the unions have appointed . 
agent, whose duty it is to spy on the business men and citizens 
of the naval town and to report to the union all who give any 
patronage to the Chinese and Japan i their 

■1. without, of course. 
any hearing on the part of the accused, the latter is to be boy- 
cotted. This system is to be extended even to the drummers 
who may stop al a hotel employing nd any one who 

n are to b ong will the 

ry and 
i of this character? 

* * * 

iff no mor - of wild men of the bills. 

was the 
beard, and 
d oft whal 'iild find — anim 



An exceptional opportunity is presented for a limited number of 
young 1 dies to visit Europe this Fall, to study French, History and 
Art History; to attend courses of lecture in the leading colleges of 
France, and to acquire artistic and intellectual culture under the 
tutelage and chaperonage of 

Madame BOUGOUIN 

who is eminently well qualified to assume these responsibilities, by 
long residence abroad and thorough knowledge of French. 

As the time for making arrangements is limited, interested per- 
sons are invited to communicate at once with oMadame Bougouin's 
Western representative, rJTWrs. I. M. C. Smith, 432 N. Fifth St., San 
Jose, who will be pleased to give full particulars. 



presumably snakes and toads. At any rate, it adds interest to 
the speculations anent him to imagine that reptiles formed part 
of bis diet. Moreover, he could run. He was captured only 
after long pursuit, and finally had to be roped. Hereafter, we 
will refrain from laughing at sea-serpent stories, for if there 
are wild men it stands to reason that there are huge snakes in 
the sea. 



WESTERN WORLD. 
Read Assistant District Attorney Cook's article on the "De- 
lays of the Bar." Cartoon by Maynaid Dixon, "Justice Entan- 
gled." Western World this week, all news dealer-. 



The music at the Little Palace Hotel is a feature that 

lends much to the enjoyment of the visitor. The orchestra is 
unusually good. 



Judicious Purchasing 

of the material in your building means more 
profit on your investment. Buy from us, as 
sales agents of California's best constructive 
materials. ffl Our quality is unsurpassed and 
San Francisco benefits by our prices. Q It 
means money to you, whether owner, architect 
or contractor. 

Our Lines Comprise 

Cement— Standard Portland Cement. Santa Cruz 
Portland Cement. 

Lime— Holmes Lime Co., brands. 

Plaster— Marbleite Hardwall Plaster. 

Brict— Central Brick Co., Red and Repressed, 
Carnegie Brick and Pottery Co., Fire and 
Face Brick, Sewer Pipe and Terra Cotta. 

Crushed Rock— Good quality. "Blue Trap." 

WESTERN BUILDING MATERIAL CO. 

430 California St. Phone Temporary 2647 San Francisco 



A Shipment, of the Highest, Grade of Tea 

Never before sold in this country. Comes ftosn a private plantation in China, and before has 
been used only by ihe Chinese Royal Family and Use wealthy classes of Chinese. This is the 
not opportunity for people of other countries to hare for use a finer and better tea than ever 
before has been allowed to pass out of China. 

YANG-TSE-RIVXR TEA CO. 

Retrr to A. S. Frost. 

714 Webster Street, 313 8th Street, Oakland, Cal. 

1 859 Post Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 27, 1907. 




The presence of the Longworths has given society a midsum- 
mer thrill that is doubly welcome in the dull season. Long before 
their arrival, the rumor that they intended to side-step social 
obligations played tag with the insistent report that society was 
very glad to escape offering incense at the Roosevelt-Longworth 
altar. The doctor having thus prescribed a full diet of "sour 
grapes,"' all around, the patients proceeded to disregard his or- 
ders with charming inconsistency. The Longworlhs have spent 
most of their short married life dodging cameras and social 
obligations, and they were determined to have a "go-as-you- 
please" vacation. But a close observer of human nature tells 
me that Princess Alice was really piqued when the public took 
her literally. There wasn't any particular fun in foregoing 
society when society did not meet one even half way. The smart 
set leaders did not plead for a chance to entertain the Presi- 
dent's daughter. They sent their cards and American beauty 
roses, and then ran off to play in their own back yards, while the 
Princess Alice sat up and observed that San Francisco does not 
turn the other cheek. 

The first few days of the Longworths' stay at the Fairmont 
Hotel was not very exciting. To be sure, Senator Newlands 
entertained them at luncheon , an informal, arranged-an-hour- 
before luncheon, with just the host, the Longworths and Mr. 
Kelham around the flowery board. The bell-boys' important 
treble crying "Call for 249." "telephone for same."" "telegram 
for same," "cards for same," did not punctuate the luncheon. 
In fact, the Longworths not only were not besieged, they were 
not even bothered with claimants to do them social honor. The 
Princess Alice, not knowing of the word that had gone forth, 
must really have been amazed at the indifference of San Fran- 
cisco. Here was a young woman who has been Eeted the seven 
seas over, the wide world around, and then to meet with a frosty 
reception by the hospitable Golden Gate! Of course she has 
had a surfeit of luncheons and teas and dinners, and all that, 
but don't you suppose that under that broad-brimmed hal there 
was room for a few misgivings about meeting a frost in July and 
in San Francisco, of all places in the world. 

Mrs. Longworth hasn't changed her character as well as her 
name from Alice Roosevelt. She didn't mope around ruminat- 
ing upon the difference between being a President's daughter 
with Cupid still in the ring, and being a Congressman's wife. 
She saw everything worth seeing in the town, and collected be- 
sides a set of fire and earthquake pictures worth the having. And 
then just the day before they started for Lake I to visit 

Mrs. Longworth's relatives, the Hammonds, the "cat was let out 
of the bag," with Mrs. Eleanor Martin, as becomes the dowager 
empress of society, pulling the string. Mrs. Martin told .Mrs. 
Longworth that she was so sorry their Hint-like determination 
to eschew all social gatherings would prevent her entertaining 
in their honor. Andthen Mrs. Longworth said that while their 
trip was not a social pilgrimage, yet they would have been 
delighted to accept her hospitality. Whereupon Mrs. Martin 
explained that even before they left Washington the report was 
broadcast that social entertainment was barred from their itin- 
erary, and at frequent intervals this statement was reiterah 
that people here believed proffered entertainment would be in 
bad taste and simply put them to the pains of a polite refusal. 
. To prove her willingness to be led to the social slaughter, Mrs. 
Longworth agreed to devote AVednesday their one free date be- 
fore the steamer left for Honolulu, to social diversions. At this 
writing. Wednesday, every one who is spelled with a capital E 
has scurried back from here, there and everywhere so as to be 
"among those present." The Longworths motored down to 
Burlingame this morning, and after the luncheon at the Bur- 
lingame Club, over which Mrs. Rudolph Spreckels and Mrs. 
Martin will preside, there will be another motor ride and a 
"hurry call" for a change in costume for the dinner and recep- 
tion at the Martin home in Broadway. Unfortunately this edi- 
tion is tucked into press too early to give further details about 
these affairs. But it is perfectly safe to predict that no one who 
receives an invitation and who was within train, steamer or 



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automobile distance, failed to get here and break the summer 
monotony by such concentrated diversion as a luncheon and din- 
ner in one day, and the Longworths served with every course. 

There have been any number of informal, yet nevertheless 
smart, little luncheons and dinners at the Fairmont Hotel. 
One of the most perfect luncheons ever served in San Francisco 
was that which the Longworths gave last week with Ethel Barry- 
more as guest of honor. Another prettily appointed luncheon 
was presided over by Eugene Lent, with W. R. Hearst and his 
sweet young wife as guests of honor. The Leopold M ichuels re- 
cently entertained at a delightful dinner, among their guests 
being Miss Lily O'Connor, and ThomwaD Mullalley. 

Eleanor Martin, Mrs. Rudolph Spreckels and Miss Virginia 
Jolliffe mad.' an interesting group at a luncheon table the other 
day. .Mrs. Qrundy lias been whispering that Virginia's affilia- 
tion with the Crocker-Scott elan has made a rift in the sisterly 
lute, but evidently there is no truth in the report that Mrs. 
Spreckels and her dashing young sister are no longer en rap- 
port. 

Society is rery much interested in the engagement announce- 
of Miss Ruth Adam- ami Mr. Frank" Godfrey, a prominent 

young Englishman of Riverside. Miss Adams is a sister of Mrs. 
J. P. Jackson, and spends much of her time at the Jacksons' 
country place ai Burlingame. She is a strikingly handsome girl 
of an unusual type — raven black hair, creamy complexion, and 
blue eyes. Miss Ldams has traveled abroad extensively, the 
fortune which her father left her being adequate for her every 
desire. The Godfrey orange grove at Riverside is beautifully 
situated, and as its mistress. Miss Adams has a delightful pros- 
pect. There are a number of charming people living in the or- 
ange groves around Riverside, and diversions at the Country 
Club are frequent. 

The Bonynges appear to he favorites of royalty. On July the 
'■'I'll they were honored by the presence ai lunch of their Royal 
Highnesses the Princess Christian and Princess Victoria. Their 
daughter. Lady Maxwell, on the 5th of July, entertained their 
Royal Highnesses the Duke and Duchess of Connaught and 
l'i incess Patricia. 

* * * 

Captain \\ . II. Whiting, of the U. S. Navy, with Mrs. and 
Miss Whiting and Dr. A. Parenholt, of Berkeley, have been 
spending some rime ai the Sea Beach, Santa Cruz. Mrs. Whit- 
ing was oi E the charming ^fong girls of Honolulu. 

Mrs. J. M. Ghiradelli and daughter. Miss Carmen, of Pied- 
mont, spent last week at the Sea Beach in Santa Cruz. 

Miss Emma E. Mahoney, of Oakland, one of the si charm*- 

tng 30i iety girls on that side of the bay, has returned home after 
in .)'<-' ace of several weeks at Santa Cruz. 



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July 27, 1907. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISES. 



15 



Mr. R. H. Davis, President of the Commercial Travelers' As- 

atiort, with Mrs. Davis and Miss Ethel Davis, are spending 

some time at Brookdale, and make frequent visits to Santa Cruz. 

Among the San Francisco people who are registered at the 
Sea Beach are Mr. and Mrs. Milton Pray, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph 
Kirk, and Miss Theresa Miller, Mr. and Mrs. William A. Magee, 
William A. Magee, Jr., Harry A. and Miss Elizabeth A. Magee, 
W. 8. GoodfeUow, wife, children and maid, A. W. Higgins and 
family, E. H. Prentiss, John Martin, L. P. Lowe, Charles Belden 
and family, now of New York, but formerly of San Francisco, 
and Mrs. Herman Shainwald. 

M is. Clarence Martin Mann has spent the past month in Santa 
Cruz. 

Dr. Lu Ella Cool Walker, who has taken out a hunter's 
license, is an expert with a gun, of long standing. The bull's- 
eye is an easy mark in our shooting galleries, where she practices 
to keep a steady nerve to be used in her professional life. It 
used to be an easy thing for her while driving to bring down a 
bird at long range with a 22 rifle. She is also a good horse- 
woman, and oftimes remarks she was bom on horseback, and % 

dentist. 

* * * 

Many residents of San Francisco are deeply grieved at the un- 
timely death of Lieutenant Caspar Goodrich, in the terrible ac- 
cident on the battleship Georgia last week. Young Goodrich 
served as aide on the staff of his father, Rear-Admiral Goodrich, 
while that officer was commander-in-chief of the Pacific station. 
He was a highly efficient young officer, the highest type of the 
"officer and the gentleman," and promised to make a name for 
himself. Upon his promotion to a lieutenancy in the summer of 
1900, young Goodrich was given a congratulatory luncheon by 
some of his friends at the Press Club, who greatly regretted that 
his. promotion necessitated his departure for the East, to take 
charge of the gun division on the Georgia, where he met his 

death. 

* * * 

The appointment of Captain 0. F. Bagder as superintendent 
of the United States Naval Academy insures a good adminis- 
tration for that institution for the next few years. Captain Bad- 
ger is well known on the Pacific Coast, having been in command 
of the flagship Chicago, under the flag of Rear- Admiral Caspar 
F. Goodrich, during the fire in this city in April, 1906, when 
the men under Badger did excellent work along the waterfront. 



HE FAILED— AND WHY? 

He failed — and why? 

Because he strove 
To walk the paths 

Through Pleasure's grove; 
Bei nise to him 

All work was pain; 
Because he fought 

No goal to gain. 

He failed — and him. 

The world will blame; 

For him to work- 
Was naught but shame; 

So while him round 
The victors won. 

He sank to death. 
Hia task undone. 

Burton Jackson Wymax. 



The Eog days and the days of the trade winds are cer- 
tainly disagreeable. San Rafael is just far enough away so that 
neither of these bother the sojourner. The Hotel Rafael is the 
ideal summer and winter resort. It is agreeably situated on a 
knoll or elevation, and is never subject to the fogs of San 
winds. The service cannot be equaled. 
and the hotel ivorite week-end rest spot for the San Fran- 
lite. 



j - ■-. of the Chicago University, says China 

. reatest nation on earth. She certainly has 
the men, and may have the guns. 



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Own A Home 

' Ten Minutes Walk From 

Notel del Monte 

It's now possible for you to own a home within ten 
minutes' walk of Hotel del Monte — the most delightfully 
located hotel in all the world. 

Del Monte is famous for its magnificent seventeen-mile 
drive over mountains and along ocean shore, its forests of 
cypress, pine and oaks, its lake, gardens and lawns, its race 
course, golf links and tennis courts, its swimming pavilion 
and surf bathing in the warm, placid waters of Monterey 
Bay, its fine fishing and hunting; in fact, its hundred 
other features endowed by nature. 

All the charms that go to make Hotel del Monte famous 
can now be enjoyed by you — all are at the very door of the 
home you can now own at 

Del Monte Heights 

Del Monte Heights surround Lake del Rey, a beautiful 
body of water that is soon to be transformed into a minia- 
ture Naples or Venice with boats, gondolas, concert pavil- 
ion and myriads of electric lights. 

Del Monte Heights will have a bath house on the beach 
only a few minutes' walk from where you can own a home. 

All streets will be en and oiled. Trees will 

be planted along the side walks. There will be alleys in 
the rear of each lot to carry sewer and water pipes and 
all wires. 

An electric line will be built connectiie: Del Monte 
Heights with Monterey and Pacific 1 1 

Southern Pacific has a station at Del Monte Be 
and a schedule of convenience to all who live in San Fran- 
cisco or the Santa Clara Valley. At present there are many 
trains a day that stop at Del Monte HeL' 

New roads now buildim: between Monterey and Fresno 
will make easy access to Del Monte Heights for people liv- 
ing in the San Joaquin or Salinas Valli 

Company has arranged to build your house for you as 
soon as your lot is paid for. Payments on the house like 
paying rent. 

Buy a lot in Del Monte Heights now while prices are the 
very lowest. 

Improvements to a locality bring people — and popula- 
tion makes property more valuable. Buy now and soon 
double your money. 

Lots $100 to $300 all sold on easy terms, some as low as 
$5 down. 

Own a home at Hotel del Monte. Send for book!, 
ing complete information. 

PHELPS-LEWIS CO. 

Geaeral Ag«ati 

French Bant Building. 110 Sutter St., San Francisco. 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 27, 1907. 




'/ieardeCntrlhio fcjevilrt Una T' 
Qae Qui will flay the devil.sir, wifijcv. 

.Tack London has furnished an Eastern magazine with an- 
other installment of his remarkable confessions. It is probable 
that no man ever printed more shameless stuff about himself, 
unless it be 'he murderous Harry Orchard. Even Orchard, in 
his confession, shows himself to be a man of nerve and a certain 
amount of character. But Jack London's revelations regarding 
his life as a tramp show him to have been, in plain words, a lazy, 
shiftless bum, ready to take the bread from the mouths of the 
hungry in order to fill his own slothful carcass. His last article 
deals with his life in an Eastern prison, to which he was sent for 
vagrancy. He rails vigorously against the law that sent 
him to jail, but he has no argument to offer against the de- 
cree of the court except that he would rather be free to steal rides 
on trains and beg handouts from back doors. In jail he was 
a trusty, and he describes with disgusting detail the graft in 
which he took part. He and a few others in authority got a cor- 
ner on the food supply, and made the starving prisoners give 
them tobacco for bread. They beat and abused the prisoners 

under them. Listen to this: "Our rule was to hit a man a- - I 

as he opened his mouth — hit him hard, hit him with anything. 
A broom-handle, end-on. in the face had a very sobering effect. 
But that was not all. Such a man must be made an example 
of: so the next rule was to wade right in and follow him up. Of 
course, one was sure that every hall-man (trusty) in sight would 
come on the run to join in the chastisement : that also was the 
rule. Whenever any hall-man was in trouble with a prisoner, 
the duty of any other hall-man who happened to be around was 
to lend a fist. Never mind the merits of the case — wade in and 
hit. and hit with anything; in short, lay the man out." This is 
the socialist, Jack London, who professes such an overpowering 
love for his fellow-man. especially the down-trodden. God pity 
the socialist who had to be ruled by London's brutal fist. 

"Music hath charms to soothe the savage breast." Peter 

Alphonse. of 911 Folsom street, had wandered around the steam 
beer parlors of the water front the whole night long, and at four 
o'clock in the morning wandered into a Third street saloon. 
Peter felt savage, on account of the beer, and felt that nothing 
short of music would soothe him. In order that his soul might 
be placated, he dropped a nickel into an automatic piano player 
— for Peter, being full of beer, was foolish enough to bi 
that real music comes out of these things. But as even imitation 
music in saloons is forbidden alter 1 a. m.. the barkeeper refused 
to stir up the machinery. Then Peter -tailed to stir up the bar- 
keeper. The struggle was short and bloody. When he had suffi- 
ciently battered Peter's lace, the barkeeper threw him out of 
the front door with the rude and ribald remark: "You first, 
Alphonse." Thus is the savage breast denied the soothing that 
it craves. 

It is curious the mistakes that the editors of usually well 

edited papers ami magazines occasionally make. Only recently 
one of our city dailies told the story of the cruiser Columbia 
"since, she returned from her famous trip around South America 
with Secretary of War Tat'l." Last Sunday the Chronicle com- 
pared the office-holding propensities of John P. Irish with 
•■Emerson's brook flowing on and on," and one of the weeklies 
commented upou "Shakespeare's Richelieu!" But it is not only 
in the West that such palpable blunders are made, for The Inde- 
pendent of New York, not so very long ago, declared that Pius 
X was not following in the footsteps of Leo XIY. which is not 
extraordinary, since there never were but thirteen Leos. Another 
Eastern publication located Bismarck (capital of Dakota) in 
Missouri, and the Review of Reviews made nearly as had a slip 
when it located an African town in South America. 

The committee that has charge of what remains of the 

street car strike has issued a statement warning the public 
against impostors who are collecting money on the pretense that 
it is to be used for the benefit of the strikers. The committee it- 
self should be warned against a certain impostor named Cor- 
nelius, who is collecting some $465 a month from the car- 
men for leading them in a useless fight. 



Richard Cornelius, the alien Socialist, who invoked the 

carmen's strike, now ended, is quoted as saying in an address 
to some of his kind in Stege last Sunday that "Calhoun is the 
best fighter I have ever met thus far." For once in his life, 
Cornelius is quite right. Not only Cornelius, of whom Calhoun 
made short work, but others higher up are discovering that they 
have caught a Tartar. Of fighting stock, he will yet make 
things decidedly interesting for some ambitious and prominent 
persons who have sought to advance their own interests by taking 
advantage of a supposed local opposition to Calhoun. To the 
surprise and chagrin of these persons, however, Calhoun has 
not only won great popularity by his sturdy leadership in the 
fight against the anarchistic unions, but his victory over the 
carmen has been followed by victories of the employers over 
each of the other striking unions, which, in the moment of the 
city's need, struck and sought to retard resurrection, regardless 
of the interests of San Francisco, so long as their own selfish 
interests might be subserved. The machinists, the telephone 
operators, the brewery workers and the telegraphers have one 
after the other been well beaten in their strikes, and have served 
a good purpose in warning others. 

The fanaticism of the union labor dupes is amazing and 

pathetic. One feels sorry for the thousands of them who, help- 
ing to support a strike acknowledged to be unjust, ride to and 
from work in the bone-racking wagons that bump over our un- 
even streets. 1 was talking the other day with a union laborer 
who is lame. He lives twenty blocks from his work, yet when he 
cannot find a wagon in which to ride, he limps painfully the 
entire distance rather than patronize the cars, lie was uphold- 
ing the right of men to organize, and 1 agreed with him. "T'he 
unions are all right." I remarked, "as long as they don't throw 
bricks." He looked at me in astonishment. "How else are you 
going to keep people from riding on the cars ?" he asked. "Didn't 
it ever occur to you," I inquired, "that people have the right to 
ride on the cars if they want to ?" His look of astonishment gave 
way to one of suspicion. He had a very strongly developed idea 
that I was insane. 

The Government is taking active steps in Chicago against 

the anarchists who infest that town. One hundred and sixty-three 
alleged "reds" have been cited to show cause why they should 
not be deported. One of the suspects is a woman teacher in the 
public schools. The action on the part of the Government was 
taken on the discovery that owing to a loop-hole in the naturaliza- 
tion machinery of Chicago, hundreds of dangerous foreigners 
had been admitted to citizenship. It has also been disclosed that 
wholesale frauds in the way of naturalization have been carried 
on. It is only recently that the Government's secret service 
agents closed a long campaign conducted in this city against 
naturalization frauds. They made a large number of arrests, 
and succeeded in sending several people to prison. 

Elisor Biggy has evidently reformed since he was a State 

Senator and voted for a Superintendent of the Mint for United 
States Senator instead of for Phelan, because the Superintendent 
promised to give him the Mint washing as a reward for his vote. 
Biggy, by the way, was only a driver of a laundry wagon when 
he went to Sacramento, but pretty soon after that event he blos- 
somed forth as one of the owners of a laundry. Then, has the 
Examiner forgotten how hard it sought to prove thai Biggy, 
while a Senator, traveled on a pass, while a member of the Com- 
mittee on Public Buildings in Southern California ? When those 
events in Biggy's life are recalled, it seems especially appropriate 
that he should have been selected as the only safe keeper of Kind. 

There should be more severe laws against reckless hunt- 
ers. Near I'kiah on Saturday a boy was dangerously wounded 
under peculiarly aggravated circumstances. Two fools with guns 
had shot at a deer and were watching for it to emerge into the 
open. They saw a movement in the brush, and without waiting 
to see what was the cause of it, they fired, dangerously wounding 
i he boy. Jail should be the penalty for such an offense. Fifty 
thousand licenses to shoot have been granted this year. It is ap- 
palling to reflect on what a proportion of these hunters are ama- 
teurs who hardly know one end of the gun from the other, and 
who are a constant menace to every one who is traveling through 
the woods. 

A Berkeley woman was asked by her hostess: "What part 

of the chicken do you prefer?" "Oh, any part but the neck or 
the gizzard. That is the part my husband always gives me." A 
feast of smiles was the next course. 



July 27, 1907. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



17 



®lj? fflM&Ut nf iFnretgtt Affairs 

'The Humbug of the Ages. 

Without an opposing voice the Hague Peace Congress ha pui 
itself on record as being the champion humbug of the ages, li 
has had a score of issues before ii for the betterment of tho 
nations in their international concerns, but only two have aroused 
any interest, and one of those is regarded as a joke, and the 
other an act of treachery that should make all honest people pray 
that the convention would adjourn and destroy its records. The 
joke was the long and learned speech of our own detonate, Mr. 
Choate. It was an eloquent plea, between smiles, for an inter- 
national arbitration court clothed with practically supreme au- 
thority to hear and determine differences between nations. The 
delegates applauded Mr. Choate to the echo, but for his elo- 
quence and his apparent earnestness and sincerity. It was a 
marvelous exhibition of Yankee cunning in the use of words. If 
there is any one thing more than another that the nations would 
not agree to it is any compact that would tie their hands when a 
war is wanted. The other act was to refuse to recognize the dele- 
gates from Korea at the request of Japan, who was intriguing 
to force the Emperor of Korea to obdicate, so that the Tenyo 
would have less trouble in stealing the empire. The Hague 
played directly into their hands on the flimsy grounds that the 
Japanese delegation could represent Korea quite as well. This 
meant that the convention would hold the hands of Korea while 
Japan cut its throat. Naturally, the Emperor of Korea, as well 
as his subjects, would protest against such an outrage, and for 
protesting, Japan forced the Koreans to give her an excuse to 
place the country under military rule, which will end in Korea 
being as much the territory of the Tenyo as Nippon is. It was 
the coldest-blooded hold-up and confiscation of property the 
world has seen since the Spanish invaded the Americas. And 
while all this was going on, the Hague Conference looked the 
other way and smiled the smile of ignorance and innocence. But 
the end is not yet. The more than 12, 000,000 Koreans have yet 
to be brought into submission to Japan. On the other hand, the 
great Christian nations of Great Britain, Prance, the United 
States and Russia are giving Japan their moral support, which 
means that the Emperor of Korea and his subjects and his em- 
pire are even now the subjects and property of Japan. 

The reason why the Christian nations just mentioned are sup- 
porting Japan is clear enough. When the Portsmouth Conven- 
tion concluded its labors, the News Letter pointed out how Mr- 
treaty between Russia and Japan provided for the absorption if 

Korea by Nippon without opposition from Russia, but the details 
were to be left for further negotiations in which England and 
France would lie interested. Marly last Bpring the Newe Lettei 
announced that a Japanese envoy had reached St. Petersburg to 
add another chapter to the Portsmouth treaty which should de- 
i i ii.- certain territorial rights, and sine the Hague Congress mcl 
it has been semi-olliciallv announced thai the Japanese envoi 
to the Russian capital had made the i al, and th 

much more than fishing and commercial rights were involved. 
And new comes the reason why the B die Korean dele- 

gation the cold shoulder, li transpires that the nev. 
between Japan ami Ku Russia a free hand in Mongolia, 

the largest of China's provinces, and Japan very extended boun- 
dary lines iii Sfanchuria, and Russia's full consent to th 
throw of Korea by Japan. It must be I i that these 

nducted and eo hed withou! 

consulting China, but it may be relied upon tl I ad and 

Prance wei ■ wi ' what was going on. What the net 

gain to England and France will be is not difficult to see. France 
is thoro tired in her Coachin-China possessions, and Eng- 

land i- niist Russian invasion of India and her influence 

u Persia and Thibet farther strengthened. Russia can non- 
he Siberian railway, and reach 
where navigation is neve; 

ing the rail distance be wi I S 
Petereb si 1,500 miles, Japan may 

- Korea and the whole ol Mam hi 
ten and Port Arthur, and between tl 
i on tho east. In -' 

■r has 
on. now putting their machinery in 
■ t in their mutual in 
rily a partner because she would bo needed in ease Ger- 



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many should undertake to get a foot-hold on the southern shore 
of the Mediterranean. 

There is some alarm in Holland lest the Par East combination 
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Java, which is rich in ground products, woods and minerals, with 
its population of 25,000,000 of hewers of wood and drawers of 
water, who are little better off than slaves to dig and delve for 
their owners' profit. 



THE GOD OF TO-DAY. 

The savage of to-day and our own immediate ancestors pre- 
dicted a god for every mystery beyond their ken. We of this 
age, materialistic and cynical, have demolished all the gods of 
antiquity and placed science and mathematics in control. There 
is no mystery about anything any more. Man knows all about 
the creation — hut not from the Bible. He has gleaned his an- 
cestry in the recesses of the rocks, and recognizes his progeni- 
tors in the lower forms of life of to-day. 

When Professor Tyndall. thirty years ago, in his Belfast ad- 
dress, stated substantially that if it were given him to look back 
into the annals of unrecorded time, he would expect to witness a 
period when the ancestors of his audience could not be called 
human, the execrations of every fox-hunting parson in England 
were heaped on his head. 

When Kingdon Clifford stated that if he were able to pene- 
trate into the dim dawn of history, he could trace the origin of 
all gods in the great god — Man — who made all gods and shall 
unmake them, religious people prayed for him. The assertions 
of these two eminent scientists are being daily corroborated, and 
i tie acceptance of their dicta is being more and more common- 
place. Orthodox Christianity is a dead creed, but from I lie 
Book upon which it was founded can be garnered the true pur- 
poses and meaning of life. 



Real and tangible fault lias been found with Mayor Tay- 
lor. "What does he know about politics?'' asks one of the prac- 
tical ones, "'there are a hundl outh of .Market 
that know more about polities than he ever dreamed.' 5 For which 

Ord be praised, for five years the city has been bin 

by a Mayor ." and the resull has been 

lamentable. It tin i have 

a decent city governm 

Baume Betulae, the greatest relief for Rheumatism. Neuralgia. Sclat- 
50 rents at druggists. 



The Little Palace Hotel is now the center of attraction 

when luncheon and dinner is to be discus* 




J&/fa/JiSiauz&a//r eSots 



A C I and Drink 

Eat POI and Grow Healthy in 

Body and Brain 

It is Natures Best Remedy for Dyspepsia 

and Indigestion 

Nourishing and Strengthening 

SenJ >0c for a box by return mail. 

liOLDBERG BOWEN & CO. 
Jfttid 

IFORNTA 



andandInvest/untGo. 
akep 0"rt. \ak e c . c al . 
Jen? for Snaps in Farms. 

LITERATURE Cn f\PPUCr\T|ON 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 27, 1907. 




INANOAL 




The Value or Local 
Points. 



The Murchie Extension Gold Min- 
A Likely Subject fob bag Co., incorporated, it is said, 
consular Enquiry. under the laws of Arizona, but which 

is said to hail from this city, baa 
run foul of the London Financial News, which does not deal 
kindly with its affairs by any means. This company, which has 
a share capital of $2,500,000, has what purports to be a "trust 
fund guarantee," and this is what has drawn the fire from the 
powerful financial journal. According to the prospectus, every 
share of the Murchie Extension Company is protected by a 
special trust or guarantee fund, which contains securities worth 
at present market prices about i'o'in.ii'Mi. ,,r marly $3,000,000, 
the principal conditions of which are as follows : 

"If, after a reasonable amount of development work on the 
property results should not prove successful, or if the further op- 
eration of any such company should not prove profitable or satis- 
factory, the shareholders in any such company will be given 
from this trust fund, in exchange, without any further expense 
to them, shares in some other company or companies that have 
proven successful, for the full equivalent of their original in- 
vestment, thus guaranteeing them satisfactory profits and mak- 
ing a loss impossible. This arrangement is based practically on a 
mutual life insurance plan, whereby each company financed by 
- aside or reserves a certain portion of its shares for the 
mutual protection or insurance of the shareholders of every other 
company, and it is made in advance to provide against any pos- 
sible contingency which might arise. This trust fund guarantee 
at once removes the Murchie Extension shares from the specula- 
tive class, and makes them an absolutely safe, si mud, guaranteed 
investment of unquestioned security and of the highest earning 
capacity."' 

This proposition appears to the Financial News in the light of 
an offer upon the part of people worth $3,000,000 in securities 
to employ them in guaranteeing the mining speculations of 
ile. "And they are willing to do this, moreover,'' it 
continues, "'although such speculation is to take place in shares 
which they themselves regard as not worth buying." The sug- 

mplating buyers request the Murchie 
Extension to deposit the $3,000,000 guarantee fund with a first 
in bank, and that the bank be authorized to pay out of 
it the nrred by the purchasers. When this fund has 

been deposited, and the intending buyer has received official 
bank to that effect, it will then be time enough 
— it is said — for the intending buyer to complete the purchase. 
It certainly does look an absurd proposition for the owner of 
this large amount of securities to be engaged in an attempt to 
M'll shares in a mining company, and especially in a place like 
London, where a veritable gold brick of the candlestick brand 
might be worked off all right, so long as there was no guarantee 
attached to picion. The vendors are evidently tender- 

feet in promotion circles in the British metropolis. Would it 
not be as well to pass the matter up to the British Consulate 
city as a fitting subject lor investigation. 

The San Francisco Bond and Mort- 

Up-to-Date IVnvncial gage Company, recently incorpor- 

Iiika. I for the purpose of lending 

money on income property of this 

city, is now inviting subscriptions for its capital stock of 

$10,000,000, divided into shares of $100 each. It is the first 

company of the kind ever organized on the Pacific Coast, and 

e response to the demand for immense sums of 

money required for reconstruction purposes. The plan has been 

with much success in the Eastern and European financial 

■■-. It is proposed to lend money on approved mortgages, 

which will be assigned to a trustee and against them will be 

issued the mortgage bonds of l he company. No change in 

securities will bi id without the consent of the trustee. 

The money realized from the sale oi these mortgages will be 

jages assigned to the trustee against 

-iiij of additional bonds, which in turn will be sold, the 

process being repea en as the business warrants. 



The News Letter had a query the 
other day from an Eastern sub- 
scriber asking what a "point" meant 
in the financial parlance of the city. 
Once upon a tune it stood for a dollar when the old Comstoeks 
were quoted up in the hundreds of dollars per share. Were they 
still leading the market as formerly it would probably stand for 
the same rate, but since the people connected with the new 
Nevada mines have practically taken control of the situation, it 
stands for "one cent," a very material difference. Il sounds nice 
in reporting the action of the markets to talk about an advance 
or decline in "points." It gives an air of importance to proceed- 
ings which would be sadly lacking were the situation presented 
Literally in plain ordinary cents. Besides, outside of the few 
left who were accustomed to the higher class operations of the 
good old "bonanza" days, it makes little difference. Cents are 
a recognized feature of the game now, whereas formerly no one 
ever heard of them individually in the matter of quotations. 
Some people may to-day think the change for the better; some 
for the worse. It all depends possibly where one was born and 
brought up. 

The local market for New Nevada 
Mixing Shark Market, mining shares lias not shown the ac- 
tivity expected during the past week. 
From the news received from the mines and llie comparatively 
large outpul of bullion reported for the week from both the 
Tonopah ami Goldfield mines, an upheaval of some kind in 
prices was looked for by shareholders. But in this they were 
noil. The dull condition of the market, in face of such 
bright reports, is attributed in a large measure to the circulation 
of bear reports, based upon alleged labor troubles brewing at 
Coldfield, allusion to which is made elsewhere in this article. 
There is nothing in these rumors, according to well informed 
men on the street, and the action of the people responsible for 
mis-statements of the kind is roundly condemned by all respect- 
able dealers connected with the market. However, in this class 
of business, men can always be found mean enough to stoop to 
any low trick which will give them an advantage. All they are 
after is money, and so long as they get that, the ways and means 
do not count; as for such a thing as conscience, they are not 
troubled with the article in their make up. On the oilier hand, 
the demand for the leading Comstock shares has been quite ac- 
tive, and in the ease of Ophir, tin- advance in price has been 
marked. The official reports from the front for the week show 
considerable mining activity in the middle mines and in the 
group around the Ward Shaft. In Savage, preparations are now 
being made to upraise is the ore recently cut in the south-east 
drift on the Sutro Tunnel level. From the east cross-cut, on the 
same level in Hale and Norcross, some high grade ore, averaging 
$47. "2 4, is now being extracted. During the past week, the Ward 
shaft has been sunk an additional four feet, making its total 
depth to date 2,52G feet below the collar. The strong tone of 
these old-time favorites gives much satisfaction to friends of the 
Comstock. ami the hup,-, is expressed that the activity will con- 
tinue and put this branch of the market on its feet again. 

Public notice has just been given, by 
United Railroads Xew the filing of a certificate with the 
Stock Issue. County Clerk, of the action of the 

I holders of the United Railroads 

on June '-"-d last, in voting to increase the number of the com- 

i shares of preferred stock from 200,000 shares at a par 

,i e of •■■■jii. nun. linn. [,, .'Mi. i shares, at a par value of $25,- 

000,000. The new prefer! id -lock, it is arranged, is to take 
precedence over all other stock, both preferred and common. It 
will draw T per cent dividend out of surplus net profits, and is to 
be redeemable at the option of the company, after six months 
notice, at $110 per share. 

The demand for local stocks and 
Local STOCKS wo bonds seems to have failed entirely 

Bonds. for the time being, and investors are 

quietly awaiting some indications of 
a turn for the better in the eondii ions of affairs. There will 
have to lie some guarantee of civic peace and an ending of local 

labor troubles before confidence will be restored 
monied classes so they will feel justified in placing their surplus 
funds in industrial enterprises which, under existing conditions, 
are apt to be tied up at any moment to the serious loss of all con- 
cerned. The sugar stocks should do better, a© ording to the re- 
ports coming from the islands. The late-, report from the 



July 87, 1907. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



19 



Hawaiian Commercial Company's plantation was that the crop 

lount to 44,153 tons, against the manager's previous 

estimate of 13,000 tons. The production of Paauhau is said to 

be ;.*'.'•"> tons against the previous official estimate of 1,m ins. 

The markel for bar silver is much firmer than LI was. The price 
reached 69 1-8 in New York during the week, and 3] L3-16 in 
London. 

There are quite a number of large 
Shorts on Ophie u:e bear operators on Bush Btreet who 
Ii'ipi mieli Up. have, it is believed, a day of reckon- 

ing at hand, that is, it they have 
shorted Ophir in the past to anything like the extent they have 
bragged about. In order to fill their shorts they will now have 
to enter the market, something they have managed to forestall 
for many months past, and buy in stock so as to protect their 
sales. This will be absolutely necessary in order to exchange the 
old stock for the new, which has been issued in the form of a 
stock dividend during the past week, and have it registered on 
the books of the company. It may be possible to stave off the 
evil day for a little while, but it must come eventually, and then 
the bull faction on the street should take a trick or two, and even 
up some of the old scores of the past. The general verdict 
among dealers in Comstock shares is that these operators are 
simply getting what they richly deserve. 

The success of the Bonnie Claire 
mine seems now to be an assured 

fact. In a recent report on the 

property, the manager is ac- 
credited with the statement that on that property alone, belong- 
ing In the company, there is enough ore to keep one hundred 
stamps running for years. In regard to the new twenty stamp 
mill just started up, it is said that ten stamps are now working 
with three tables, and that ten stamps will be added as it be- 
comes desirable. A shipment of two hundred tons of $60 ore 
will, it is said, be started to the Salt Lake smelters next week, 
and that within 90 days the shipments of this character of ore 
will run up In "'00 tons weekly. There are now 60 men at work 
on the property, and this force is about to be increased. 

It is to be hoped that there will not 
LABOR CLOUD AT be B renewal of labor troubles it 

GOLDEIELD. Goldfield. Things do not look quite 

so settled as they might be, and the 
issue now raised between the miners and the mine owners regard- 
ing the demand made by the latter that all watchmen should be 

members of the miners' union is apt to raise anothei difficulty 
should it, be pressed on either side. The hope, however, is gen- 
erally expressed that a settlement on a peaceful basis will even- 
tually be effected. In the meantime, the market does nol reflect 

any uneasiness among operators as to the outcome. 



Prosperous N evada 

Mine. 



■ Parental love is a good thing — a type of love we are prone 

to forgive for "slopping over" into foolish infatuation and un- 
reasoning idolatry. But I believe that grown people have rights 
thai children arc bound to respect. As to children being worse 
than they were, children were formerly clubbed into abjei i obedi- 
i ice iimi the reaction buoys them up into the opposite, 
fex the re-action ; anything but a cowed child ! Bui in my judg- 
ment, the hotel keepers who are excludis rom the i 

have much to uphold them. P 
for peace; thai dch paaseth all understanding; that 

peace which the city cannot give. And the result: Every hotel 
IS monopolized by a cohort of yelling young ones, ear 
around the wivainlas, kiting through the halls and turning heaven 
into pandemonium. In the White Mountains there are 
into which for years no one has been admitted with children. 



From his recent talk before a convention of colored peo- 

e inference may be drawn front Senator Foraker's speech 
that tlte time is near at hand when the white man will hi 
yield in all things to the superior intelligence and morals of the 
negroes. The Senator wants to he President of the 1 



An Alameda County woman lias sued her husband for 

: he threatened to shoot her if she 
lor money again to buy milk for the baby. May tlte Lor I 
put it in the hearts of the people to establish the whippin_ 
with a club for a whip. 



g»tar lust 

Not in the real, but in the world that seems, 
Souls meet in beauty, and the spark is passed 
Not all the lire, nl' passion .-.ball outlast. 
The secret hope that semis its struggling beams 
Across the night, with ray familiar gleams 
To some lone heart that long has paid the price 
And reaped the barren gain of sacrifice. 
Above the gloom with which the actual teems 
The soul thoughts flow as limpidly as streams 
That kiss undented shores, and turn again 
To go uncharted and with fateful force 
Along the way of their predestined course. 
It has been willed that evermore shall men 
Come nearest one another in their dreams. 

Mabel Porter Pitts. 



1 am asked, "Why I write against Father Yorke?" Did 

anybody ever ask Yorke why he writes and talks against others? 
Why should he enjoy immunity? Does he fancy his profession 
will protect him? This man has assailed with filthy rancor the 
best people among us. Since his friends, whom his blatant dema- 
goguery helped into office — and jail — have subsided, he has cooled 
oil a little. But he still champions the mob, sanctions the rowdy, 
endorses the rascals. What keeps him here? I should fancy he 
would leave a city and people whose faults are so glaring. The 
fact is, Yorke is a sign-post escaping the troubles of the road he 
points out. What sacrifice is his if the mob hungers. He has 
his three meals a day. If the strikers' wife and children suffer, 
it doesn't imperil his bill of fare. The reverend Peter is one of 
those martyrs who want a crown, but want the other fellow to 
pay for it. As to fighting the Lord's battle, it is the devil's own 
row and Peter is chaplain of his army. 

Schmitz must have lots of fun out of his insistence that 

he is still the Mayor of San Francisco. But there are plenty 
of fellows down at Agnews who have more tun in believing the" 
are kings and Christs. 



SECURITY SAVINGS BANK 

316 MONTGOMERY STREET 
San Francisco, Cal. 

Authorized Capital $1,000,000.00 



Paid Up Capital 

Surplus and Undivided Profits 



500,000.00 
305,000.00 



Interest at 
the rate of 



4 



per cent 
per annum 



was paid on deposits for six months ending June 29, 1907. 

DIRECTORS: WM. BABCOCK, S. L. ABBOTT, O. D. 
BALDWIN, JOSEPH D. GRANT, E. J. McCUTCHEN, L. F- 
MONTEAGLE, R. H. PEASE. WARREN D.CLARK, JAS. L 
FLOOD, J. A. DONOHOE. JOHN PARROTT, JACOB STERN" 

^ t 



Zadig & Co. 

Stock Brokers 



Tonopah, Goldfield, Bullfrog 
Manhattan, Comstock, Fair- 
view and Wonder Stocks 



324 Bash Street, direct!}- opposite the new San Francisc* Stock 
and Exchange Building. \\ r have Installed a private wire con- 
nacting San Francisco with Goldfield. Phona Temporary 1725. 



Burns Hamman Baths 

Ladies' Department 

Open Day and Night 

Phone Franklin 2245 817 Eddy St., S. F. 



20 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 27, 1907. 




Washington Fire of v 3 to ska under the 

management of Mr. A. J. Love, who is s ~;::te In- 

surance Company of Nebraska. 

* * * 

I - ■; surance I ompany an- 

nounces that he will soon resign the presidency of the company 

and retire. 2 - H ife, Mrs. 

C. H. AinJev, he will make his future home in Los Angeles. 

* * * 

The Metropolitan Surety Company, whii nto sudden 

nence in this city r> _ company which 

furnishi a ' the bonds of the principal boi 

has been examined rc-i the author State, 

New York. The result is a surprise — an impairment of over 
sixty-four thousand dollars instead of a surplus was disci 
The directors have decided to put the company on a solve; - - 
by reducing the capital fro i,000, putting the 

difference in the surplus account. The report of the examina- 
tion is thorough, covers every item of the statem 
criticises the company for faulty book-kee ; s - ind in- 

complete and inadequate records. Th . in ob- 

taining the full facts and figun - ssary to a sat - 

animation was caused by these tnadi i irds. It is stated 

that on January 1, 1907, a new - - ; insti- 

tuted, which is believed to be an improvement upon the methods 



formerly in vogue. It was found that the board of directors on 
liber 17th last adopted a resolution declaring a dividend of 
two per cent upon the capital stock, but that no mention of this 
liability was made in the annual report although it was paid 
from! >mpany on January 2, 1907. On March 

15, 1907, another dividend of two per cent was declared which 
was paid on April 2d. The report of the examination closes 
with the explanation that the management of the company wa^ 
■ February IS. 1907. when John J. Caulett retired 
from iresidi ncy, and the Honorable David McClure suc- 

ceeded him. 

* * * 

As an illustration of the care and caution with which fire in- 
surance companies handle losses in the East, and the punishment 
- an attempt to defraud the eompan:.- of the 

Libby, McNeill & Lib" he Union S licago, 

is worth note. The report of the Western Adjustment Company, 
handled the loss charges that the packers concealed and 
iich would have figured in the adjustment, 
tat they denied carrying additional insurance, thereby ba- 
ng the liabilities of the companies admittedly on tb 

- claimed, made a difference id' $50,000 to 
the insurance eompan -. I - -aid the i 

- was adjusted at <1-. 

* * * 

A- .i n -'tit of these findings by the Adjusters, the companies 

ncellations on the plants of this 
linn. This will result in the crippling of the eompan 
Big as it is. since it will leave millions of dollars worth of per- 
ishable property without insurance, and thus deprive the firm 
of one of the most readily used and most valuable collaterals. 
Without insurance, the wheels of even a firm of the magnitude 
of Libby, McNeill & Libby will soon clog. 



San Francisco Bond and Mortgage Co. 






CAPITAL, $10,000,000 



OFFICERS OF THE COMPANY. 

President, JOHN LLOYD; Treasurer, J. DALZEL1 

BROWN: - R1 US P. JENNINGS; 

"ents. DAVID F. WALKER, W. P. PLT..MMER. 
ral Counsel. W. J. BARTNETT, CHARLES W. 
SLACK; General Attorney, M. B. CERF. 

Executive Committee — John Lloyd, J. Dalzell Brown, 
F. Walker. Rufus P. Jennings, B. M. Qunn. 

1 00,000 Shares of the Capital Stock of this Com- 
pany are Offered for Subscription at $ I OO per 
Share. 

- company I . lized t" loan money on in- 

property in >an Francisi n 

. . -Ian. Th - • nee of 

bonds secured by first mortgages "ii income property and 

- - 

An Exceptional Opportunity to Make Money 

There is no investment safer than that offered by the 
SAN FRANCISCO BOND AND MORTGAGE 

PAXY. and owing to the exception' he net 

earnings of its capital slock should considerably exceed 12 

/lit per Ohr 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BOND AND MORTGAGE 
COMPANY has three sources of profit. 

1. Interest earned on its paid-up capital. 

2. Difference between what it earns on mortgages and 
what it pays on bonds, which is usually 1% per cent. 

:;. Difference in interest on guaranteed mortg S 
by it, which is usually 1 per o 

Similar companies in the East and foreign companies 
have had phenomenal success, earning from ~\2 to 16 per 
cent per annum. 

k subscriptions will be received in SAN FRAN- 
CIS* O at the offices of the company. 30 Montgomery 
. and until July 31, 1907. at the following places: 

San Francisco National Bank. Merchants Exchange 
Building. 

The Crocker Nations Bank, Market and Post streets. 

E. II. Pollins & Sons. Kohl Build 

fornia Safe Deposit and Trust Company, at its head 
California street at Montgomery, or at any of its 
four branch offi 

The National Bank of the Pacific < 
Building. 

Portuguese-American Bank. 78 Jackson street. 

State Savings anil I ial Bank, 1019 Fi' 

- 

Union National Bank, Oakland. 

/.• Cit ii — 
I'ni: - • Mortgage and Trust Company. "'"> I 
street. 

Interboro Bank of New York. 49 Wall street. 
E. F. Hutton and Company, 33 New street. 
Write for Book 



July 27, 1907. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



81 



The Journal of Commerce gives the June fire losses .is reach- 
ing the aggregate of $] 1,765,000. This brings up the total fire 
waste for the first half of 1907 to $117,477,800, as compared with 
$377,665,550 for a like portion of the year L906, bui these figui is 

include $380,000,000 chargeable to the conflagration. 

* * * 

With all the increased appropriation made by the lasi Legisla- 
ture to equip the oiTiee of the Insurance Commissioner for the 
more sp< edy transaction of the work of the department, com- 
plaints continually come that it is impossible to get anything 

done. Companies complain that they cannot get the licenses 
needed, and that a request made at the office of the department is 
usually met by the answer that the pressure of business precludes 
any attention just then to any new affairs. 

* * * 

The New England Mutual Life of Boston announces that, 
January 1st, the reserves on all policies issued after that date 
will be on the three per cent basis. 

The American Surety Company denies that it is on the bond 
of the Millikin Brothers, to indemnify the Mexican Government 
for any loss it may sustain through the failure of the contractors 
to finish the erection of a large opera house and a Government 
building in that country. The Millikin firm is among the larger 
American contractors for steel, and recently went into the bands 
of a receiver. 

President Roosevelt's language at the Jamestown Exposition 
advocated strongly the benefits of the laws governing employers' 
liability. The ground taken by the President is, that fixed 
pecuniary compensation for workmen injured in the course of 
their employment will be of the greatest advantage to both em- 
ployer and employee. The insurance men discern in this a 

ans of capturing the sentiment of the union labor vote. They 

claim that the enforcement of the laws would be impractical, 
and in the end would lead to a greai deal of fraud on the part of 
the employees, and that this would he too costly tor the employer. 
The insurance men go farther, and as premise of lb.' business, ar- 
gue that the lii'sl law of nature is self-preservation, and that the 
workingman should he taught to protect his own pecuniary in- 
terest ; \ ia insurance. In this contention, it is pointed out that 

insurance of all kinds and natures can be obtained at a price that 
is within the reach of the poorest that the encouragemenl of this 
sentimonl will lead to thrift on the part of the workingman and 
the opposite result will follow from the paternalism advocated 

by the President. 

* • * 

The West Coast Life Insurance Company of San Francisco 
and the Fidelity Mutual have bolli revived a clean hill of health 
from the hands of Insurance Commissioner Rittenhouse of Colo- 
rado, who recently made an examination of both compani 

lias just made public his findings. 

* * * 

The Oregon Life Insurance Company of Portland. Oregon, 

has been in business for eighl months, and has 80 far made a -o,,,l 
record. It has I -ne million of paid for business 

in the eight months of its career, and the renewals of the business 
fine all bi I frilling lapse ratio. 

* • * 

The Travelers [nsurance Company has n jsued a most 

impei-: maud to it- agents regarding the circulation of 

character not authorized by t 1 
panv. The cause for this action is. that the company has been 
ral unpleasant discussions with rail- 
ami other client^. The principal objection made by the 
inies was the distribution by the local agent? 
of cin riliing accident- on the railroads and the names 

and number of those killed and injured. This is considered 
harmful by the i and the Travelers has fallen into line 

and do not want any a h is inimical to the railroad 

Companies. I: 

mpanv. Tt is a peculiar ruling, .and companies must vary 
a great deal in their judgme-' 

Only recently ;' ragbt with s la s 

line in the S he home 

mpanv full partialis u»d the am 

had ! 
did precisely th doing. 



Fireman's Fund 

INSURANCE COMPANY OF 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



Capital $1,600,000 Assets, $5,772,374.28 

Sansome and California Sts., S. F. 

The Home Insurance Co., New York 

Organized 1S53. Cash Capital, $3,000,000.00 

Insurance on personal effects of tourists and temporary sojourners 
anywhere in United States, Canada and Mexico. Insurance against loss 
by fire, lightning, wind storm or tornado. Indemnity for loss of rental 
income by tire or lightning. 

H. Li. ROFP, General Agent. GEO. M. MITCHELL, Local Manager. 
38 Sutter St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Connecticut Fire Insurance Co. 

Of Hartford. Established 1850. 

Capital $1,000,000.00 

Total Assetts $5,721,433.00 

Surplus to Policy Holders 2,282,186.00 

December 31, 1906. 

518 California St., San Francisco. Cal. 

Benjamin J. Smith, Manager 

Cash Capital, $200,000. Cash Assets, $546,555.61 

Pacitic Coast Gasualty Co. 

of California. 

Employers' Liability, General Liability, Teams, Elevators, Workmen's 
Collective, Vessels, Burglary, Plate Glass Insurance. 

Officers — Edmund F. Green, President; John C. Coleman, Vice-Presi- 
dent; P. A. Zane, Secretary; Ant. Borel & Co., Treasurers; F. P. Deering, 
Counsel. 

Directors — A. Borel, H. E. Bothin, Edward L. Brayton, John C. Cole- 
man, F. P. Deering, E. F. Green. I. W. Hellman, Jr., George A. Pope. 
Henry Rosenfeld, Adolph A. Son. William S. Tevls. 

Head Office — Monad nock Building, San Francisco. Marshal A. Frank 
Company, General Agents for California, Kohl Building, San Francisco. 

Founded A. D. 1792. 

Insurance Go. ot North America 

Philadelphia, Penn. 

Paid-up Capital $3,000,00t 

Surplus to Policyholders 4.042,994.11 

San Francisco Conilagration Losses paid 3,260. 000.(1 

BAILEY & JOHNSTON, General Agents, 

N.E. Corner Pine and Battery streets, San Francisco 

British and Foreign Marine Insurance Co., Ltd 

Of Liverpool. 

Capital $6,700,000 

BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO.. Agents. 
416 Jackson Street. San Francisco. 



Continental Building and Loan Association 

Market and Church Streets, San Franciaco, Gal. 

In Business for 18 Years 



CAPITAL SUBSCRIBED 
CAPITAL PAID IN AND RESERVE 



$15,000,000.00 
- 2,481,317.50 

4 pei cent, paid on ordinary deposits 6 per cent paid on term deposits. Interest paid o n de- 
posits since organization over $2,500,000.00. Call or write a I any time. Always gjad to 
answer questions. 

Washington. Dodge, President JoMph O !"■■■ flail. M P , *nd Vic* Pi 

Junes XeCallcgh. 1st TIN President Oarin Xclfab Attorney 

William fill Mil. S*c"j and 0«a'l Manager 



PACIFIC TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY 

Capital $500,000 

F. G. Drum, President Murry F. Vandal. , Manager 



TITLES EXAMINED AND INSURED 



420 Montgomery Street 

San Francisco - - California 



22 




SAN FRANCISCO MEWS LETTER 



July 27, 1907. 



MOBILE 



JTL 



San Francisco's women enthusiasts of the Automobile Club of 
California, of which Mrs. Linz is the moving spirit, met at the 
office of Mrs. A. E. Krebs, \ ice-president of the club, in the Kohl 
Building, last week, to discuss the glories of the San Jose ran; 

The club will be incorporated, and after this is done, there will 

be an initiation Fee for new members. A club emblem will be 

adopted in the near future, and something much more artistic 

than the present badge is to be adopted. 

* * * 

It was decided to have a city run for the members next Wed- 
nesday. Owners of automobiles will take non-owners out for 
the day. Luncheon will be served at the beach. The next out 
of town run will probably take place about September 1st. The 
members will be guests of Mrs. tvrebs at her new summer home, 
which is nearing completion at Fair Oaks. 

Five new members were taken into the club, and a new board 
of directors was elected, as follows: Mrs. Robert Christie, chair- 
man. Mrs. Dr. Healy, Mrs. James Ettiene. It was decided to ap- 
point a committee on membership to pass upon all applications. 

A vote of thanks was extended to J. A. Snead. who had lent 

his big Stearns car to the club for the run to San Jose. The 

ote included I.. H. Bill, of Thomas B. Jeffery & Co., for 

the Ramblers; Max Rosenfeld for the Auto Livery Company's 

--. and H. W. Wilbur, for the Lambert. 

The club will meet hereafter on the second Wednesday of each 
month in the office of Mrs. Krebs, until the new home of the 
California Club is completed, when the auto club will have quar- 
ters in that building. 



Cadillac- Packard 

All that is best in motor car construction 




At DEL MONTE Jul; 4lh, the five mile race for Touring 
Cars 24 horae power and over, A PACKARD which had been 
in daily use (or one year was entered by its owner and de- 
feated the following GARS: Pierce Great Arrow, Stearos, 
Stadebaker, Peerless, Apperson, Stevens Duryea Big 6. 



GUYLER LEE, 



453 Golden Gate Avenue 



San Francisco, Gal. 



'II (Beers of the Automobile Club arc in conference with the 

officers of the I > • 1 Monte track. They are trying to Bcheme - 

way by which the track can be turned into one thai will be for 
the use of the automobilist exclusively. The track has proven 
to be fast, and with a few improvements should lie one of the 
Fastest mile automobile tracks in the world. 

Mrs. A. E. Kreb,-. vice-president of the California Women's 
Automobile Club, was across the bay this last week-end, and 

made a number of trips through Alameda County it) her White 
steamer. 






rj 33ve^ 1907 



"The&esljulomobile" 




Price $4500 FOB Cleveland. 5 Passenger 

The Stearns flexibility of motor is the greatest of any car. Besides being a most powerful car, the Stearns is one of the most 
durable machine* built. 

STEARNS cars are designed by engineers, built by mechanics, tested by experts and consequently operated with satisfaction 
by their users. We invite your careful investigation and comparison, confident that we will profit thereby. 

THESE ARE FACTS TBAT WE WANT TO DEMONSTRATE TO IOC 

ih.ru- Franklin 3008 

California-Nevada Automobile Company, 368 Golden Gate Avenue 

SAN FRANCISCO 



There is to be a run to Lake County un- 
der the combined auspices of the Auto- 
mobile Dealers' Association and the Au- 
tomobile Club of California. 'This is now 
under consideration by Chairman Watson 
of the Buns and Tours Committee, and 
Fred Linz. of the Automobile Dealers' As- 
sociation. 

* * * 

The fifth perfect score made h\ the 
Winton model M in as many weeks was 

won in the Boston-Keene contest of July 
(itb. Five perfect scores in five consecu- 
tive starts is a new world's record for 
reliability. 

A rumor in the Fast, to the ell'ect thai 
Charles B. Shanks had resigned as gen- 
eral sales manager of the Winton Motor 
Carriage Company, came as news to both 
the Winton Company and Mr. Shanks. 
Nothing to it. 

Mr. and Mrs. II. S. Morton and pari- 
of friends have jusl returned from Lake 

County, where ibei have been touring iu 

their new model A Oldsmobile for the 

past two weeks. 

* * * 

Mr. P. W. Durner is now the proud pos- 
sessor of a 60 horsepower Thomas Flyer. 
which he last week purchased from the 

Pioneer Automobile Company. 

* * * 

Mr. and Mrs. C. W. Frank and party 
made a trip around the hay on Sunday 
in their Thomas Flyer. 
*" * * 

Mr. E. A. Sherman left this city las; 
Friday for a trip to Los Angeles in his 
model A Oldsmobile. Mr. Sherman will 
remain in Fes Angeles for a wei l> or ten 
days, after which be will tour to other. 
Southern points of interest, 



July 27, 1907. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



83 



The attention of the local automobilists is centered al the 
presi on the ran up to Lake County, which will take 

'. .i week Erom to-day. The officers of the Automobile Club 
and the Dealers' Association are trying to combine the two events 
igrammed for this pari oi the State and run them off at the 
ae time. If this is done, the Automobile Club will offer sev- 
eral cups for the event. 

* * » 

The Automobile Club of California should clear up the con- 
dition of affairs in Napa County. The allowing of county offi- 
cials to hold up the automobilists and prohibit them from going- 
over certain roads is in direct conflict with the automobile law 
of the State. The Automobile Club is responsible for the good 
automobile law, and has downed all opposition. This is one of 
the chief reasons why every automobilist should be a member of 
the club, but if the members of the club have to wait as long os 
they are doing at the present time to get relief, the club is lack- 
ing in force, or else has a harder nut to crack than has been 
handed to it heretofore. What is needed is swift action by the 
attorneys who are handling the case. 

* * * 

H. S. Doming, the Santa Cruz banker, was in San Francisco 
yesterday, after coming up from the Seaside City in his White 
car, and left again for a long tour of Napa, Humboldt and other 
northern counties, accompanied by his little daughter. 

At a recent two-day race meet held in Chicago, White steamers 
were barred by the committee from participating in any of the 
events. The White Company has therefore challenged the winner 
of the 24 hour pace to a similar contest. Barring of WJiites is 

causing considerable discussion throughout the East. 

* * * 

Automobile Notes. 

L. P. Lowe, of San Francisco, president of the California 
State Automobile Association, came, to Santa Cruz last Sunday 
in his big Mercedes, and with Mr. F. W. S wanton, manager of 
the Santa Cruz Beach Cottage and Tent City Corporation, went 
over the route for the proposed automobile endurance run to be 
held here in the latter part of September. It is the purpose of 
the State Association to establish a yearly meet to be held in 
Santa Cruz each September, and to licit end the roads of the 
city and county are to be improved and put in first class condi- 
tion for motoring. The run will be one of 150 miles — 10 laps 
over the 15-mile circuit. On that day the entire route will be 
patroled by special mounts, and kept free from all other travel 
during the hours of the run, tints minimizing the likelihood of 
accidents. 

* * * 

Messrs. l'olhcnius, chairman of the Santa Clara and San Jose 

Automobile Club. Daniels of the Vendome, and Ernesl Leon 
of San Jose, were in Santa Cruz last Sunda\ completing arrange- 
ments for the auto run from San Jose to Santa Cruz, to be held 
Saturday, duly 87th. It is estimated that 75 machines will 
make the run. 

* * * 

Mrs. Knox, of Oakland, was in Santa Cruz recently driving 
a splendid White landaulet 'litis enthusiastic motorist made 
an extensive i of Santa Cntz and Monterej counties and was 

immensely pleased with the scenery and climate of the Santa 

Cruz Mountains. 

* * * 

ornia have been making local auto- 
mobile laws that arc in direct conflict with the State law. and 
bile club is now teaching the rural motor- 
ics thai there are limits to their powers. An attorney has 
been engaged, who Erom county to county lighting or- 

dinances thai attempt to overstep the S :tes. 

* * * 

\ I, red by the \ from Canton. Ohio, gives 

an idea of the eventful trip of those partaking in the Glidden 

tour. Tt is as folio S _ ■ was 

ble for a good many aching heads litis morn:' g 

ir hroakfa- ighth 
dav's run. which is to Pittsburg. Only sixty-three cars are in the 

caravan to-day, the 1 iven 
by A. A. Hous it of the lis 

former may be. Th - run 

Bat. While th dy a little over one 

hundred miles, (hi • I harder than any yet en- 




I h» 



LEGITIMATELY HIGH PRICED 

DEMONSTRATION BY APPOINTMENT 

LOZIER AUTO AGENCY, 

132 Valencia St.. San Francisco 



3000 




Cars sold in 1 2 months 

We sold in California 346. 

We have pleased all these customers. 

We can please you. 

Thomas B. Jeffery &. Co. 

117-125 Valencia St., San Francisco 

Factory--Kenosh, Wisconsin. 



countered on a al oi the mat 1 the presence of a 

ile number of water b '.- he hills. 

At the Courtland Hotel here to-day there was a pretty general 

[airman was told by several 
of the Qliddenites thai he had handed imon of the finest 

golden hue. The rooms ■■ and did not warrant the 

Broatlv. which were cha 

• • * 

rdav's run from Columbus was full its. The Wal- 

ter car of Lea plunged over a twenty-foot embanknx 

id with th inning an s rs un- 

hurt, was pulled back to the road and came in time to I 

to a clean s 

* * » 

of Buffalo broke a front spring and was abo 

hmr and a half late getting into Canton. 'I : d the 

>f the Buffalo club. Leaving th in the 

lead it. Lid not 

produce an -t night. may visiting 

Pike in an lark. The • ike. If 

it were not kept their 

own informal' .11. 



MOLINE ROADSTERS 

At the Crescent Garage, corner of cTVIcAllister and Gough 
streets one may buy a Moline Rjoadster, 4-cylinder. 20 horse- 
power for $1950 t o. b. Immediate delivery. 



24 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 27, 1907. 



J. TV. Long, owner of the Long Syrup 
Co., of San Francisco, has just received 
his new White Pullman, and went on a 
trip to Monterey yesterday. The auto « ill 
be used for both business and pleasure. 
Fred Long is the chauffeur of the family, 
and after one lesson took the ear for a 

spin about town. 

* * * 

W. Westover, of Alameda, left in his 
White steamer last week for a tour 
through the northern counties, lb' ex- 
pects to lir away aboul five weeks. 

* * * 

Mrs. Enox, one of Oakland's mosl de- 
voted automobilists, has returned from an 
extended trip through Santa Cruz ami 
Monterey Counties, in her White steamer, 
which is of the landaulet type. The fair 
motorist enjoyed the scenery immensely 
while traveling over the Santa Cruz 
Mountains. No mishaps occurred to mar 

the pleasure of the trip. 

* * * 

II. ('. Olsen. a prominent motorist of 
Oakland, returned recently From .an ex- 
tensive tour through Monterey County 

with his White steamer. He drove back 
from Jolon, a distance of over 200 mile-. 
in thirteen hours, including several stops 

anil Kin halt for gasoline. Asked if 

he had any mishaps on the return trip. Ol- 
sen remarked: "No, I don't know what 
thev are; all I can say is, we came home 
like a scared rabbit." The party included 
— besides Olsen — his wife ami Mr. and 
Mrs. Ariel They motored down by way 
of Salinas and Soledad. and report the 
roads fairly good around Salinas, but 
came upon a Bandy stretch of about five 
miles near King's City which Olsen said it 
took all one could do to steer the machine 
through. The autoists started out equipped 
with baggage, guns and plenty of ammu- 
nition, and went hunting and fishing on 
the Newhall ranch. Olsen claims the dis- 
tinction of having shot more rabbits than 
the rest of the party, and it was an evil 
moment when the "jacks" came in front 
of his sure shot. 

After relating his trip. Olsen took oc- 
casion to speak of the success he has had 
since taking up the sport. A novice at the 
game, he purchased a White touring cat 
in 190."). and said yesterday that be lew 
run the car exactly two years and two 
months to date, and has never bad to put 
it in the shop once. With such a record, 
it is small wonder that he has become an 
ardent devotee of the horseless carriage. 

Vatican circles have been stirred by tic 

fact that the papale Secretary of Slate. 
Cardinal Merry del Val. has bought a 
powerful automobile. The suitability of 
at least one mike of American motor car 
for his superior will at once occur to those 
familiar with trade names on this side. 

Four Winton cars, driven by Messrs. 
Blakeslee, Gate-. Kelly and Brown, have 
iii-i completed a 700 mile run from Cleve- 
land to Watkins Glens, \ T . Y. The trip 
was thoroughly delightful, being barren 
of accidents or mishaps. Mi'. Blakeslee 
joined the tour at the end of an Eastern 
trip of one thousand miles, during which 
his 1904 Winton proved itself equal to mil 
of the. best cars of recent production. 



Mackay Cure for Alcoholism 

SUREST, SAFEST, SHORTEST 

The Only Cure Adopted by Any Government. Strongly 
recommended by His Grace, the Archbishop of Quebec, 
and scores of scientific and philanthropic author- 
ities. Home Treatment, no publicity nor deten- 
tion from business ; no opium nor hypodermic. 
It cures, that's aU. Sanitarium for special cases. 

Correspondence strictly confidential and in plain sealed envelopes. 
MACKAY TREATMENT CO. 

Write Department 7 , 61 Maiden Lane, New York. 



BUICK 



2 CYLINDER CARS 

made a sensational showing at the Santa Rosa races, winning 
six out if eight events. All against cars gf double the price and 
power gf the Buick. 

Cars in stock for immediate delivery". 

4-Cylinder Touring Cars $2050.00 

2- " " " 1400.00 

2- " Runabouts 1250.00 

HOWARD AUTO CO., 

PHONE FRANKLIN 2034 404-406 GOLDEN GATE AVE 



IRVIN SILVERBERG 



CHAS. S. MITCHELL 



THE IRVIN MACHINE WORKS 

Best Automobile Repair Shop West of Chicago 
General Machine Work and Gear Cutting 

Our automobile repair department la equipped with the finest up-to-date 
machinery. The unusual size and consequent steady work enables us to 
employ specialists Instead of expecting our mechanics to be jack-of-all 
trades. Moreover, we can furnish In advance to owners exact estimates 
on cost of any repairs they may contemplate. 

Phone Market 2366. 335-337 Golden Gate Ave. San Francisco 



jtft&ellz Runabout 



4 CYLINDER 
16-18 HORSEPOWER 
90-INCH WHEELBASE 
30x3 1-2 INCH TIRES. 
PRICE $1150 



OSEN & HUNTER AUTO COMPANY 



407 Golden Gate Avenue. 



Phone Market 2723. 



USE MAYERLE'S EYEWATER 




boforo exposing your cyc» to «trong wind, dual, light or «ud. It in n perfoctly haruile-s* and effec- 
tive preparation. Guaranteed under the 0, S. Drugs Act, June 30th. 'Oft, Serial No. 7370. Mr. 
CIim. Crow, euro of \v. w Montague ft Co.. Pipo Shop, mijr: "i have bean troubled « Ito 

fur a number >->f yeara t tried a bottle oi "TOIM Eyawater and find >( <■ the best Eyewater I ever 
uaed. and would not be without it in the house. - * Highly rocommended tor weak eyo». poor 
•.lghi. Borocycs. clondtuoei of rielon, floating ipota, pain anonl the >-ye», behind the bead <>r In 
tottplet, watery ..r di -.charging ijea, feeling like mud in the eyes, burninjj. imartlng, itching, 
scratching, twitching glney eyes, heavy ayolidj and other eye troubles, Pervone having I 

■Itlve eyei exposed to the strong Light, duel wind or sun can gel InaUnt relief bj nefng m ii 

Byowator BEWARE 01 INJURIOUS IMITATIONS Take D o lubstltal I 
rer on* do»n bottles. t& 00. Hayorle'e Antiseptic Eyeglass Wipe uu I when 

tiro or "train the eyas, 'J for 2oo, No glasses leave George Mayorle'N Optical Enitlttuto unless ab- 
solutely correct. Address »ll comma n! cations to George Hayerle, i 140 Golden Gate arenas San 
Francisco, near \VpI.*Ut I ■ . i m this .>ui 



J i i.y 27, 190, 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



25 



One of the greatest achievements ever recorded ahroad by an 
American automobile was the winning of the liill climb, at South 
Harting, in England, last week, by a Wliite steam car. The vic- 
lae been the talk on the continent the pasl few days, and 
the White Company al Cleveland, Ohio, has received messages of 
congratulations from all parts of the globe. The American 
machine, which was of the standard model "G" touring type, was 
rated in the event at 50 horsepower, but despite this fact, con- 
quered over fifty automobiles, among them some of the best of 

the foreign- de cars. News of the great win was conveyed to 

San Francisco in the following telegram: "Biggest hill climb 
nl' the year in England won by Standard Model "'(i" While 
touring car at Smith Harting yesterday, capturing Yellow Chal- 
lenge trophy, value £250; also geld medal in raee and sweep- 
stake. All in spite of being rated as a fifty horse-power ear, 
and in competition with fifty-five entries, including sixty Napier, 
sixty De Dietrich, sixty Berliet, fifty Minerva, two forty-five 
Daimlers, two thirty-five Daimlers, and every fast English ear.'' 



THE REFORM EB. 



The reformer is over-rated. His "sacrifices" are rubbish. 
There never was a regulator who didn't turn out to be a con- 
spicuous failure himself before he found time to straighten out 
others. This specimen is useful, but he deserves no credit. He 
has soured on humanity, and disagrees because nobody and noth- 
ing agrees with him. He is a moral and mental dyspeptic, and 
opposes, not because the opposed are wrong, but because he is 
one-third failure, one-third misanthrope, one-third affectation, 
and three-thirds nothing else to do. Every man who accom- 
plished the extraordinary first failed in the ordinary. 

The best way to choke off the reformer is to treat him with in- 
difference; notice stimulates. Fanaticism is never lacking in 
this person, and the reformer who fights bigotry with toleration 
never lived. Look at the Socialist. Did you ever see a Social- 
ist who could discuss Socialism calmly? Ever see one who knows 
what Socialism is? Ever see one who didn't get mad if you 
asked him what it is? The last one I argued with got up on his 

ear because I called him "a d n fool," and tried to prove 

be wasn't. 



DYSPEPSIA is UNKNOWN. 

In tin' civilized world there is no class of people more blessed 
with healthy digestive organs than the Hawaiian. Dyspepsia IS 
entirely unheard of. One reason for this is thai a staple article 
of food of the islanders is poi, and tare llonr. which is made Erom 
the roots of a species of pom] lily that grows in the small streani- 

and fresh marshes, 'fins root is verj nourishing when made 

into Hour; one pound of d has more nutrition than ten pounds 
of . hi r wheat Hour. As a tissue builder and brain food it is 
Without an equal. The best poi and Hawaiian flour manufac- 
tured in the Hawaiian Islands to-day is Lutted's. Heretofore ' 

has heen difficult for those .who appreciate the good qualities of 

this food lo obtain il without sending direct to Hawaii, but now 

it may be bought m San Ifrancisco in generous-sized packages 
at a moderate price. 



IT MAKES THE BABY STRONG. 

Good milk contains in the most easily digested form all the elements 
arj t" tin- building of bone, Qesh ana 
Brand Condensed Milk has raised three generations of strong and healthy 
babies Has no equal as a baby to 



18 REAPIXG .l.Y EFFORT? 
We can make it a pleasure for you. Hirsch & Kaiser, opticians, 
1757 Fillmore street, San Francisco. 





RAINIER 


35 h. 


p. Make and Break with Simms-Bosch Magneto. 

The Pullman of Motor Cars 


428 Golden 


Guaranteed free of repairs for one year. 

HAYES 4 DAM, 
Gate Avenue. San Francisco 



Old Poodle Dog Restaurant 



824-826 Eddy St.. near Van Ness Ave. 
cor. Grant Avenue. Phone Franklin 63. 



Formerly at Bush St., 



1907 PREMIER 



The Quality 
Car 



^ 



Touring Gar and Touring 
Runabout, 112400. 24-28 H. 
P, 4-cyIioder water cooled 
selective type, sliding gear 
transmission. 

E. P. SLOSSON, Agent 
Northern California 

GOLDEN GATE GARAGE 
Fell and Ashbury Streets San Francisco Phone West 6885 




GEO. P. MOORE CO., Inc. 

AUTOMOBILE SPECIALTIES 



Headquarters for Imported Novelties, Domestic Necessities and 
Local Courtesy combined with Fair Dealing. 



Branch — 1005 South Main St., Los Angeles. 
Branch— 231-233 Twelfth St., Oakland. 



721 Golden Gate Avenue, San Francisco 



SECOND HAND 
Automobiles 

BOUGHT. SOLD, EXCHANGED. Largest Mock In the West R. II. 
MORRIS, Anto Broker, 1818-20 Telegraph Are., Oakland, Gal. Established 
1901. 



VULCANIZING 

Stevens & Elkington Rubber Co. 

Phone Franklin 612 



524 Polk St. near Golden Gate Ave. 



San Francisco, Cal. 



Electric Lamps, Bells, and Telephones 

SUPPLIES DYNAMOS 



MOTORS 



REPAIRS 



CENTURY ELECTRIC CONSTRUCTION CO. 
18 Fell St., near Market. San Francisco 



KEENAN BROS. 

Automobile Engineers, Machinists and Blacksmiths. , 
273 Valencia street, San Francisco. Telephone Market 1985. 



TIPS TO AUTOMOBILISTS 

14-MILE HOUSE— "t"ncle Tom's Cabin" Automobile Supplies and re- 
pair shop. First-class accommodations. Cuisine unsurpassed on the 
Coast. "Andy." formerly of the "Cliff House." 

PALO ALTO— Corbaley & Thorpe Auto Co.. Renting, repairing and 
sundries. Fire-proof garage. Day and night service. 443-9 Emerson St. 
Telephone Main 78. 



SAN JOSE — Reo & Stoddard- 1 >ayton owners stop at Harrison P. 
Smith's garage. First and San Carlos streets. Motor car supplies and 

repairs. __^_ 

SAN JOSE— Lamolle Grill. 36-3S North First street. The best French 
dinner in California 76c. or a la carte. Automobile parties given par- 
ticular attention. 



GILROT. CAL— Geo. E. Tice. general machinist, expert repairing of 
automobiles and engines a specialty. Day or night service. 260 N Mon- 
terey street. 

SALINAS. CAL— Hotel Bardin. Rates »2 per day and up. French chef. 
Best accommodations. Roads excellent G. Lapierre. Prop. 



26 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 27, 1907. 



®ht (®lb nnb % £fow Hitting Uest 



By I he Sradcrfool 



The forces which operate for the extinction of the old West 
arc now advancing from both East and West. The State of 
Nevada, lying between the effete East and imperial California, 
is the last refuge of the old-time life and old-lime traditions. 

Reno, the largest town in the State, is the abode of the rem- 
nant of the okl-time gamblers and sharps that once infested 
California. Saloons, grottoes and grills are numerous. Cordial 
invitations to both ladies and gentlemen to imbibe beer by the 
glass, bottle or barrel stare one in the face everywhere. The 
gambling hells which line the main streets are crowded with 
the usual variety of humanity. The railroad grader, begrimed 
and dirty, who has accumulated a few dollars working on the 
Western Pacific, is here ready for harvest. The harvester, a 
smooth-shaven, shi fly-eyed, be-diamonded individual of early 
middle age, is also here; and the truth of the Scripture, "From, 
him that hath not shall be taken away even that which he hath," 
was never more plainly exemplified. The poor sucker invariably 
arises broke. The impassive dealer hands him a check entitling 
him to a drink at the bar, which he takes, and passes out of the 
dazzling glare of the electrics into the starry night. A restau- 
rant is attached, which serves a meal that in variety and excel- 
lence cannot be beaten in San Francisco. The male portion of 
this sage brush metropolis is consumed with a devouring thirst. 
As there is probably not one of them who is not continually 
violating one or another of the Commandments, it is presumed 
that they are laying up a supply for an eternity of drought. 
The old town, famous in history, was never more prosperous, 
and money is being spent with an abandon that indicates a 
knowledge of the existence of more than is accessible. 

Leaving Reno on the railroad, the train speedily enters the 
desert. A vast plain, flanked on either side by a giant mountain 
range and level as a billiard table for the most part, confronts 
the eye everywhere. The appalling desolation of the landscape 
grows upon the city bred man. Not a trace of lite can be seen. 
For over two hundred miles not a tree is visible, not a blade of 
vegetation, with the exception of a species of stunted desert 
s-hrub, the ''.Joshua"' tree, '.hat seemingly exists without moisture. 

The twin ranges of mountains, forbidding yet tragically im- 
pressive in their nakedness of outline, are fairly kaleidoscopic 
wiih color. One peak will resemble a huge pile of coke, another 
a vast mass of yellow ochre, and another will exhibit a limestone 
whiteness until almost all the primal colors are represented. At 
intervals, portions of the desert resemble a saucepan of molasses 
candy that has been suddenly cooled. Excrescences like huge 
bubbles are jumbled together in inextricable confusion. For 
the most part, however, the dead level plain abutts sheer up 
against the mountains, which rise up abrupt and precipitous. 
The long line of telegraph poles stretch into infinity in a waste 
■ if sand, which is succeeded by a pebbly formation, which in its 
turn gives place to a white alkaline flour that stifles the visitor. 
'I'lii- tremendous territory, while rich in mineral wealth, is ac- 
cursed by nature. Death is written on its surface everywhere. 
Tin' sole invader — man — exists only by reason of knowledge, 
and he is a pathetic Bpectacle. 

Occasionally, in the waste of desolation, a small shack ap- 
pears by (he railroad, .mil a tanned white woman may be seen 
peering at the train while a couple of children cling to her 
skiii-. She is the wife of some railroad employee or prospec- 
tor, and the rough board cabin is her sole refuge from the mol- 
ten rays of the sun. One's thoughts involuntarily revert to the 
dilettante lady of fashion and refinement brought up in the lap 
of luxury, and the contrast almost suggests that the difference is 
one of species and not of degree. The woman who lives in the 
desert is a heroine indeed, a living self-sacrifice, anil a pattern 
of dauntless courage which the prospector, brave though he be, 
can never approach. a. a. h. 



LIQUEUR. 



POST AND LEAVENWORTH 

Becomes famous, since it is the location of the Little Palace 
Hotel. The grill is the great drawing card as it was in the old 
days. 



PERES CHARTREUX 



-GREEN AND YELLOW- 




SSWP-JSSXEEBCTS^ 3 



Liqueur 

"■■uouu ^Bk ■tajbw*' 

Peres ehartrem 

^•■MjrijjmAiiJL^ 



The After-Dinner Liqueur 
of Refined Taste 



At first-class Wine Merchants. Grocers. Hotels. Cafes, 

Batjer & Co.. 46 Broadway. New York, N. Y. 

Sole Agents for United States. 



SOMETHING NEW 

MORAGHAN'S 

RESTAURANT AND BUFFET 

24-26 ELLIS STREET, NEAR. MARKET 



Member Stock and Bond Exchange. 

fvl ember San Francisco Mining Exchange. 

J. C. WILSON, Broker 

STOCKS AND B,0 N D S 
INVESTMENT SECURITIES 

488 California St., San Francisco. 
Telephone. Temporary 815. KOHL BUILDING. 



OVR STANDARDS 



Sperrys Beat Family. 

Drifted Snow. 
I Golden Gate Extra.. 



iS perry Flour Company 



.Tuly 27, 1907. 



AXD CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



37 




THE ANSWER. 

Thou bidst me tell the reason why 

I love thee, sweet. 
First ask the dawn, with opal sky, 

Why morning meet. 
Then ask the violet, dew be-pearled, 

Why fragrance shed; 
And ask the rose, with petals furled, 

Wlhy blossom red. 

Ask why morn's mists melt over you 

While star-shine fades; 
Why rose-pink heav'n breaks into blue 

And azure shades; 
Why daisies peep from grass-green beds, 

Where'er you go, 
While clovers nod their dainty heads, 

And perfume blow. 

The quiet eve its heart-peace brings. 

Dost question still? 
A distant night-bird softly sings 

Its loving trill. 
While gentle winds thy cheeks would kiss, 

I answer give, 
'Tis this alone, my sweet, 'tis this : 

God lets me live ! 

— Kaihryn D. Boyns. 

LOVE DIED LAST NIGHT. 

Love died last night. His lips, once curved in smiles. 

Were trouble-lined, and to his tear-wet eyes 

Came the hurt look of one who. Laughter-wise, 
First looks at Paiu. Love died to, through the Aisles 
Of Dead Emotions, tread the weary miles 

To where the Empire of Oblivion lies. 

My heart and soul tolled out his sad demise, 
Then drew their cowls and fared away — exiles! 

There by his bier the ghost of Laughter stood. 
And with the mourning group came Memory, 
Her angel wings poised for a gentle flight: 
But none was there to say Love was not good. 

. Vint none was there who went away tear-free — 

For love, who knew no wrong — Love dktd last night! 
— Stacsy E. Baker in New England Maga 



EARTH-WEARV. 



Pale brow too white for traceries of pain. 
Frail hands too soft for this world's thorn and rue. 
Unearthly eves beneath whose drooping lids 
There lay too much of heaven shining through. 

Tale, weary feet that strive to keep the road, 
But longed across the poppy fields to roam ; 
Then God Looked down — saw anguish in her eyes. 
And through a poppied sunset led her home. 

— Archibald Sullivan in Appleton's. 



BAS-RBLIEF8. 

The trees against the sky-line 
\ panelled, like a 

ender, standing figures; 
A sculpture from the past : 
Silent, vol singing, clustered, still, 
The Delia Robbia of the hill. 
— htibella ffows Fiak* in Neic England Mag. 



Pacific Coast Branch 
JAMES BUCHANAN C& CO., Ltd. 

LONDON 

People of Refinement and Wine Intelligence 
ask for and drink PERRIER JOUET CHAM- 
PAGNE. Treat yourselves kindly and ask 
for (Blue Top.) 

VARNEI W. GASKILL, Pacific Coast Manager, 

Oakland, Cal. 



BANKING 



Tin Canadian Bank of Commerce 

With which are amalgamated the Bank of British Columbia, the Halifax 
Banking Co. and the Merchants' Bank of Prince Edward Island 
HEAD OFFICE— TORONTO. 

Paid-up Capital $10,000,000. Reserve Fund $5,000,000 

_ „ Aggregate Resources, over $113,000,000 

B. E. WALKER President ALEX LAIRD, General Manager 

LONDON OFFICE— 60 Lombard St., 1_. C. 
NEW YORK OFFICE— 16 Exchange Place. 
BRANCHES IN BRITISH COLUMBIA— Atlln, Cranbrook, Fernie 
Greenwood, Kamloops, Ladysmith, Nanaimo, Nelson, New Westminster 
Pentlcton, Prince Rupert, Princeton, Vancouver (3), and Victoria 
IUKON TERRITORY— Dawson and White Horse. 
UNITED STATES— Portland, Seattle and Skagway (Alaska.) 
OTHER BRANCHES— Alberta, 26; Saskatchewan, 18; Manitoba, 20; 
Ontario and Quebec, 62; Maritime Provinces, 19. 

, BANKERS IN LONDON— The Bank of England, The Bank of Scot- 
ia. M'ffi S.Wj JiQj. The Union of London, and Smith's Bank Ltd. 
AGENTS IN CHICAGO— The First National Bank. 
= ?S N TS IN NEW ORLEANS— The Commercial National Bank. 
SAN FRANCISCO— Main ornce, 326 California St. Branch— Cor. Van 
Ness and Eddy. 

A. KAINS, Manager. BRUCE HEATHCOTE, Asst. Manager. 

Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco 

Building at 706 Market St., Opposite Third. 

G ,YfJit£ te M9n C X lta1 ' J 1 ' 000 ' 000 Paid-up Capital, $300,000 

surplus, $420,000. Assets, $10,000,000 

James D.Phelan, President; John A. Hooper, First Vice-President; 
Tames K. Moffltt, Second Vice-President; George A. Story, Cashier; C 

B. Hobjon . Aral. Cashier; A. E. Cura'i, 2nd. Am. Cuhier. 

Directors— James D. Phelan, John A. Hooper, JamesK. Moffltt. Frank 
J. bulllvan, Robert McElroy, Rudolph Spreckels, Charles Holbrook. 

Interest paid on deposits. Loans on approved securities. Deposits may 
be sent by postal order. Wells, Fargo & Co., or exchange on city bankB. 



The Anglo-Californian Bank, Limited 



Head Office — 18 Austin Friars, London, E. C. 
Capital Authorized. $6,000,000 Pald-un 11 600 00» 

Subscribed, $3,000,000 Reserve Fund, ^ooiooo 

The bank transacts a general banking business, sells drafts, makes 
telegraphic transfers, and Issues letters of credit available throughout 
the world. Sends bills for collection, loans money, buys and sells ex- 
change and bullion. 
IGN STEINHART, P. N. LILIENTHAL. Managers. 
. FRIEDLANDER. Cashier. 



Central Trust Company of California 



42 Montgomery Street, Corner Sutter. 
Assets. $6,000,000 Paid-up Capital and Reserve. $1,760,000 

Authorized to act as Executor. Administrator. Guardian or Trustee 
Check accounts solicited. Legal depository for money In Probate Court 
proceedings. Interest paid on Savings Accounts at 3 6-10 per cent per 
annum. " 



London, Paris and American Bank, Ltd. 



N. W. COR. SANSOME AND SUTTER STS. 

Subscribed Capital, $2,600,000. Paid-up Capital. $2 000 000 

Reserve Fund. $1,200,000. 

___ Head Office — 40 Threadneedle St., London, E. C. 

AGENTS— New York— Agency of the London. Paris and American 

? an , k ' ¥j™U e<1, No ' 10 Wa " »'"«• N - T-i Paris— Messrs. Lazard Freres 

& Cle, 17 Boulevard Polssonler. Draw direct on the principal cities of 

the world. Commercial and Travelers' credits Issued. 

S. Gieeoebaum I .. 

H. FIeuhh.cker I ™"i 

R. Al»chul, Cuhier 



The German Savings & Loan Society 



526 California St.. San Francisco, Cal. 

iluaranteed Capital and Surplus $2 603 755 68 

t'.ipltal actually paid up in cash " 1000000 00 

I'eposlts. June 29. 1907 381156I93L28 

Officers— President. F. Tillmann. Jr.; First Vice-President, Daniel 
Meyer; Second VicePresldent. Emll Rohte: Cashier. A. H. R. Schmidt; 
Assistant Cashier. William Herrmann: Secretory, G*orge Tourny; Assist- 
retaiy. A. H. Muller: Goodfellow & Eells. General Attorneys. 

Board of Directors— F. Tillmann. Jr.; Daniel Meyer. Emil Rohte. Ign. 
Steinhut, I. N. Walter. N. Ohlandt. J. W. Van Bergen. E. T. Kruse and 
V\ . S. Goodfellow. 



GOODYEAR. RUBBER COMPANY 

ft H. PEASE, PresMMl 

H.t* Relumed to Their Old Hot. Where TUy Were Locied Before the Fire 

573-579 Market. Street-, near Second 

Tel. Temporirjr 1 788 



28 



SAN FRANCISCO MEWS LETTER 



July 27, 1907. 




LOOKER ON 

t'V Eli M l lOf. l ' ■ ■ '■ ' ' '■' . 1 ' I I I ' ii '.i ' .'".t^". ■ , " l m i "-W ,i ; -i"u ' . * ,' 



ifi'Ar. J - -iVi -*--.i',.';- .'rl'i i , ' V V 




We often hear Bomebody say that everybody is more or Jess in- 
sane. Every age has its standard of sanity; each epoch laughs 
at the conclusions of its predecessors. Newton pinned his faith 
to the "emission theory." He thought and taught that sight 
was the ray.- of light from the '/ye impinging on the object. We 
laugh at Newton and escape lilt-- imputation of insanity, not so 
much because we arc right but because our view is the view .it 
the age. The most cherished theories of yesterday are the ex- 
ploded absurdities of to-day. 

What is more commonly heard than: "No man can make a 
million dollars honestly." But those who know he can't make a 
million honestly don't, know how much he can make honestly. 
But they are satisfied that they can make any wages honestly. 
The coolest judgment is swayed by self-interest, and the man 
who listens to another whose reason is warped hy selfishness is a 
fool. 1 find that about the time I am convinced of the truth of 
something) it lias been repudiated for something more difficult 
to believe. What does this teach us? Duly this: that the only 
; .I- capable of permanent demonstration are mathematics, 

* * * 

Trusts, 1 suppose, have their faults, but how in thunder can 
you develop the resources of a country without a trust? People 
squat in a new country full of iron, copper, coal and lead. They 
live off game, coon skins are the legal tender, there are no roads. 
everything costs live prices, and everybody growls about his 
poverty. Then some visionary crank seeks out a half dozen more 
as visionary as himself: they build a railroad, work the mineral 
deposits, lower the price of everything but 'coon skins, give peo- 
ple work- — and get rich and achieve the reputation <>( rascals. 
Weigh the good done by the Southern Pacific against its bad. 
Offset Rockefeller^ faults with the work he gives people, the low 
price of oil, etc. Men don't work for nothing. Certainly we 
must not judge a corporation by its motives, hut by the results 
accruing from those motives. To expect men to hear the cross 
of putting a project afoot to drop it as soon as the profits appear 
is manifestly absurd, manifestly human nature. No man starts 
business to benefit the public: improvement and enterprise are 

bor E selfishness. If there were more selfishness there would 

he less need for unselfishness. 

* * * 

There is a class of people in this country wdio are always ready 
mi boycott. They seem to have patented the right to ruin any 

man's business, lint when the I totted retaliates, the howl of 

"un-American" is raised. As to being •'un-American," it is 
un-American not to liit hack, hut consistently American to stand 
anything. 1 have often been amused to hear some animal re- 
cently escaped from his European masters declare "dees dam 
country is wus dan Russia.' 1 We have been exhibiting our eoun- 
trj as an asylum for the oppressed of all nations. Better call it 
"oppressed by the refuse of all nations." These people come 
'in m search of "liberty," and in a lew months want to (ami 
do), dominate the Liberty givers. Yorke, for instance, why is 
he here? liberty? Anybody coercing him? His filthy attaci on 
Mr. Phelan was applauded to the echo by the very men whose 
choice of Sehmitz, ttuef and their supervisors are now adver- 
tising. 1 am opposed to centralization, but if I am to choose 
between investing this riff-raff with power and the American 
Government with it, I shall not hesitate in mv choice. 

« * • 

Some philologist says the newspapers are the corrupters of 
our language: and they are. English is the greatest of modern 
languages and gets the least care. Every Frenchman takes a 
pride in French, and any solecism, even in a public journal, is 
nailed by acclamation. We hear educated Americans say:: "I 
had rather go,'' "Our mutual benefit," "I should have liked to 

h'li-r gone" "I very much appreciate/' "I anticipate a u I 

time." "It is me'" "I laid awake all night," etc. One method 
of getting the proper word in a sentence is by cutting out all 
qualifiers. "1 had rather go" sounds well until you exclude 
"rather." which leaves "I had go." "Anticipate." "mutual" and 
"appreciate" are pet abominations. They are dragged in to usurp 



"expect," "common" and "weigh justly." "Our mutual benefit'' 
means our "reciprocal benefit," which is nonsense. "Anticipate" 
means to prevent by going before. I "anticipated" my dismissal 
by resigning. "Mutual" means reciprocity. Our friendship is 
"mutual," our friend "common." Even Maeaulay uses "avoca- 
tion" for "vocation." 

* * * 

A week or so spent among the summer resorts of the State 
makes one wonder how so many people from San Francisco can 
be scattered among them without having a marked effect upon 
the aspect of the city's streets. San Francisco's thoroughfares 
seem to have the usual quota of people passing up and down 
them, yet the country is fairly swarming with city folk, camp- 
ing out or living at the various resorts. The variety that Cali- 
fornia offers in the way of scenery and climate gives no one a 
chance to complain of individual taste not being satisfied. Sea- 
shore, mountains and valleys offer everything that can be de- 
sired, and at prices that range from a dollar a day up to the 
schedule maintained by the best hotels of San Francisco. Every 
purse can be suited — and for those that have little purse to speak 
of. there is camping, which, after all, is the healthiest and most 
agreeable method of spending a few weeks in the country. Tents 
line all the streams at this time of the year, and in front of 
them children roll in the dirt, besmeared, begrimed and happy, 
laying up a stock of vitality to last them until next vacation 
time. 

The gipsying instinct is strong in the human race. Women 
do not have to learn how to cook over a camp fire. Men drop 
naturally into the habit of wearing their most dilapidated cloth- 
ing and of lying flat on their backs under the trees, too lazy, al- 
most, to smoke. And children enter so enthusiastically into tfi3 
out-door life that one is forced to believe that savagery is the 
natural, state of man, and our civilization but a thin veneer. 
And a good thing it is, too. The annual season in the wilds 
keeps us from over-civilization and deterioration. 

* * * 

Still another organization has been formed of women who will 
not wear bird feathers because, as they state in their proclama- 
tion, they "do not believe in slaying any living creature." Act- 
ing on this principle, these good ladies, to I" consistent, should 
not eat flesh or fish, for that involves killing living creatures; 
should not step on a spider or slaughter a mosquito, flea or other 
parasite: should not attempt to cleans.' their sinks and sewers, or 
take medicine to cure disease, for those things involve the whole- 
sale murder of myriads of microbes. These fads are entertain- 
ing, no doubt, and usually harmless, hut pursued to their logical 

conclusions, they are absurd. 

# # * 

"If we can beat our own people, we can heat anybody else," was 
the apt remark of Lieutenant Frederic X. Freeman. I". S. X., the 
other day when he handed his crew of the torpedo-boat destroyer 
Preble the trophy won by them for having beaten the whole navy 
in marksmanship Eor vessels of the destroyer class. This was the 
second time that Lieutenant Freeman's vessel has won this cham- 
pionship, the destroyer Perry, which he commanded before going 
to the Preble, having been the champion year before last. 



HANDKER- 
CHIEFS 

Men's fine French 
sheer linen handker- 
chiefs--* cru back- 
ground with borders 
and figures in helio, 
tan, blue and green. 



Bullock & Jones 

Company 

Van Ness at Rddy 



July 27, 1907 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



39 



Already Market street is regaining its prestige. Business is 
beginning to drift back to the old stands. It is now a little over 
a year since the fire when merchants rushed to Fillmore street 
to take "ill liir year leases. At the time I gave San Francisco 
live years to rehabilitate herself, i have seen nothing to change 
my belief. Every trouble we were destined to have came at once. 
Now the reaction has set in. Eastern capital is pouring in. the 
hanks are loosening up. our city is going to lie beautified. We 
have advertised our cussedness; the future will advertise our 
virtues. Money is a timid thing, and is very suspicious of all 
invitations. Finance is a wary wench, and must be well chap- 
eroned. After this strike collapses, business will improve with 
a rush. Merchants and investors, confident in the certainty of 
no more unionism, are going to "turn themselves loose." There 
will be no spasmodic revival. Everybody agrees on that. As 
to these ridiculously high wages continuing, do you know that 
thousands of union men have been working all the time for non- 
union wages? 

The majority seem to receive the statement of an unwelcome 
fact as a statement of the informer's sentiments. The news- 
giver may nol be in accord with his news; the physician with 
the disease be discovers in bis patient. Some time ago I was 
said to lack patriotism because 1 claimed that more respectable 
people kepi away from the polls than formerly. Rut "'tis true, 
and pity 'tis, 'tis true." Why is ibis? Simply because the 
American franchise is so comprehensive that many can't com- 
prehend it. Did you ever stand at a voting booth and study 
the nature and intelligence of the foreign animals that cast 
ballots? Think of lassooing a cohort of ourang-outangs in an 
African jungle for use at the American polls? Would that 
be more "'American" than the horde of creatures vomited upon 
our shores from Europe's o'er-eloyed stomach.? As an American, 
I declare that there is more vulgarity in our politics than in the 
politics of any other nation. If Russia has patrician tyranny, 
we have beastly license. 

* * * 

Hid you ever stop to think where all tlie money spent, here 
comes from? San Francisco people never hoard at the expense 
of luxuries. Think of mechanics kiting about in automobiles at 
five dollars an hour. But they do. We pay bigger wages, spend 
more money, support more hotels anil restaurants than any other 
city of our size mi earth. A dollar finds less rest here than else- 
where. Ihir shop girls dress with mure taste llian main Eastern 
rich women. Why is all this? Our ideal is healthful happiness 
and beauty. Like the Greeks of obi. we know we are living in 
a favored country, compared to which the "id Eden was — by 
the wav. have any of you folks ever been in Missouri? The blend- 
ing of all these races has produced a type of ""man never 
equaled in any unmixed race. The phvsique and complexion of 
the Anglo-Saxon, the eye of iho Dalian, the vivacity of the 
French, It ever concentration encouraged matrimony and 
variety condoned bigamy, they do in San Francisco. Our only 
monotony is municipal corruption. 

* * * 

All the wise sayings from Plato i" Poor Richard have not 

prevented one foolish action. Spain i- paralyzed by proverbs. 

Too much theory is conducive to drj rot. Theorj is i 
Bpeciousness, and "in- -. likely to be a 

misfit. Napoleon said thai Waterloo was the most perfectly 

planned of am "f bis battles. But whal mind can build a theory 

to tit all ill i future practice? Pacts .ire stubborn things. 

and each fad may produce tin' most unthought of ramifications. 
We prophesy a man's actions because we have studied him. But 
a stomach-ache, a tii of absent-mindedness, even a mosquito 
bii.', may vary the current of bis actions. Bui we know that 

■ wo made four for all past eternity, and will for all eter- 
nn\ lo come. "You reap as you sow." nol always. In 

theory, like literature, is "a cane, not a crutch." "We 
cannot enjoy the Sowers of the spring of life with the fruits of 
its autumn; the pleasures of 

ble error.'' If you can't digest these chunks of wisdom, 
borrow Mr. Sehmitz's powers of intellectual assimilation and 
Father Yorkc's theory eon ' 

* * » 

Examiner has a new victim. Respectability never fails to 
hat journalistic bull. Mr. Taylor is over- 
whelmed in the inevitable mud bath. This unhappy city- has 
suffered untold horrors; natural, artificial, moral and p 



Pears' 

"A shining coun- 
tenance" is pro- 
duced by ordinary 
soaps. 

The use of Pears' 
reflects beauty and 
refinement. Pears' 
leaves the skin soft, 
white and natural. 

Matchless for the complexion. 



The decent people are trying their best lo regulate mailers and 
restore the city's reputation. Any one unacquainted with the 
Examiner would marvel at this mud eruption. The Examiner 
went into labor a lew years ago, and was delivered of as filthy 
a brood as ever disgraced even our town. But, like a woman 
who has lost her shame, it persists in advertising its loss. What 
does the Examiner want? Not needs, but wants'' We have 
tested "rule by the people" to its legitimate conclusion. There 
is not one decency unviolated. Bribery, thievery, unblushing 
effrontery, from convicted "ibeials who should be on the chain 

gang, have advert ised our disgrace. 

• » * 

Man's moal marked peculiarity is his blindness lo bis own 

peculiarities. I kn<>w a man whose moral worth is most pro- 
nounced. Hut he has "ne fault, and one thai wars effectually 
with ill" nerves, Here is a sample: "You know Jones?" "No!" 
"No!" "No?" "Why, of course you kno« Jones; be married 
mi" of ibe Smiths." "I don'l know the Smiths!" "Dont know 
the Siniiiis: j Why, "Id Tom Smith married a Thompson! 
Thompson!! Bj this time I surrender and declare a 
with the win'' i of Thompsons; driven into perjury in pur- 
suit of peace. I have learned t" agree with my adversary while 
I am in the wav with him. I lie ten times a day about the 
: "Fine day." "Very tin.." B says: "Wlretched 
day!" "Perfectly devilish." (' says: "I/x>ks like ram." "Yes, 
sorry 1 didn't bring my umbrella." I nsed t" be truthful and 

some individuality, but individuality must be puri 
and preserved with conflict. I g worth having 

something. S See will realizi nything we want 

But as we gron older, we drift with the tide. Independence 

- opposing conservatism and conservatism never forgives 

lion. 

* * * 

Hunters propose I" t.<t the law that ma], 
with hounds a misdemeanor. I horn- they will lose. Tin- killing 
of harmless wild animals is not the most ennobling occupat 
rid at ::- best: but the "basing "I" them with d 
and should not be sanctioned. 
ing to give the deer, a chance for D is lif". and to employ h 
:- a woodsman against the anin 

"ing continue, or soon we will 
method — employing b drive the game in ft 

so-called hunters, who merely stand in one spot and sU - 

and bird- I gnus 

to them. The poacher is many di _ 
type. 



Pain. 



-"Murine Eye 1 . a Family Fa 

Makes W< .. 3 msr. An I 



- 



30 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 27, 1907. 






We numerous small lakes and 


The 


streams adjacent make this resort 


Tallac, 


headquarters for rod fisherman. 


Lake 


San Franciscans are especially 


invited to write for terms for their 


Tahoe, 


families. 


Cal. 


cTW. LAWRENCE CB> CO. 




Tallac. 



Gilroy 

Hot 

Springs 



Monte 
Rio 



Agua 

Galiente 

Springs 



Open the year round. The springs that HOLD 
THE RECORD for business during 1906. The 
Reasons: Wonderful curative properties of the 
waters; superb service; exce.tent table; easy of 
access. Every modern improvement has been 
added to this already famous resort. The wat- 
ers contain sulphur, alum, iron, soda, magnesia, 
iodine and traces of arsenic, and are very effi- 
cacious in cases of rheumatism, neuralgia, 
rheumatic gout, kidney and liver diseases, lead 
and mercurial poisoning and all bladder and 
urinary complaints. 

Hunting and trout fishing; amusements of all 
kinds. Our table is our advertisement. Rates 
$12 to $17.60 a week. Baths free. Trains leave 
Third and Townsend streets at 8:30 a. m. Direct 
stage connections for the springs. Send for 
booklet. Address W. J. McDONALD, Proprie- 
tor. 



Hotel 

Bon 

Air 


Newly renovated and now under first-class 
management. Hot and cold water in every room. 
Delightfully located in heart of Ross Valley. 
Take Sausalito Ferry to Escalle. Only 45 min- 
utes from San Francisco. Ideal home for busi- 
ness men and families. Open the year round. 
Terms reasonable. For further particulars ad- 
dress STRASSBURGER & PARKER, Postofflce, 
Larkspur, Cal. 



THE SWITZERLAND OF CALIFORNIA. 
Most delightfully situated on banks of Russian 
Kiver. Rates $2 per day, $12 per week For fur- 
ther particulars, address C. F. CARR, Monte 
Rio, Sonoma County, California. 



The 


FOR AN OUTING ON RUSSIAN RIVER. 


$10 per week and up. Everything good. 


Palms 


Tents if desired. H. B. CROCKER, Healds- 


burg, California. 



THE nearest Hot Sulphur Springs to San 
Francisco. Largest mineral water swimming 
tank In the State. No staging. 4 trains dally. 
For information, address THEO. RICHARDS, 
Agua Caliente, Sonoma County, Cal. 



SANTA CRUZ 

The Atlantic City of the Pacific 

World's most beautiful playground 

Never a Dull Moment 

Summer Season opens May 1st 



Grand Opening of New Casino and Bathing 
Pavilion announced later 



Hot 
Springs 



Witter 

Medical 

Springs 



[he 

Geysers 
Hot 
Springs 



Skaggs 

Hot 

Springs 



Tassajara 

Hot 

Springs 



New Ownership and Management. Grandest 
and most accessible of all resorts. Only seven 
miles of beautiful staging. Waters awarded 
first prize at St. Louis Exposition. 

Natural hoi soda, sulphur, plungeand tub baths. 104 to 1 16 de 
grees, (or rheumatism, malaria and all stomach troubles. Iron and 
a rsenic waters; altitude 1400 feet. Swimming tank, hunting, fine 
fishing, bowling, tennis, croquet, dancing; gas. Expert masseurse 
Round trip, $6. Rates, $10.50 to $16, baths included. Table 
unexcelled. 

Information at any S. P. office or H. H. Mc 
GOWAN, Proprietor and Manager, Paraiso 
Spiings, Monterey county, Cal. 



Witter, the most famous medical springs in 
the West. In the heart of the mountains, 
commanding a magnificent view of Clear Lake 
The automobile headquarters of Lake County. 
You can play tennis, ride, bowl, fish and bathe 
in the lakes or climb mountains. In Witter 
Springs you will find a first class place at a 
reasonable rate. 

Write (or information to ALBERT J. ARROLL. Manager, 
at the Springs, or to the General Offices of Witter Springs Co., 647 
Van Ness Ave., San Francisco. 



America's greatest health and pleasure resort. 
Positive cure for rhumatism, stomach trouble. 
Natural mineral steam and hot mineral plunge 
baths. Tepid swimming lake. Good fishing and 
hunting. Climate unsurpassed. Our table 
speaks for itself. All kinds of outdoor amuse- 
ments; dancing every evening. Livery and 
dairy connected with hotel. Rates, $10 to $14 
per week. Electric lights, telephone and post- 
office In hotel. Round trip tickets via North- 
western Pacific R. R. For further particulars, 
address R. H. CURRY, Proprietor, The Geysers, 
Sonoma County, Cal. 



SONOMA COUNTY. Only 4 1-2 hours from 
San Francisco and but 9 miles staging. Stages 
meet both morning and evening tralnB to and 
from San Francisco at Geyserville. Round-trip 
only $5.10. Terms, $2 a day or $12 a week. 
Reference: Any guest of the past 12 years. In- 
formation at Peck-Judah Bureau, 789 Market 
street, Bryan's Bureau, 1732 Fillmore St., or of 
J. F. Mulgrew, Skaggs, Cal. 



Monterey County. Best health and pleasure re- 
sort in California. Eighteen hot mineral springs, 
hot sulphur plunges; wonderful vapor baths; 
trout fishing; $12 to $14. Stage leaves Salinas 
Monday, Wednesday and Friday mornings. Peck 
Information Bureau, 789 Market street, San 
Francisco, or C. W. QUILTY, Tassajara Hot 
Springs, Monterey County. 



.Ii i.y 27, 1907. 



AXD CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



31 







LAKE MUK13J&L 
UNDER THE NEW MANAGEMENT 

of 

MARINER 8 CRAIG 

Write and secure rates for a long stay at [the Springs. 
A new garage for the accommodation of Automobile 
tourists. Rates SI 2.00 to 1 16.00 per week. 



The New Hotel 

Vendome 

San Jose 

Thoroughly rebuil I and 
red] miihed Unexcel- 
led cuirne, Every 
modern convenience, 
charmingly located in 
beautiful park, swim- 
mina pools, bowling 
alleys, tennis courts, 
also sample rooms for 
commercial men down 
(own. A delightful place to spend the summer. Rates reasonable. 

Address: HOTEL VENDOME COMPANY 




WHEN IN LOS ANGELES STOP AT THE 



Hotel Westminster 



European Plan ft 1.00 per day and up. 
With bath SI. 50 and up. 

Moderate Priced Cafe; Unexcelled Guisina; Centrally 
Located; 100 Rooms with Bath 

Fourth and Main Streets, Los Angeles, California 

F. O. JOHNSON. Proprietor 



Glenbrook 

LAKE COUNTY, CAL. 



In the heart of the forest. Good hunting and fishing. Pleasant 
drives and walks. Amusements of all kinds. Excellent table. 
Rates $10 to $14 per week. For further particulars apply to 
cTHRS. S. TREADWAY, Glenbrook P. O., Lake Co., Cal. 



Blue Lakes 



Send for pamphlets. $10 to $12 
per week. O. WEISMAN, Mid- 
lake, Lake County", Cal. 



The Original 
White Sulphur Springs 



Until New Hotel Buildings are 
erected guests can be accommodat- 
ed at private table, home plan, for 
limited number. Communicate 
with MR. and MRS. JOHN SAN- 
FORD, St. Helena, Napa Co., Cal. 



Vichy Springs, 
Mendocino 
Go,, Cal. 



Celebrated for Beauty Bath. Pronounced by 
experts a natural skin beautifler. Write for 
booklet. J. A. REDEMEYER, Prop. 



Soda 

Bay 

Springs 

Lake Co., Cal. 



Situated on the picturesque shore of Clear 
Lake. Finest of boating, bathing, hunting and 
fishing; unsurpassed accommodations; new 
launch, accommodating 40 people, built ex- 
pressly for the use of guests and excursions. 
Terms, ?2 per day, $12 per week; special rates 
to families. Take Tiburon Ferry, 7:40 a. m., 
thence by rail to Pieta, then stage or automo- 
bile direct to springs. Rpund trip, good for 
six months. $9. Further Information, address 
Peck-Judah Bureau, 7S9 Market street. Bryan's 
Bureau. 1732 Fillmore street. Managers, and 
J. McBrlde and Agnes Bell .Rhoads, Soda Bay 
Springs, Lake County, Cal., via Kelseyvllle 
Postofflce. 



Howard 
Springs 

Lake Co., Cal. 



Cures all cases of kidney and liver trouble. 
The friend of the rheumatic and gout patient; 
42 mineral springs. Hot sulphur and Iron 
plunge baths. Magnesia tub baths. References 
— Any guest for the last twenty years. Rates, 
$12 to $16 per week. Fare from San Francisco, 
$9 round trip. Leave San Francisco 7.30 a. m.. 
via S. P., or 8 a. m. via Cal. and Northwestern 
R. R. Send for catalogue, or address J. W. 
LAYMANCE, Owner and Manager, Howard 
Springs, Lake County, Cal. 



There's Only One Del Monte 

Golf, Sea-Bathing, Motoring. Parlor Car from San Francisco 
twice daily. Special week end rates. Free Art exhibition and 
sales gallery of California painters. Week end golf tournament 
during the summer. 

Inquire Peck-Judah Co., 789 Market St. Information Bureau 
Southern Pacific, Flood Building or Del Monte, California ,H. R. 
Warner .Manager. 



Ranchella 



An ideal home in the Santa Cruz Mountains 
surrounded by beautiful grounds, five miles 
from Santa Cruz, in the Redwood belt. Beau- 
tiful drives, good trout fishing. Telephone, 
gas. $10. Address MRS. E. H. BUNTING, 
R. F. D. 87, Santa Cruz, Cal 



STOP at Lhe 




"KEY ROUTE 


INN" 


22nd Street, and Broadway, Oak] 


and 


CONVENIENT TO SAN FRANCISCO 


BY FREQUENT TRAINS 


FROM 


THE HOTEL ARCADE 




M. S. Mull 




Manager 



35! 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 27, 1907. 



.1 NEW PUBLICATION. 

The News Letter is in receipt of a publication entitled "The 
Pacific Telephone Magazine." It is attractive, and is published 
monthly for distribution among its employees by the Pacific, 
Telephone and Telegraph Company. The frontispiece this month 
is a fine reproduction of a photographic likeness of Mr. Henry 
T. Scott, the President of the company. The editorial helm of 
the publication is in the hands of Mr. Willis Brindley, the Pub- 
licity Agent. One item has struck the fancy of the News Letter 
statistician, and with the desire of giving a wide circulation to 
knowledge that will give the outsider a wider view of industrial 
conditions in San Francisco, file article is given publication in 
these columns: 

"Less than li Eteen months have elapsed since the San Francisco 
Exchange of the Pacific States Telephone and Telegraph Com- 
pany, the largest and best equipped exchange in its system, was 
almost completely destroyed by (ire. Before the smoke had 
cleared, plans for rebuilding had been outlined, and the neces- 
sary material was ordered. On June 1, 1906, six weeks after the 
disaster, there were 4,953 telephones in use. Before the lire, the 
number had been 52,000. On June 1, 1907, San Francisco ex- 
change had 29,938 stations. There has been a most gratifying 
increase in the past year in the number of stations and in the 
amount of loll business throughout the Bell Coast territory, and 
prospects are bright for even greater prosperity in the next 
twelve months. On June 1. 1906, the total number of Bel] sub- 
scribers' stations in the territory now occupied by The Pacific 
Telephone and Telegraph Company was 204,537. On dune f, 
1907, the number had increased to 21 I. |of . a gain of :i I per cent. 
This is a greater per cent than would have appeared if the San 
Francisco disaster had not lessened the total for June 1. 1906, 
hut. even considering this, the increase in number of stations 
is remarkable. The toll business was '.'l per rent greater Eor 
May. 1907, than for May. 190fi." 



DEARTH OF OFFICERS IX THE ARMY. 

No less an authority than Major-General .1. Franklin Bell, 
chief of staff of the United States army, states that there is a 
great dearth of officers, many of whom have been detached from 
their regiments to various departments of Governmental service. 
The regiments are only partially supplied with officers, and the 
whole army, as a result, is ill-prepared for active operations in 
the field. Before the Hispano-American war. the army was 
scattered about at various posts in the United States, and did not 
need a large number of officers, so that it was possible to detach 
officers without causing serious inconvenience. Since the war, 
most of the army lias been stationed in the Orient, and the 
regiments there ought to he provided with a full complement 
of officers. Inasmuch as the United States depends entirely 
upon enlisted soldiers wdio join the colors in time of war from 
patriotic motives, there ought to he a sufficiently large number 
of regular officers to take command of tin' volunteers. The 
National Guards of the various States have some knowledge 
of tactics, but possess little or none of the technical training of 
regular army officers. 



FLATTER)- A XI> DECEIT. 

To bamboozle a man, find out bis weak point and play that 
point for all it is worth. Flattery may be deceit, but if is par- 
donable deceit. Why say something to worry when von can say 
something to please, spencer says: "We arc at the mercy of 
our associated idea-." and we arc. It may he my duty to impart 
bad news. Bui the recipient associates me with bad news. Asso- 
ciation is everything. For this reason, a man is a fool if he 
says aught to arouse disagreeable associations. Candor may he 
carried too far. Never miss the chance to say something pleas- 
ant. You can lie agreeable withoui being fulsome. It is not 
flattery so much Unit wins as it is the way the flattery is given. 
The way lo flatter a man is to find out what he thinks he is, and 
tell him hi' is it. The most approved method of making a woman 
comfortable is to find out what some other woman thinks she is 
ami tell the first woman she isn't it. "Women are tolerant only 
of handsome men and homely women." 



LUNCH AND DINNER 
at the Little Palace Hotel, at Post and Leavenworth, are meals 
that are worth while. All the care of a splendid chef, and the 
service of the old house, combined with an exquisite menu. 



Fairmont Hotel 

SAN FRANCISCO 
The Most Superbly Situated Hotel in the World 

EUROPEAN PLAN 

All rooms out«side; every room with a bath 
Rates $2.50 and upward. Special terms 
to permanent, guests. Management! of 

The PALACE HOTEL COMPANY 



(t 



*\ 



Hotel St. Francis 





Grill Room 


The 


Best Service 


The 


Best Meals 



SAN FRANCISCO 

Take Your Friends There 
For Luncheon 




J 



New 
Poodle 

Dog 

Restaurant 
and 

T| 1 N. W. Corner 

Poll 8 Post Sts. 

San Francisco 



Phone 

Frankli 



2960 



THE FAIRLAWN 



Phone Merrill 38 

Fruitvale Avenue and Bellevue Street, Fruitvale. California 

Just Completed. P. H. fie M. L. ZAPPETTINI. Proprietors. Everything fint claa.. 



Summer 
Trips 


Before making your choice of a place to 
spend your vacation, get a copy of our 
"SUMMER TRIPS OUTINGS FOR 1907," 
free at our INFORMATION BUREAU. 
THE PECK-JUDAH CO., 789 Market St. 
Sent by Mail for 4c Postage. 



Write 
W. H. Miller, 

Uliiah, Gal. 



for livery accommodations, Lake and Mendo- 
cino Co., stage for Blue Lakes, Laurel 
Dell, Saratoga Springs, Witter Springs, Up- 
per Lake, Baker Springs, Potter Valley, 
John Day's, Lierly's, Vichy" Springs. 



"BREVITY IS THE SOUL OF WIT." 
GOOD WIFE! YOU NEED 

SAPOLIO 




g £(j3 7R^B90l!8 eQ 




TKR 



Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast. 




VOL. LXXIV 



San Francisco, Cal., August 3, 1907 



No. 5 



The SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER Is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor, Fred- 
erick Marriott, at 905 Lincoln avenue, Alameda, California, and at 773 
Market street, San Francisco, Cal. Telephone — Alameda. 1131. San 
Francisco — Temporary 351)4. 

Entered as second-class matter, May 12, 1906, at the PostofRce at Ala- 
meda. California, under the act of Congress of March 3, 1879. 

New York office — (where information may be obtained regarding sub- 
scriptions and advertising) — 206 Broadway, C. C. Murphy, representative. 
London Office— 30 Cornhill, E. C, England. George Street & Co. 

All social items, announcements, mining, commercial and financial 
news notes, advertisements or other matter intended for publication, 
in the current number of the NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA AD- 
VERTISER, should be sent to the Alameda office not later than Thurs- 
day morning. 



Tt has already been made very clear to Langdon that he 

cannot run Mayor Taylor. 

The theft of Korea is complete, and the goods are under 

lock and key, and Japan has the key. 

The trouble with Korea was that she had too many 

Schmitzes and Ruefs and Supervisors. 

"Water spout in North Carolina," says the headlines. Did 

you not mean wind-storm in Lincoln, Neb.? 

No, that was not the ship Columbia that is mentioned in 

the Song, '•Columbia, the Gem of the Ocean." 

How very little is heard of Selunitx anil Thief these days, 

and how very true it is thai ever) dog has his day. 

It is not the fault of the auto if some new beginners 

spend more of their lime under than in the machine. 

'Forty font snakes in Nebraska and forty pound water- 
melons in Texas! Where are the temperance i rusadi re? 

— ■ — The Amalgamated Order of Ananiases are on a fishing 
vacation. They will return with a basket full pretty soon. 

— ■ — They have "fake beer" in prohihilion Pasadena — and also 
the real article for the knowing. See where the joke mines in? 

(irafter CoiTev says his "conscience is clear." Wonder 

what the size of the hold-up would have to be to stir the mud ? 

The fields of criminal litigation are keeping lav 

busy gathering golden sheaves, and "the people pay the fre 

The Hague Congress has come to the conclusion that 

peace has aboul as many terrors as war, and a loi n 
tainties. 

The Czar has rendu I letter way to rid his empire 

of anarchists is to exterminate them. He is working on the job 
right now. 

■ British Columbia, Australia and South Africa arc taking 

measures to keep oul the Japanese. So have we, but they come 

jusl the same. 

Will some friend of the man Cornelius whisper in his ear 

thai the Carmen's strike is ovi Hi - aol seem to 

heard the new - ' 

What 1 1 .n.\ rails lVlmas and what Delmas calls lb u . 

is no longer a matter of public interest. You can't fool all the 
people all the i 

The Russians have a aded that they would rather 

ilution than a parliament. Opportunities to rob and 
kill would lie better. 

The price ^< battleships is now quoted 

110,000,000. without a guarantee that the best will last ten min- 
utes when in trouble. 
This is the difference: When an American goes to Paris 

'l a day for the use of an automobile, and when 
itry he takes a trollej 
le. 



They say Mayor Taylor puts the muses aside and talks 

in eold prose when he feels that cuss-words trimmings are 
needed. 

-San Francisco should not be discouraged. London has 



not yet recovered from the dock labor strike of nearly twenty 
years ago. 

Langdon called upon Mayor Taylor to instruct him in 

his duties. The Mayor smiled and looked toward the door. 
That was all. 

Mark Twain's dope on his visit to King Edward shows 

what a mistake Edward made wdien he invited the alleged humor- 
ist to his home. 

Schmitz says he certainly will run again. It is to be 

hoped that he will get out before he is too old and too frail to 
do a little running. 

When we get our coast defenses in shape according to the 

programme, we can maintain a continuous firing line from 
Seattle to San Diego. 

The figures are in. and they say that during the year 

closed June 30th, L,285,349 aliens came to this country to help 
us run the Government. 

'An Illinois doctor advises parents to feed their children 

Ereely on green I'm it. Is his practice falling off, or has he a 
grudge against little folk? 

Memphis is the champion. One of her grand juries has 

returned 1,524 indictments against the Standard Oil Company, 
and the jury is still in session. 

Zitumer's judgment mav be all wrong and weak, but 

there is no doubl about ids ability as well as his inclination to 
stand by his friends in any event. 
"The Hermit Kingdom" is now oul of the woods. There 

i- no doubt aboul that, and is stepping lively, too, to the tune 
of Japan's "Cut out and lei me in." 

The rouslv informs the world tint 

America i< now the second naval power. Yes. in time of 
but oi hurw ise bigger than the 

Will the time ever come when theatre-goers will go the 

way when "Uncle Tom's Cabin" is on the boards? Ye 
- what a monstrosity of a performao 

A Greek restaurant was torn into splinu mob in 

Roanoke, Ya.. the other day. but so far as heard from. Kin"; 
has asked no questions about the affair. 

The Iowa State Hoard of Education has turned down 

I pel cut of the applicants for cer 
- Viol. They'd plenty of political pull, but no education. 

"Shall woman be free?" shrieks a noted sutf ■ 

; linly, if she wants to be free. The divorce courts are widi 

she does not have to gay "yes" in the firs; instance. 

Certain lawyers in San Francisco and Be - great 

ranting business as the old-time camp meeting negro 
preacher. Wonder why they how! and fling their arms like wild 
men. 

"Man's re 

more than a heap of mangled remains." lb- thh 
_ an automobile and is reading up on th^ if acci- 

The destrnctiveness of battleship to 

Vow. if they do equally w.dl when en- 
2 iging the enemy, they will be pronounced a success in the lines 
■ ; killing. 



Otiortal 



Comment 



Rivers of Blood 
tveitmoe. 



General Bingham, of New York, 
police chief and commissioner, 
ex-army officer, makes a state- 
ment this week that is full of 
suggestion regarding one of the greatest ailments from 
which our free country is suffering, and Bingham, who is 
probably the most efficient chief of police New York has ever 

had. points out that the wave of crime that is II Ling Mew 

York and Brooklyn is something comparatively new. He 
says that this kind of crime may be cured by making the entry 
of the poorer class of foreigners of nil nationalities a difficult 
matter. He calls public attention to the fact that, except in 
a singular instance, every malefactor, who has been arrested 
for crimes committed against little girls and women is a 
foreigner ! 

All over this fair land, everywhere, we find the same thing, 
the irreconcilable agitator is the aggressive criminal. Some- 
times the trouble-breeder takes the form of a socialist labor 
chief: sometimes it is the "black hand" member, but always 
the mischief-maker, the agitator, the murderer, the anarchist, 
the following of the dynamiter and rioter, is made up of a 
majority of foreign birth. 

The excess of effrontery of this foreign scum is exemplified 
in San Francisco by the Corneliuses, the Tveitmoes ami the 
Furusetlis. To cap the climax, we have the avowed candidacy 
for Mayor of the city of Tveitmoe, the "rivers-of-blood" man. 



proven by his utterances an out-and-out anarchist. Every 
encouragement should be given him in bis ambition, and he 
should be allowed to run, for be will be so badly beaten that 
the miserable record as a vote getter made by the last socialist 
candidate for Governor will be a remarkable performance in 
comparison. The Gubernatorial candidate was a respectable 
man, who had some tittle claim, aside from his Utopian 
theories, on the public's patience, endorsement or recognition. 
He was noi a fire-brand, not a "rivers-of-blood" Tveitmoe. 



Tveitmoe is not the question; be is a gnat, and it is with 
tin' swarm of gnats, (be vermin of Europe, that we have to 
do. Tveitmoe is only a sample, the criminals so sorely puz- 
zling Bingham of New York are other samples; they are not 
all of the same brand or breed, but they are all equally ver- 
min compared to whom the law-abiding, industrious Japan- 
ese ami Chinaman is a mosi desirable citizen. 

Steps should be taken to enact ami then rigidly enforce 
a -trict law against the admittance of nil aliens, except the 

most desirable of the industrial class. This country wants no 
more "poor white trash" of the rivers-of-blood, black-hand, 
outraging of women ami children varieties, ami Bingham is 
right. Tbe foreigner mu.-i be kepi out unless be is of decent 
character, industrious and law-abiding, ami European Gov- 
ernments should !»' notified thai they cannot dump their 
jail refuse upon these shores. 



The outcome of the Glass trial 
The Trial of has given almost universal satis- 

Louis Glass. faction. Louis Glass is not a free 

man, but it has been demon- 
strated that tbe power of the "big stick" does not extend be- 
yond the jurisdiction of the District Attorney's office, and the 
boundaries of certain court rooms. Certain it is that the 
wild brandishing of tbe said stick had little or no effect on 
the jury. It is certain that the charge given by Judge Law- 
ler was followed to (be letter l>\ tbe gentlemen comprising the 

jury. The evidence before tbe court did not disclose any con- 
nection by Louis Glass with any criminal act. 

Long ago. Mr. Glass hail been absolved by the public. The 
case has been closely watched, and it developed from tbe evi- 
dence that Louis (ilass was not an officer of the corporation 
at the time tbe crime is alleged to ha\e been committed; that, 
in the ramifications of an immense business, it was possible 
for a man who had resigned his office to have no knowledge 



of the expenditure of even so large a sum of money as $50,- 
000. It is necessary, in the perfeci and smooth operation of 
the official mechanism of -o large a corporation as tbe Tele- 
phone Company, that each official be given his allotted duty. 
Assuming that the $50,000 was paid tbe Supervisors, it is 
possible that tbe knowledge of such an expenditure would be 
kept secret from as many people as possible, ami if is more 
than probable that Louis Glass knew nothing whatever' about 
it. providing even if it tool; place, when be was still the mov- 
ing spirit of tbe corporation. The verdict is a satisfactory 
one. because it demonstrates that there are courts in, San 
Francisco in which an accused man may obtain justice, but it 
is a disappointment because Louis Glass, under tbe testimonj 
offered, should have been made a Eree man. lie is not a 

criminal, ami not one jot of evidence was offered coj cting 

him with tbe crime. The evidence of itself alone cleared him 
of .ill taint of evil-doing, ami be would bave obtained tbe -me ■ 
or a better verdict without tbe help of the much-over-esti- 
mated Delmas. 



Captain John Mooney has been dis- 
DlSlUSSAL of Mooney. honorably dismissed from the Police 

Department because lie refused to 
overlook tbe transgressions of specially privileged saloon-keepers 
and brothel managers, ft was not until a few months ago that 
Mooney developed a militant antipathy In vice, but bis previous 
complacency may be attributed to orders from the upper nib'.'. 
rather than an acquiescence in the sordid condition- thai pre- 
vailed so long in bis district. The effect of Mooney's removal 
has been a revival of al! tbe different forms of viciousness known 
in a big city. In fact, it was at the instigation of flic men who 
live upon vice that bis star was taken away. Five hours before 
the Police Commissioners announced the decision, the news had 
been told and re-told. Preparations were begun early in tbe 
morning to celebrate the event, and by night-fall gambling 
houses, brothels ami questionable cafes were running open 

houses. Mayor Taylor has promised to look into these c 11- 

tions as soon as his new Board of Supervisors are seated, but the 
present Police Commission will resist any effort to oust them, 
and during the long legal fight espected, the tenderloin will not 
be molested. 

Here is an opportunity for the District Attorney and the 
Grand Jury to accomplish a really creditable thing. By Indict- 
ing the Police Commissioners for malfeasance, crime may be 
checked until Mayor Taylor has an opportunity to test his au- 



thoi-itv. The Grand Jury is familiar with the conditions, as 
both tbe old ami new tenderloins underwent an inspection a I'ev, 

weeks ago. The more staid members were horrified at the con- 
ditions. Among them wis the venerable Jeremiah Deasy, who 
had ii. \. i before wandered so far from bis own fireside. Wlbile 

in o r the cafes, a roguish, short-skirted patron, mistaking the 

purpose of tbe jurors' visit, coquettishly plucked at Deasy's 
gray beard. Deasy. who is a pillar of tbe church, resented the 

indignity, and calling bis colleagues al I him, demanded that 

they leave before be was subjected to another insult. 

With this incident fresh in his mind, Deasy for one will lie in 
favor of curtailing tbe privileges granted by the police to the un- 
fortunates of tbe under-world. District Attorney Langdon has 
also, ot times, posed as a crusader in the fight against vice. With 
tbe Grand Jury at his back, be should be able to put up a light 
thai will .ii least force Ibis element to keep under cover, and 

in one district. As conditions exist to-day. the most populou 
residence section of tbe city is honeycombed by vice. 



As was to be expected, labor leaders are kicking bei lUSi 

Mayor Taylor did not appoint any of them to the Board of 
Supervisors. The facts are. lie did appeal to them to mime one 
or two of their fellows to represent labor unionism on tlie board, 

but they refused. They preferred to remain oulside. SO the) 
could make mischief. That's tbe kind of citizens they arc. 



August 3, 1907. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



Warning in 'J 



I'ii.- News Letter has sounded a note 
of wai ning before about the import- 
am e of the conservative forces in 
this citj getting together and giving their united support to 
be eai ■ enc\ and good government al the next elecl ion. 

of the Labor Unions in refusing to take any pari 
in the present city Government should arouse public sentiment 
to the danger which confronts this city. It is clear that the only 
motive for their refusal is their desire to be left free to support 
a labor union ticket of their own this fall. Can it be necessary 
to point out to the people of San Francisco what the election of 
such a ticket would mean? is there a business man in the com- 
munity thai lines not know that if it be telegraphed to the cotin- 
try the day alter next election in this municipality that it lias 

again I n handed over to the McCarthys, Corneliuses and 

Caseys that every channel by which the money to re-build flows 
into the city will at once be closed? Has not every resident of 
the town had an occular demonstration what the continuation 
of the present boodling, labor union regime means in the fact 
that, with the conviction of Schmitz, things at once began to re- 
vive, and with the appointment of Taylor they have almost be- 
gun to boom? The personality of the two men has in no wise 
produced these results. It is the causes they represent. One the 
side of disgrace, dishonesty and irresponsible unionism, the 
other, good government, honesty and conservativeness ? That 
lesson should not be lost on the voters of San Francisco, who 
have homes and interests here. If the present regime continues 
after the nest election, then work will stop, business will be 
depressed, labor idle and the city retarded enormously in its 
growth. Every thoughtful man, be he laborer, mechanic, mer- 
chant or professional, in the community, knows that we but fore- 
tell a certainty if another union labor ticket is elected. 



I. Main's ],'i PI SAL. 



Honey's life in Arizona is a new 

The Muck-raker \ni> field uj which the magazine writ- 

thb Muck. ers have seized for sensational pen- 

pictures. Lincoln Stell'ens devotes 
man)- pages of an Eastern periodica] in telling bow the chief 
prosecutor roped cattle, drank whisky, played politics and finally 
killed a man. The story has all the thrills of a dime novel with 
a moral about as deeply hidden. Steffens, by the way, has be- 
come one of the prosecution clique. Upon bis arrival here three 
months ago, he attached himself to Sprei kels 1 staff and has since 
enjoyed the free. Ion of the "red house." where the plans for 
prosecution and persecution arc outlined. Without any foun- 
dation, the rumor has been persistently circulated that Steffens 
is the accredited representative of President Roosevelt, who. the 
prosecution wauls the public to believe, is taking a personal in- 
terest in the outcome of the movement. Why the President 
should have a representative here is noi explained. It is ob- 
- ru however, thai some one connected with the prosecution is 
ii ing bis name as a support for the tottering foundation upon 
» 1 1 oh i he work of \l r. Spreckels qovi resl -. 



I.ipan !i.i - u an order to a Hungarian dealer for 10.- 

000 cavalrj horses. To pack naval supplies to her fleet? The 

Japanese cavalrj i- almost as much Of a joke as the Swiss navy. 



To assist him in the of the 

Ruffled his Composure, telephone officials, Lavi 

brought with him. from New 
William I >.i\ !e\ . a pi ifessiona ' ster and u >r, who 

has a reputation for cleverness in Ba • quite the equal 

as that of the much advertised Detective Burns. Dayley quickly 

red the situation, and has caused the prosecution both 
use. Heney, who resents tb censor- 

ship put upon his high-handed methods, kept Dayley under 
nap throughout trial. At the last moment he 

was called to the witness -land to use Heney an opportUD 

mi him. Pavlov wenl through the disagree 
with o, ire and dignity, but. being unused to the 

ethics, h ; ion leap 

barriers was on the sidewalk. As he 1' 

i'l. a newsbo; thrust the Overland Monthly ini 
"Here'- shouted 

the urchin, anxious to earn fifteen cents. This was more than 
nd. He hesitated, looked at the boy, and as he 
turned on his he limed with acquired W 

"To hell with Heney." 



The action of the labor leaders in 

refusing hi lake am pan in the city 
Government shows how short- 

rj i!io\ we, and how with them the public interests and the 
public welfare is always subordinated to their own sche S of 

self-aggrandizement. It is not difficult to understand win thej 
declined. They are no busier than the rest of the community; 

in fact, mosi of them have nothing to do but to draw their sal- 
aries from the dupes who contribute to their support, so the ex- 
cuse that they had not the time to give lo the duties of Super- 
visors is absurd. They did not want to go on the Taylor board 

because they feared that the administration of our present Mayor 
will be a success, and that in that ease the public will want to 
continue a good thing instead of once more handing over the 
city to the tender mercies of Cornelius, McCarthy and the resl 
of the "gang." Labor wants to re-elect either Schmitz or some 
one that will be no better, and very likely worse, and they did 
not want to identify themselves am! the labor cause with any 
successful administration in the meantime. They have drawn 
the class line. Nothing that labor has ever done during its 
saturnalia for the past six years shows more clearly the utter 
lack of patriotism, principle and honor which actuates the men 
now at the head of the labor movement in this metropolis. It 
shows that they are simply out for everything and anything, 
even the destruction of the town, and simply to enrich their 
leaders. A word to the wise is sufficient. Every voter of San 
Francisco who hopes to see the town rebuilt and rehabilitated 
again should make a note of these facts, and act accordingly at 
the polls in November. 



MacArthur, the labor boss, says there arc 100,000 people 

in San Francisco who work. Does that figure include labor agi- 
tators, the Cornelisues, the Tveitmoes and the Furuseths who 
work their jaws and wits for a living? 



A Chance for 
California. 



The Philippines arc vising a steadily 
increasing quantity of Australian 
wine; the fresh meat supply comes 
from Australia in English refrig- 
erator vessels; the people of the islands are using more and 
more English-made clothing. France sends a steadily-increas- 
ing amount of millinery and dress goods lo Manila each year. 
The reports show that the trade wiih all foreign countries has 

increased; with the United States it has decreased. Where is the 
boasted American enterprise? The first atep to send all (bis 
purchase money to San Francisco is the establishment of abso- 
lute free trade with our dependencies. The duty on sugar, coffee 
and all other Philippine products should be revoked. Does the 
sugar trust still control the nation? Respectfully referred to 
the President of the United Sta 



In spite of it all. confidence in the present and future of 

San Francisco is as firm as the everlasting hills. Money is 
plentiful and commercial and industrial edifices of most magni- 
ficent proportions are everywhere soing up. 



Sororities and 
Fraternitii s. 



The educational convention in Los 

be other day passed some 

very positive , - opposing 

which 
the teachers Ar,-]- riously imp 

ountry. and undermining their discipline. It 
should not be difficult to destroy that evil if it is properly at- 
tacked. Objectionable societies should be suppressed, and child- 
ren and youths who do not obey such imptly 
minished. and if necessary expelled. There is decidedly too j 

ency to allow our schools to be run by the pupils and not 
tid the sooner we return to old-fashioned meth- 
ods in this in better for teachers, pupils and publi. 
i at ion. 



The clouds are rolling by, and daylight will soon bo here. 

we shall know what Spreckels and company have been after 
for the cash they put up to knock out certain public utility 

•rations. 



Jesse R. Grant, son of bis father, announces that he will 

sten to the call of any party to be its presidential candidate. 
Speak to Tom Watson about it. 



6 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 3, 1907. 



The. Filipino is developing so rap- 
Wonderful Filipino. idly, under the benign teachings of 

the American, that he has succeeded 
in drawing the attention of the English and the Dutch bureau- 
cracy toward himself. It is a matter of surprise to the Javanese 
and the Indian authorities that where they, one and all, predicted 
failure as a result of a liberal American policy, the most won- 
derful success should be attained. No other country has ever 
made the progress with its wards that has been attained by the 
Government of the United States. When Cavite fell, Admiral 
Dewey was quoted as saying that, although he did not believe 
that the Fi'ipino was ready for self-government, he was to be 
favorably considered with the Cuban. Events have proven that 
he is, as a citizen, immeasurably superior to the Cuban, and that, 
with less opportunity, he has made a much greater advance to- 
ward obtaining and holding the respect of the nations of the 
world. 

The English newspapers are republishing an item that origi- 
nally found publicity in the columns of the London Commercial 
Intelligence, and the comment in French and Dutch newspapers 
is all in favor of less repressive measures, as far as the depen- 
dencies of those countries are concerned. Germany looks upon 
our success with an evil and a jealous eye, for she has made a 
dismal failure of her attempts in West Africa. 



only their passing curiosity, and is accepted as a matter of course 
and is not* worth editorial comment. The Republican, on some 
subjects, is sane; on others it ha? mental tuberculi — otherwise 
bugs. 



A Representative 
Assembly. 



The Governments of the world have 
attempted to govern subject people 
in the most repressive manner. The 
people of the Orient have always 
been treated as spoiled and mentally undeveloped children, and 
to this day there are men, who should know better, who advocate 
the same treatment of all Asiatic people, forgetting that the 
Orient is wide awake and that it is learning very fast. The 
world powers are looking at our experiment of a representative 
assembly in the Philippines with green-eyed envy, and in some 
quarters of Europe this is pronounced in advance one of the 
great failures of American statesmanship. No greater injustice 
could be done our countrymen in the tropics, who are sacrificing 
themselves for the good of mankind, or to the administration 
at Washington, an administration that has been a signal success 
as far as is concerned its dealings with our dependencies. ]n 
the United States, an unpatriotic inhuman league of so-called 
Anti-Imperialists is busy trying to foment trouble between the 
Americans in the Philippines and the more intellectual of the 
natives. This league might be a power for good, but its leaders 
choose, through deliberate denial of evidence, that il should be a 
power for evil. 



Every action of the league tends to 
The Anti-Imperialists, draw the American and the Fili- 
pino farther apart. Luckily, this 
element is not now as vociferous in American politics as it was 
some time ago, and its chief exponents of the press, the pluto- 
cratic Evening Post of New York, and that acidulated specimen 
of New England conservatism, the Springfield Republican, have 
little or no influence in the shaping of national policies. If it 
could be shown that the Philippines might be made a prey to 
Wall street promoters, and the railroad, timber and land barons, 
then permanent annexation of the islands to the United Stales 
would be advocated by the relict of the late lamented Godkin. 
If the editorial mind that, controls the Springfield Republican 
could be operated upon and the color-line bug excised, one might 
expect an occasional editorial based upon a common-sense >. e» 
of things, when an African or an Asiatic is concerned. 



The Springfield Republican is rep- 
Coddling the Aprican. resentative of that class of Ameri- 
can who believe that the negro or 
the Chmaman or the Malay or Jap must be treated with the ut- 
most care, packed in the cotton of courtesy, as it were, and. as 
a delicate adopted or illegitimate child, who has beeii spoiled 
by indulgent foster parents or guardians, given all the rights of 
the legitimate children, and a few more, because of its acloption 
or its illegitimacy. The moment anything i s said about a crime 
committed by a negro, they are up in arms to demand a why and 
a wherefor he was hanged. A crime committed by a white man 
and followed by the swift punishment of Judge Lynch, excites 



The two methods, the liberal Ameri- 
Tiie Two Methods. can method of giving the dependent 

people the fullest possible represen- 
tation and the European method of repression and harsh treat- 
ment, is fully illustrated in the failure of Japan in Manchuria, 
in Korea and in Formosa. The most repressive methods that 
have ever been enacted to govern a dependent people have been 
in vogue in Formosa, and it is safe to say that Japan finds her- 
self face to face with as grave a problem to-day as on the first 
day she raised the banner of the rising sun over the wonderful 
island. The same methods are being put into practice in Korea. 
Manchuria is sullen and unresponsive. Germany, with the same 
methods of bayonet and no representation, is a total failure in 
West Africa. England, also, fails to grasp the fact that liberal 
policies would carry much farther with India than repressive 
ones. 



India is a volcano that bids fair to 
India in a Ferment. burst at any moment into flame. It 

is not that India would rush blindly 
to a bloody revolution, but it is the same idea that prevails 
among all intelligent Asiatics that government without repre- 
sentation is a farce. It is not that the Japanese cry of the Orient 
for the yellow race or the brown race, "Asia for the Asiatics/' 
has many adherents, but is the fact that all the Orient is pulsing 
with a new life. Ever since Dewey's first gun relieved the 
Filipinos of the yoke of Spain, this sentiment has been growing. 
Nationality means not much to the Asiatic. There is no nation- 
ality in China; there is little nationality in the Philippines, and 
in India there is no such fetish. In Japan we have a semi, 
idolatrous worship of the Emperor and a growing national feel- 
ing. In all these countries there is is a growing feeling with that 
we have endowed them. We, the white race, line taught them 
the use of their minds, and then we blindly deny them the plain 
prerogative of the result of the use thus conferred. The Asiatic, 
it will be found, has at bottom a strong leaven of common sense. 
Flag, country, nationality, all these are the synonyms of form, 
and their cry is not for these, but for the largest measure of the 
real thing. It would pay us to establish a world school to diffuse 
the knowledge that the Asiatic is needful to us ; that he does not 
live on another and strange planet, and that those races, once 
from one great central stem, are gradually coming together again 
and that the centuries to come will tell the story of the com- 
mingling of ail races, the usage of one tongue and the eventual 
brotherhood of man. As in the original, it will be the white race 
predominant, and the language of the white race will be the 
volapuk of the ultimate development. Coddling and maudlin 
sentiment, the measures of the Anti-Imperialist, repression and 
force, the measures of the elder nations, are the means that 
retard the fulfillment of fate's decrees. 




V chas.kfcilus&co U 
ft EXCLUSIVE * 

HIGH GRADE CI OTHIFRS 

No Branch Store*. No Agents. 

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are ready showing undeniable merit. 

We use everv facility attainable to sell the best men's clothes made. Here 
you find brain and quality merged. Good, tasteful dressers will appreciate 
that our exertions this season were extraordinary. Every pattern and model 
is entirely new. containing a "Goldfield of Style." obliterating freaks and 
frills of all kinds. When on the clothes question, try ours. 



KIjNG SOLOMON'S HALL, 

Fillmore Street, near Sutter, San Francisco 



August 3, 1907. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



\~i:\v £ 



je vessels are being built 
Nagasaki tor the Toyo Ki.-en 
Kaiaha Company . 'I hey an 
ships, each being 576 Eeel long, with a beam of 63 feet and a 

depth of 39 feet. The] are bo be equipped with turbine ang i, 

triple screws and will burn oil. One of them, the Tenyo Maru, 
will be launched at the end of August, and is expected to be 
ready for service next February. The other, Chiyo Maru, will 

lie launched in December, and is to go into e mission nexl 

June. Each will carry 8,000 inns of freight and have accommo- 
dations for 2o0 first-class cabin passengers. The work upon 
the two steamers began a year and a half ago. They will cost 
two and a half million dollars in gold apiece, and will be as 
handsome vessels as can be constructed. 



A good move has been made by the 
Wisdom by Hotel Men. hotel men of this city toward cor- 
recting many of the false notions 
that prevail in the East regarding San Francisco. A meeting of 
the Hotel Managers' Association was held at the Hotel Fair- 
mont, and a committee was appointed which will select delegates 
for the important work to be done. This delegation will go to 
Portland, thence to New York, and will return by way of New 
Orleans and the South. All along the road the truth will be 
spread regarding conditions here. People will be told that a 
good new city is arising on the site of the old one; that there are 
first-class hotels for the accommodation of the public; that union 
labor is being made to take its proper place, thus assuring rapid 
advancement in building. Such work cannot help having a good 
effect. 



The Union Labor Party has stepped 
McCarthy succeeds uxrsm. out of the frying pan into the fire 

by enthroning the unspeakable P. 
H. McCarthy as its leader in place of the fallen Ruef. McCar- 
thy is now the Czar, not only of the Building Trades Council, 
but of the Union Labor party as a whole, as a political machine. 
His will is law in that party. During these last days of the 
Union Labor administration, while there are yet jobs to be 
handed out. to tax-caters, it is no longer a case of "see Ruef." It 
is "see McCarthy." McCarthy holds court in one of his two or 
three offices, and there the faithful seek his indorsement; there 
he issues his tirades; there the chiefs of municipal commissions 
come meekly before him to ask his wishes regarding appoint- 
menis. Qreal as was McCarthy's power with the Building 
Trades before, ii >•• even greater n«» with the Union Labor 
party, which found itself floundering, about leaderlesa, after the 
downfall of Ruef, its former boss. McCarthy saw his chance, 
stepped to the front with alacrity and shrewdness, and the sheep 
fell in behind him. 

Ruef has I n supplanted by Boss McCarthy. Results 

will soon be coming rapidly. 



A Moat in rat 
Eastern Optic. 



I i is strange how differently we 
view our neighbors' shortcomings 
from our own. To read the Eastern 
Ts and their comments on con- 
ditions in San Francisco, one would suppose that this was the 
firsl time thai there had been any boodling in municipal poli- 
fcics, and that bribery of public officials had been discovered by 
Ruef. Certain,. i Franciscan regrets deeply, and does 

noi pi. ndals which have been 

arc neither unique nor as great 

and far reaching as t] i have disfigured the history of 

many other towns. V'" York has had her Liexow Committee, 

and Philadelphia is rerj far from sinless, and in the length of 

her sinning and in the amounts involved far exceeds anything 

i San Francisco has reached. Minneapolis, St. Louis. Chi- 

iwns have all had their scandals, and 

of them has ever gone as far in an effort to suppress them 

as this metropo 3 bad enough, but let the 

other city of imp - n cast the first stone. 

This is , in: U it Schmitz, Mayor-that-w«3, 

Mayor-that-is-to-be? He says he is all of 
them. 



GERMEA 



FOR 



BREAKFAST 



THE JOHNSON-LOCKE MERCANTILE COMPANY, AGENTS 



SOMETHING NEW 

MORAGHAN'S 

RESTAURANT AND BUFFET 

24-26 ELLIS STREET, NEAR MARKET 



Member Stock and Bond Exchange. 

Member San Francisco Mining Exchange. 

J. C. WILSON, Broker 

STOCKS AND H[0 N D S 
INVESTMENT SECURITIES 

488 California St., San Francisco. 
Telephone, Temporary 816. KOHL BUILDING. 



A Shipment, of the Highest. Grade of Tea 

Never before fold in this country. Comes from a private plantation in China, and before has 
been used only by the Chinese Royal Family and the wealthy classes of Chinese. This is the 
first opportunity for people of other countries to have for use a finer and better tea than eve r 
before has been allowed to pass out of China. 

YANG-TSE-RIVER TEA CO. 

Refer (o A. S. Froat. 

714 Webster Street, 313 8th Street, Oakland, Cal. 

1859 Post Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

*S- THIS TEA IS UNKNOWN IN CANTON 



UNION LUMBER COMPANY 

REDWOOD AND PINE LUMBER. 
Redwood Ties, Telegraph Poles, Shingles, Split Shakes, Etc. 

Main Office— Monadnock Bldg., San Francisco. 
Yards and Planing Mills— Sixth and Channel Sts., San Francisco. 



BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 
Paper 

1400 to 1450 Fourth St., San Francisco. Telephone Market 3014. 
Private Exchange Connecting all Department*. 



BEKINS VAN AND STORAGE 

Household Goods shipped to or from the East 
and South at reduced rates. 

968 Broadway, Oakland, Cal. 

San Francisco Los Angeles Chicago 



Moyer, Pertibone and Haywood deny everything that Or- 

chard ha- it them. Ii -vhmitz! 



"A FAIR FACE MAY PROVE A FOUL BAR- 
GAIN." MARRY A PLAIN GIRL IF SHE USES 

SAPOLIO 



18 



SAN FKANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 3, 1907. 




'ftiarrfeCncrtHSoCte'denldii Motif 
'One that *ill fky the tktil.sir. vilijon 



Henry B. Knight, chairman of the Board of Supervisors 

of San Joaquin County, killed himself a few days ago. The rea- 
son for his act was that he had been criticised officially. He had 
been accused of standing in with a corporation, but there was no 
proof, and in fact all the circumstances went to show that he 
had been an honest Supervisor. But so sensitive was he that he 
committed suicide. One cannot help contrasting him with the 
case-hardened crew that make up the boodling Supervisors of 
San Francisco. They were not only accused of crimes, but are 
guilty by their own confessions. Have any of them attempted 
suicide? Hardly. The general public would return thanks if 
the whole lot of them would leave this world by the shortest 
possible route. But nothing like this can be hoped for. They 
will remain with us, to brazenly strut, none of them having the 
grace to be ashamed of their criminal acts. Of course, according 
to Heney, capitalists "made Box ton a criminal, made Nicholas 
a criminal, made bakery wagon driver Lonergan a criminal.'' 
Heney talks of these Supervisors being debauched. You cannot 
corrupt a sewer unless by throwing a Supervisor into it. All 
this talk about leading those Supervisors astray is the veriest rot. 
They were criminals by instinct, some of them by practice, before 
they went into office. Their first act was to go forth and see 
what chance there was for a hold-up. So, considering their 
calibre, there is no hope that any of them will follow the ex- 
ample of Supervisor Knight of Stockton. 

The crushing defeat of Kiehard Cornelius and his de- 
luded union carmen must have unbalanced the Cornelius mind. 
His latest utterances have been becoming more and more idiotic, 
but one of the most -imbecile was this, delivered a few days ago: 
"Calhoun's new men are rapidly leaving the service of the com- 
pany, because there are so few passengers on the cars that they 
do not care to work there any more." That's a wonder, a per- 
fect marvel of accuracy and intelligence. Although knowing 
perfectly well that the strike is ended, and the cause of his fol- 
lowers hopeless, Cornelius, drawing his $4(>5 a week himself, still 
maintains that there is a strike, still keeps his men starving, still 
compels tired union workmen to trudge miles on the streets, still 
makes women with union sympathies ride in bone-jolting bump- 
wagons, and for what? Why, to maintain his own political pres- 
tige, nothing else. Were he to admit that the strike is a failure, 
as everybody else knows that it is, he would instantly lose his 
influence; he would become a has-been, his big salaries would be 
cut off. To maintain his prestige and to hold his salaries, Cor- 
nelius is willing enough to make others suffer indefinitely. 

Once again has a monkey dinner been given at Newport. 

The 0. P. Belmonts were the hosts on this occasion, and an edu- 
cated chimpanzee belonging to an animal trainer in New York 
was the guest of honor. He sat in a chair, wearing conventional 
clothing, used a knife and fork and napkin in the most approved 
style, and altogether conducted himself as well as the idiots who 
attended the dinner. The Society for the Prevention of Cruelty 
to Animals should take cognizance of this case. Primarily, this 
society was formed for the purpose of preventing physical pain 
to animals. But its efforts should be extended so that mental 
cruelty could be prevented. No one will deny that to compel an 
intelligent chimpanzee to associate with people so low in men- 
tality as to give or attend a monkey dinner is a degradation 
imounting to excessive cruelty. 

Not satisfied with their accustomed enormous profits .it 

the expense of their victims' pocketbooks, the possessor of slot 
machines have increased their graft by a simple device. For- 
merly, the few winnings were paid in pasteboard checks, ex- 
changeable for drinks or other merchandise. When a winning 
was made, the proprietor was out some of his stock, even if the 
customer did pay a huge price for it. Now this is changed. 
Winnings are paid in brass checks, exactly the size and shape of 
a nickel.' Result: The brass checks go back into the slot and 
are lost one after the other. The proprietor gets back even the 
few checks he has paid out. The customer ? Oh, he just scratches 

his head as he goes away, and wonders how he stands, and 

does the same thing over again. 



Mayor Taylor may just as well throw up his hands, step 

down and out, vamoose. There is no hope for him. He has 
met with the disapproval of that ridiculous little gnat, E. P. E. 
Troy. If Troy disapproves of the new Mayor, why, the new 
Mayor's usefulness is gone. Dr. Taylor bad hardly been named 
for the vacant mayoralty wdien little Troy began excitedly but- 
ton-holing anybody who" would pay any attention to him, and 
squealing about some past act of Dr. Taylor, which, of course, 
was in every case a most commendable act. Being commendable, 
it of course aroused the little fellow's ire. I believe that in bis 
dreams Troy's diseased imagination can almost picture himself 
as Mayor. Troy would be a comical little clown if be were not 
such an insufferable bore. 

A painting, done in 1690 by Antonio Palomino, has been 

found in a Los Angeles museum, and there is great excitement 
in the art world. The painting hung in the museum for years, 
and the identity of its creator was not known-. Recently, in 
cleaning it, the signature of Palomino was found. Immediately, 
the painting became valuable. Just why is not apparent to the 
ordinary mind. A picture should be judged by its artistic 
merit alone. If a sign painter can turn out a good landscape 
it should have the same value as one of equal merit done by U) 
old master. But the average art gallery visitor is net capable of 
judging a picture except according to the signature on it. 

If there are any Missourians among the union labor peo- 
ple, they should surely want to know about that big automobile 
used by J. H. Bowling. Secretary-Treasurer of the Carmen's 
Union. Bowling's salary is $80 a month, scarcely enough upon 
which to maintain an automobile. During the strike, while there 
was a strike, he was in it day and night, running about town. 
Presumably the strike benefit fund paid for it. Now Bowling 
has either "bought or leased an automobile, for he has the same 
one all the time. It is apparently his personal property. Where 
did the money come from for this? 

"The races can't be beaten — I've tried it Erom all ends 

of the game, but I can't make the money hold. The races can'l 
be beaten." No, it was not an innocent g 1 thing, nor a com- 
mon, ordinary victim of the race track swindle thai said those 
words. It was none other than the notorious Riley Grannan, 
plunger, race-track gambler and all-around -pert, who made — 
and lost — several small fortunes on the track, lie is now dead 
broke in New York. If Grannan says that, it is certainly true. 

A Qreek, ignorant of the customs of the country, is in 

jail on the charge of trying to bribe a San Francisco policeman. 
The officer caught him with a revolver in his possession and 
placed him under arrest. The Creek slipped a silver dollar into 
the policeman's hand and asked to be released. Poor, miserable, 
ignorant Creek, to think that he could bribe one of our upright 
guardians of the law with a dollar! Any San Francisco police- 
men would scorn to be caught taking anything less than five. 




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August 3, 1907. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



PLEASURED 
WAND 




'T&oberao wsd dot Pk&surGr ' 



To those who like it. the lady-like drama at the Alcazar pre- 
sents a thrilling dramatic situation, to which Miss Ellie Shan- 
non (Iocs full justice in her usual style. She rises to the occasion 
in the third act, where she is locked in the apartments of her 
vrould-be lover, a former friend, with whom she had been on 
terms of fast-growing intimacy before she met her fate in her 
husband, Lord Harding. Innocent in her friendship for her 
former suitor, she allows him to think she is willing to sacrifice 
herself to him to save her husband. Miss Shannon's acting is 
rather uneven at times, but she warms to £er subject in her 
natural manner, and never wholly disappoints her audience. 

Herbert Kelcey is always himself, stereotyped as to perfection 
of voice and gesture. He is the mustached hero or villain as the 
case may require, but always mustached. Is not his art worth 
the sacrifice of the hirsute adornment, one wonders. 

The ingenue, Miss Levering, is tiresome only because of the 
mistake of the author of the play in giving her dialogues of too 
long continuance. John Mahcr, as her father, shares in this, 
though it is not his fault, lie is the old beau to the life. The 
two widows, and the husband and American lover, are necessary 
In the story, and the interest of the play cannot be questioned, 
and on the whole, the parts are so sustained that that interest 
never flags. 

* * * 

The management of the Greek Theatre is to be congratulated 
on the greai success achieved by Maude Adams in "l/Aiglon," 
under their auspices. While Miss Adams's support, apart from 
thai given by George Osbourne, was exc Mngly poor, the play 





Cyril Scott in "The Prince Chap" at the Van Ness Theatre. 

itself was a splendid success. The acting of Ernest Lawford 
as Metterinck, was simply execrably poor, and the rest of the 
company followed this actor's lead in unworth. Miss Adams 
scored a triumph in the fourth act, in which she and Osbourne 
practically carry the whole play, that cannot be portrayed in 
words. 

She had her audience enthralled, and all the demerits of net 
support were forgotten in the salves of applause, the shouts and 
thunders of praise, showered on the little woman who gave the 
world so perfect a "L'Aiglon." 






the Orpkeum next week-. 



®hr 



laliimiin 




u 



The singing and sustaining qualities of the Baldwin are incom- 
parable. 

c/1 careful investigation will prove to you conclusively that no 
other piano has a tone to be compared with the Baldwin. Its in- 
dividuality is supreme. 
D. H. BALDWIN tCO, 1569 Van Ness Ave., Cor. California 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTBE 



August 3, 1907. 




When the season is at hand for the summer vacation, the 

busy house-wife puts her house in order. The best way to do 
this is to enlist the services of the Spaulding Carpet Cleaning 
Works, of 925 Golden Gate avenue. Promptness and thorough- 
ness are the qualifications that have given this firm its splendid 
reputation. Don't forget the number. 

The time for the re-opening of the universities grows 

apace. In this connection it may be observed that many students 
become good athletes, lots of them acquire hoodlum manners, 
and a few are worthy of diplomas. 

THE STAR HAIR REMEDY, the best tonic; restores color to gray 
hair; stops falling; cures dandruff; grows new hair. All druggists. 



Mr. Herbert Kelcey at the New Alcazar Theatre. 

This coming week at the New Alcazar Theatre, William Gil- 
lette's original version of "Sherlock Holmes," dealing with the 
mysterious case of Miss Falkner, will be played by Mr. Herbert 
Kelcey and Miss Effie Shannon, supported by the stock favorites. 
Mr. Kelcey and Miss Shannon starred in this play for two full 
seasons, and they are sure to give a delightful production on 
Monday evening. Mr. Kelcey will play the title role, while Miss 
Shannon is cast in the role of Miss Faulkner. Besides these 
excellent parts, there are those of the famous Dr. Watson, Pro- 
fessor Moriarity and the rest of Conan Doyle's delightful char- 
acters. 

* * * 

Cyril Scott, one of the most capable and attractive actors in 
this country, is announced to appear at the Van Ness Theatre 
for two weeks, beginning Monday, in "The Prince Chap," a play 
that has the reputation of being the most interestingly human 
piece seen in New York in many seasons. Playgoers by this time 
must have become somewhat familiar with its title. New York 
stores have popularized the title by their many novelties labeled 

"Prince Chap." 

• * • 

The bill at the Orpheum for the week beginning this Sunday 
matinee is of extraordinary strength, novelty and variety. 
Grace Van Studdiford, who heads it, is no stranger in this city ; 
in fact, in no part of the American continent is she more popu- 
lar than in San Francisco. Of all the star comic opera prima 
donnas in this country she is decidedly the best, and the great 
hits she scored in the O'Farrell Street Orpheum and in the 
production of "The Bed Feather" at the Columbia Theatre on 
Powell street, are well remembered. Miss Van Studdiford's 
triumphs in the East have been numerous of late, and her re- 
ception here is sure to he most flattering. James 0. Barrows and 
John Lancaster will be a most attractive and popular feature 
of the new show. Their offering will consist of a one-act rural 
play called "Thanksgiving Day," by which the New York and 
Chicago press stamp as one of the best contributions to vaude- 
ville. The Bessie Valdare troupe of bicyclists, one of the great 
sensations of the vaudeville stage, will be seen for the first time 
in this city. Their act is entirely novel, and has proved tre- 
mendously successful in the East. 



The Hotel Bafael has never enjoyed so great a run of de- 
sirable patronage as during the present season. It begins to look 
as if Manager Orpin would have a full register for the rest of 
the summer season, and the universal satisfaction expressed by 
the San Francisco business men who have made the Bafael their 
summer home prophesies a splendid booking for the cominc fall 
and winter, for the Rafael is open the year round. 



COR. SUTTER AND 
STEINER STS 



New Alcazar Theatre 

ABSOLUTELY "CLASS A" BUILDING. Tel. West 603* 

BELASCO & MAYER. Owners and Managers. 
Commencing Monday, August 5th. Twenty-first week New Al- 
cazar Stock Company, presenting Mr. Herbert Kelcey and Miss 
Etfle Shannon in William Gillette's original version of 

SHERLOCK HOLMES 
Prices — Evening, 25c. to $1; matinees, Saturday and Sunday, 
25c. to 50c. 

August 12 — Farewell week Mr. Herbert Kelcey and Miss Eftle 
Shannon. 
Coming, August lyth— MR. DENIS O'SULLIVAN. 



Orpheum 



ELLIS ST., NEAR FILLMORE, 



Week beginning Sunday afternoon, August 4th. Matinee every 
day. 

tA VAUDEVILLE REVELATION 
Grace Van Studdiford, America's greatest comic opera prima 
donna; Barrows- Lancaster Co.. in Edmund Day's rural comedy, 
"Thanksgiving Day;" Bessie Valdare Troupe of Cyclists; The 
Brittons; World and Kingston; Gaston and Green; Five Musical 
Byrons; new Orpheum Motion Pictures, and last week of the tre- 
mendous sensation, the famous comedy acrobats, Seymour and 
Hill. 

Prices — Evenings, 10c, 26c, 50c, 75c Box seats, $1. 
Matinees (except Sundays and Holidays), 10c, 25c, 50c 
Phone, West 6000. 



Van Ness Theatre 



CORNER VAN NESS AVE. 

AND GROVE STREET 

GOTTLOB. MARX & CO.. Prop«. and Mrm, Phon* Market GOO 

Beginning Monday. August 5. Matinees Wednesdays and Satur- 
days. SPECIAL — Wednesday matinee at 50c. to $1.50. Samuel 
Claggett presents CYRIL SCOTT, In the London and New York 
success, 

THE PRINCE CHAP 

By Edward Peple. Seats. $2 to 60c 
Watch for "The Man of the Hour." 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Gould & Curry Mining Company. 
Location of principal place of Busline. Sari Francisco, Cal. Location 
of Works, Virginia City. Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the 10th day of July, 1907. an assessment (No. 9) of 10 cents per 
share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, payable im- 
mediately In United States gold coin to the secretary, at the office of the 
company, room 119, No. 339 Bush street, San Francisco, California. 
Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on the 
14TH DAY OF AUGUST, 1907, 
will be delinquent and advertised for sale at public auction, and unles; 
payment is made before, w,lll be sold on TUESDAY, the 10th day of Sep- 
tember, 1907, to pay the delinquent assessment, together with the cost o 
advertising and expenses of sale. 
By order of the Board of Directors. 

J. B. SHAW. Secretary. 
Office — Room 119, No. 339 Bush street, San Francisco, California. 



NEW TITLES 

Added to Oar Special Sale of SI. 50 Books (or 50 Gents 

Returns from our advertisement in the News Letter for July were 50 
satisfactory that we have decided to continue the sale during the month 
of August, and sell any of the books mentioned below — ordinarily sold 
for from $1.50 to $1.08— for 50 cents each. Among the titles are: 

The House of a Thousand Candles — Nicholson. 

Watchers of the Trail— C. G. D. Roberts. 

Heart of the Ancient Wooq — C. G. D. Roberts. 

Adventures of Sherlock Holmes — Conan Doyle. 

Return of Sherlock Holmes — Conan Doyle. 

The Castaway — Rives. 

Hearts Courageous — Rives. 

My Fi'iend Prospero — Henry Harland. 

The Lady Paramount — Henry Harland. 

Babs the Impossible — Grand. 

The Great Mogus — Louis Tracy. 

The Stowemarket Mvsterv — Louis Tracy. 

The Circular Study — A. K. Greene. 

Ghosts I have Met — John Kendrick Bangs. 

Sorrows of Satan — Correlll. 

The Soul of Lillth, Correlll. 

Breaking the Shackles — Frank Barrett. 

Captain Jackman — Clarke Russell. 

The Octopus — Frank Nnrris. 

The Pit — Frank Norrls. 

The Aristocrats — Gertrude Atherton. 

The Ca'ifornians — Gertrude Atherton. 



Bring this list 

BLAKE'S 

Book Store 

646 Van Nets Arenue 

between Turk and 

Golden Gate 



August 3, 1907. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



11 



utljp 3lni>uatnal tyeat? (Enngrriis 



Bi [sidob Jacobs, of tite California Canneries Co. 

Do we believe in organization? It is the trend of the times. 
Systems and methods are changing in order to smooth oyer 
many differences of the pasl and apply up-to-date ideas in keep- 
ing with our age. Are we lending our assistance to the pervad- 
ing plan that, in its accomplishment, is placing our grea 

try in a position that is enviable and second to none in the world, 
no matter how advantageously situated? It is acknowledged on 
all sides that industrial peace everywhere is an absolute neces- 
sity for the preservation of our industries. It is also acknow- 
ledged that industrial peace must come, not on any terms, or ar 
any cost, but from the standpoint and basis of right and equity, 
otherwise it could not and would not be permanent. It is ac- 
knowledged that industrial peace is more necessary in our city 
now than at any previous time in its history, owing to the greai 
work necessarily ahead of us in upbuilding and rehabilitation. 
Unless this industrial peace can be brought about in such a way 
and on such a basis as will instill confidence in the minds of 
capitalists throughout the world, outside capital will not be in- 
vested here, and the rehabilitation of our city will be retarded 
for many years. The sufferers through this will be both capital 
and labor, as in this matter their interests are, and necessarily 
must be, mutually interdependent. Will we be able to bring 
about permanent industrial peace based on equity and justice? 
That remains to be seen. If personal and ulterior motives could 
be eliminated, if political ambitions could be cast out, and all 
would work for the common good, then success would crown our 
efforts. We can at least make the effort to bring about a con- 
summation that sooner or later must prove successful. Most 
deeds worthy of record have been originated ami successfully 
launched, only after various attempts and failures, simply be- 
cause the attempts were made at the psychological moment, when 
everybody was in the mood to receive, accept and adopi such 
innovations, but if taken at the time and tide that leads to for- 
tune, success will be assured from the outset, and failure is im- 
possible. "Time, tide and affairs wait for no man." If a De- 
claration of Independence could be signed declaring it to be the 
intention of all interested from now on to abolish on all sides, 

and in all phases of life, unreasonable, selfish and unjust th- 

ods, which have heretofore been the custom, and adopt in their 

stead rational, just, equitable, I si and reputable methods, 

which would elevate the standing of all to a position second 
to none, then the ship of industrial peace could easily be brought 
to a peaceful harbor. 

The question we are engaged in is a nev one. It has been 

pondered over in the minds of thinking men the world over Eo 
o;iiu years, 1 1 has been discussed indn iduallj and collectively, 
ami all who have given the slightest consideration to the sub- 

, 'ire Jl;!! e\ iU do e\lM on 1 he Side 'if e:np!o\e!'s :!lhl 

earners, li certainly should not he impo ogether 

on some just, common ground, and adopt on both sides 
standard of methods that will bring about the same im] 

I nudii io;i- that have result '''re. 

I believe in thi of labor, becai >n and 

higher standing o aeans prosperit] in our country. To 

■ ■ tin the dignity ol labor and elevate it to its I 
Fulness, the methods must be right, fair, just, free from 
dice, and eqnitab i with capital, for to main- 

nity. it must use methods 
and just. The standing of both capita] and labor musl be raised 
to a higher that qualities can be determined and ac- 

corded under mof ible circumstances, In thi 

doubt and uncertainty would be elimina 

asserted that to think of bringing about 
is Utopian. So have been many other things 
in this world. However, when we look back at the expel 
of the past in various movements .md events throi a 
we tind that nearly everything that 1 
■ time or anoth 
ridicule. Tt is frequently - hat many things 

attempted before, but have never pro ill, but th 

e fact that man liculed and eo: 

: and 

he best and wises tlut lj is 



"U' others for holding opin- 
tnd convictions differing from our own. Our work should 
be to ' other, and not to criticise, judge or condi D 

quest ion v us is one which many pi 

have tried io solve, and on which many advocates of industrial 

peace differ, li tern to be rerj plain that it is merely a 

question oi meet in I: on i as l&ey exist, while worl in 

Initially to improve them, and in due time everything must he 
radicated thai is contrary to the principle of right and justice. 
Submission to right does not mean submission to one's person- 
ality. It is possible for one to bec< = so unshaken in his ideas 

as to become dogmatic and stubborn in bis attitude towards those 
who differ from him, a position that is not helpful to any one. 

Those who are wholly governed by right must necessarily work 
together for harmony, allowing their mutual differences to exist 
amicably instead of engendering strife and bitterness. 

As our temperaments, training and education differ from each 
other, it takes time to come out from the influence of former 
Ideals and beliefs, but this should not prevent us from uniting 
for the common good of our community. 

The differences that arise in the association of individuals 
could easily be adjusted by a willingness to meet each other al all 
times in a spirit of fairness, and to make a generous allowance 
for the different aspects which the same thing may present to 
different persons. One thing we all may agree upon is to be 
governed in all our deliberations by wisdom and right. It is the 
privilege of all to be so deeply concerned in the future industrial 
redemption of our community that personal opinions or prefer- 
ences become insignificant. Our salvation will never be accom- 
plished until we work it out ourselves according to the principle 
of right, equity and fairness. In order to bring this about, we 
must cherish nothing inimical to our own or another's good, to 
express nothing unworthy of ourselves. Egotism, stubbornness 
and pride may deceive self, mistake personal domination for the 
reign of right, and personal homage for justice, but these vanities 
do not forward permanent industrial peace in our community or 
help to bring it about. True wealth can never be gained by 
trampling on the rights of others, or by taking advantage of 
each other. The right to one's self is the basis of that liberty 
of self-preservation which is universally claimed and instructive- 
ly exercised, and this right is generally regarded as both 
national and inviolable, Nevertheless, every stage and degree' 
oi' enslavement is found among those who are most prompt to 
assert and most ready to defend this liberty. Their conduct re- 
peals the 1'ael that, though they are entirely right in their desire 
to better and improve their condition, in their desire for freedom 
and in their assertion of it, they are wholly wrong in their 
method of application of the principle involved, without the 
proper application of which they cannot secure results that will 
furnish .1 stable ground foi ever] exigenc] and experience thai 
may arise. Until we are willing to look into all problems with a 
spirit of conciliation and from the standpoint of right, self- 
preservation becomes a struggle the same as it is among the ani- 
mal world. 

It is a truism to all of us, if we reflect for a u nt. thai we 

are each of us se I striving and struggling, for ■.■ 

For wealth? STot at all. I for happiness, for content- 

ment. We shall never Becure these by striving against 
other, : nave our 1/ red to work 

out our own salvation by recognizing the good in ir, and 

acting fairly and jr- 

If those 1 ' tdmit that evils ovist, and 

should ability and 

capability to bring about better conditions, without encroaching 
upon th 

bring about better conditions, which are 
ized as absolutely necessary, we will save our ship from 
What ' independence of ch 

less moral cowardice. We should speak right out at all time 

and not conceal them, and in so doing, i-sue to the 
ation of ine . which would mean much 

to every man. woman and child in our n 
know that capital and 

California are working together to uplift our city and our - 
and no 10 imagine the great future th 

11s, and with all wor' ?r, confidence will b 

capital will seek investment in our midst, and the future .- 
and prosperity of our citj and al' i 1 - citizens of ail 
be assured. 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 3, 1907. 




ANITE 



^JL^^msu-.. 



The high prices of potatoes, beans, onions and other vegetables 
have caused the cultivators of the islands of the Sacramento 
river to expect a year of great prosperity. Every available tract 
of land in the Sacramento River island region is being culti- 
vated, and it is probable that the river steamers will be unable 
to convey all the freight that will be offered to them during the 
coming fall Even if prices should drop and only regular rate's^ 
be received for the crops, the amount of money that will pass 
into the hands of the growers will be greater than in any pre- 
vious year. Notwithstanding their losses by inundation, the 
growers have planted on a greater scale than ever before, and 
will send an enormous crop to market. One of the most import- 
ant of the island crops is celery, with which between GOO and 
700 acres will be planted. The task of clearing the island tvaets 
of water was a long and arduous one, but was accomplished at 
last by the use of very powerful pumping plants. The famous 
Jersey Island tract, noted for its fertility, lies to the east of An- 
tioch, and comprises nearly four thousand acres. The plant by 
which this was cleared of flood waters consisted of one 41-inch 
pump, eight syphons of large capacity, as well as flood-gates and 
flood boxes. The work occupied eighty-three days. 

* * * 

When going to the country or to the sea-shore, it is well to 
know that a simple, and sure cure for sunburn is Epsom salt?, 
dissolved in water. A ten cent package to a pint of water is the 
right proportion. It should be applied to the burned parts with 
a soft cloth. It will be found cool and refreshing, removing all 
redness and burning sensation in one or two applications. 

* * * 

In Long Beach, the Young Women's Christian Association is 
wide awake in looking after young girls in their midst. At Hie 
pavilion dances, girls congregate to have a good time, and young 
fellows of a sporty nature have been taking advantage to make 
the acquaintance of girls who go unchaperoned to these places, 

The officers of Long Beach keep an eye on this crowd, and 
allow no strolls on the beach after 11 o'clock at night, under 
penalty of arrest. Then these young fellows conceived the plan 
of taking boat trips to San Pedro, where liquor is freely poll. 
returning about midnight. The Y. W. C. A. heard of the do- 
ings, and at once took a hand in the affair. Forming committees 
to go to the pier, they were at their post every night until th" 
whole business was broken up. The girls were saved from dis- 
grace without any publicity, and the young fellows routed. 

* * * 

Two young men were on the Oakland ferry the other day hav- 
ing a heart-to-heart talk. It was evident they had been school- 
mates and chums. Both had married within the last year. The 
first speaker said: 'Yes, I am very happy, but there are certaifi 
stages we young married men must pass through until matters 
finally adjust themselves, as they certainly do. Fannie is thf 
sweetest and dearest little wife in the world. Her only fault lies 
in the line of cooking. Now, I am a strong, hearty fellow, and 
care little for dainties. 

"I am awfully fond of substantial dishes, like corn beef and 
cabbage, pork and beans, beefsteak and onions, but such coarse 
vulgar dishes never adorn our dinner table. I possess the ap- 
petite of a plow-boy for such food, but never get it. except at 
a restaurant, where it does not taste like the home-cooked 
dishes, and I would give anything if my wife could understand 
my taste in food. The salads, fancy cookery she serves at dinner 
are perfect of their kind, but I often Ions for a good, substantia] 
meal with less style. If I were to hint at such a thin:.', shi 
would take it as a rebuke and crv herself sick, so what is a fellow 
to do?" 

The boat reached the pier before the friend had time to 
answer, and they walked off the boat arm in arm. Fannie was 
probably busy at home making an "angel cake" for his dinner. 

* * * 

When Miss Skaggs of Oakland alighted from a Telegraph 
Avenue car one night several weeks ago, she found fastened to 



her dress a gentleman's gold watch and chain. The eircum- 
Btance was immediately reported to the police department with 
the desire to return the watch to its owner. At the time the 
police claimed that it was the first case of its kind on record. 
In this they were mistaken, as the same occurrence took place 
a few years since in San Francisco. Mrs. Ensign Taylor, nee 
Miss Lobby Pascoe, of Oakland, one of the most reliable officers 
in the ranks of the Salvation Army, was returning to her home 
at the. close of a meeting, and boarded a car with the theatre 
crowd. She was forced to stand in a packed car, and when she 
alighted, noticed something dangling from the button of her 
cloak, and it was found to be a valuable gold watch and chain. 
It was well advertised, but never claimed. The theory was. that 
a pick-pocket had a confederate in the crowd, and in passing it 
hack, it caught in Mrs. Taylor's coat button, where it hung. 
It was a lady's watch, and could not have accidentally Fallen 
from the owner's pocket into the position it was found. 

* * * 

Within another week, fifty-five fine vestibuled chair cars will 
arrive here for the Southern Pacific Company, and will he iiscl 
on the lines down the Peninsula. One hundred and fifty more 
will arrive during the summer. This will be good news to the 
people of San Jose and Palo Alto and the intermediate towns. 
With a double track and the opening of the Bay Shore cut-off, 

which will -non he completed, travel down the Peninsula will he 

a delight, as it is intended to give rapid service on half-hourly 
trains, ft will be possible to live ill San .Ins.. and do business in 
San Francisco with no more loss of ti llle than is entailed by liv- 
ing in the trans-bay suburbs. 

* * * 

If these hold-ups of mountain tag - continue, the managers 

of resorts will soon be advertising somewhat as follows: "Hold- 
ups guaranteed on our stage line. We have (he most picturesque 
bandits in our employ. Tourists are advised to send cash and 
valuables ahead by express, keening just enough money to make 
the hold-ups realistic. What is lost in this way may he looked 
upon in the nature of a tip, as we pay our bandits salaries. Ex- 
tra charges will be made for the privilege of taking snap-shots." 

* * * 

The Southern Pacific Company is to build on the Oakland 
estuary one of th,. largest and most complete power plants in 
the United States. The building will occupy nearly l block 100 
feet square, and in it is hi he generated the power that is to 
operate the electric lines that the company expects to establish 
in Oakland, Berkeley, Alameda ami Fruitvale. This improve- 
ment of suburban lines. will give a great impetus in the growth 
of Alameda County suburbs. Berkeley, so far, has been forging 
ahead more rapidly than Alameda, mainly mi account of superior 
train service. But. with an electric line giving rapid service, 
there is no reason why the Fncinal city should not have a health-.- 
boom. And the countrv around Fruitvale should build up 
rapidly. There is no healthier place across the bay than the 
foothill country around Fruitvale. where fugs aiel heavy wind- 
are almost unknown. There is room there Eor tens of thousands 
of commuters who will flock in as fast as transportation is fur- 
nished them. In fact, pioi r commuters are there now by the 



An exceptional opportunity is presented for a limited number of 
young ladies to visit Europe to study French and special subjects 
under the best of Paris masters while enjoying the comforts of an 
attracttve home, and to travel on the Continent under the chaper- 
onage of 

Madame BOUGOUIN 

nee Sanford 

who is eminently well qualified to assume these responsibilities, by 
long residence abroad and a thorough knowledge of French. 

As time for making arrangements is limited, those interested 
are invited to communicate at once with c^Wadame Bougouin's 
Western representative, tTWrs. I. M. C. Smith, 432 N. Fifth St., San 
Jose, who will be pleased to give full particulars. Highest referen- 
ces given and required. 



August 3, 1907. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



13 



thousands, enduring the inconvi 

. . ars mi aceounl of . he bealthfulness of the climate. They 
are thr ones who will derive the greatesl benefit from tb 
velopment of this country, for the land that they bought cheap 
will increase many fold in value. 



It 



ffitbraro, ®ablt 

Ouida has been granted a pension of $750 per year by the 
British Government, and it is to be hoped that the last years of 
this old author may be spent in peace. Few of us but do not owe 
a debt to her for the delight derived from "Under Two Flags." 
The tall, god-like heroes and beautiful heroines that stalked 
through the pages of Louise De La Rame's romances won our 
hearts and sympathies, and even now, when we have reached the 
analytical noval stage, our pulses still beat in response to the 
ratatatat of Cigarette's horse, when she dashes across the stage 
with the pardon for Bertie. But Ouida has done much more 
than write adventurous romances. No sweeter bit of sentiment 
is to be found in modern literature than in the story of "Beebee 
or Two Little Wooden Shoes," and "Puck, a Dog of Flanders," 
has been called an artistic triumph. "Ouida" stands for a cer- 
tain age, the age of adolescence, when nothing, pleases but super- 
latives, and perfection seems not unreachable. She created men 
and women that were types of her ideals and tried in every way 
to live her own life as her characters did in her romances. When 
money was plentiful, she spent it in gratifying her passion for 
dogs and horses, lived at splendid villas, spent a fortune fighting 
law-suits as a matter of principle, and when reverses overcame 
her in her old age, she deprived herself of food to bestow it upon 
the three dogs that are the solace of her misery. Partly blind, 
partly deaf, dependent now on the charity of friends and well- 
wishers, the picture of Ouida in her dotage is one to rouse 
feelings of sympathy in all who have passed delightful days in 

company with her romantic creations. 

* * * 

In a more or less apocryphal story as to how James Whitcomh 
Riley wedged his way into literature, '"Lite,'" in a recent issue, 
relates that the poet of Hoosierdom's first appearance in print 
was by means of a metrical effusion advertising the wares of a 
clothing merchant, named Jacob Stein, as follows: 

"Yawcob Stein, 

Dot friend of mine 

Who sells dose clodings down so fine." 
Mr. Riley has written much verso since he penned this three 
line eulogy of Mr. Stein, but nowhere has he achieved more sin- 
cerity el' sentiment or greater perfection of dialect than in this 
maiden effort. Perhaps nothing that he has written will endure 
quite so well, as its very simplicity will serve I" keep it alive as 
one of the Eoosier poet's representative masterpieces. 

* * * 

"Short Cruises." by W. W. Jacobs, is fully equal to any of this 
English humorist's previous work. The same whimsicality of 
view point, the same presentation of quaint and curious charac- 
ters, and the same originality el' treatment that made "Many 
Cargoes" and "More Cargoes" entertaining unbine to 

make Mr. Jacob's "Short I ro sea" pleasant journeys to venture 

upon. 

* » • 

1 1 is hardly fair to condemn William Jennings Bryan's oratory 

mere!* because Me j i; ! I n declared in- 

sane ,i, a result of memorizing the Nebraska's Peerless Perennial 
Speeches. May not the fact ft mceived the idea of corn- 

ea 9 p ee i i, ired conclusive 

evide insanity? 

The wicked howl becansi t ample c 

vice on Sunday, and the pious think ••damn it" because the 

«,, , against their good clot i I >r old Pat Cal- 

houn. 



Checking Accounts 



"N 



We solicit the Bank accounts of individuals, 
firms and corporations and pay interest at the 
rate of 2 per cent per annum on balances. 

We pay 4 per cent interest on Savings {Re- 
counts. 

Capital and Surplus over $3,000,000.00. 

Total Assets over $12,000,000.00. 

California Safe Deposit and Trust 
Company 



CALIFORNIA AND MONTGOMERY STS. 
Branches: 
1740 Fillmoro St. 19th unci Minnesota St 

1521 DeTlsadero St. 2572 Mission St. 



^ 



• 



A get-rich-quick woman of New York says she is going 

to Europe to buy some old ruins. She should come and look 
over San Francisco's assortment before sailing. Schmitz, Ruef 
and about a score of soiled Supervisors make a good showing 
of the real brand of ruins. 



Fabric 



Cretonnes 

Rugs and Carpets 

Wall Paper 

TAYLOR-SINCLAIR. CO. 

Bush at, Van Ness 



A DAT AND BOARDINT 


SCHOOL FOR BOYS 


RUGBY 


MILITARY 
A C A DEM Y 


CAVALRY 


Opens August 15. 1907 


Ward. Ellsworth. Derby 
BIRIILI1 


and Pojtou - 

L1FORMA 


For full information and catalog address the commandant 



Something New 



The Sultan Turkish Baths 



Post St., between Taylor and Jones 



Entire 7 story 
class zA fire- 
proof building 
devoted to the 
luxuries of men 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 3, 1907. 




A friend, who usually butters her afternoon tea with the sort 
of conversation that makes one hasten briskly in that direction 
at Oolong time, was holding forth the other day on rough-shod 
matrimony. She has as crisp an outlook on life as the muffins 
she serves, and you are sure to leave with a re fresh i ugly new 
view-point, even when the conversation turns on that hackneyed 
subject — the "marry"-go-round. "I don't understand, 
said, "why the cynic saddles society girls with the sole right to 
mercenary ideas about matrimony. Now. as a matter of fact, 
the society girl isn't a bit more mercenary than the average girl 
outside of the covers of a book. The idea of nine society girhs 
out of ten is to begin matrimony when- her parents left off, bill 
the idea of most self-supporting girls is to begin where they 
themselves leave off — plus a neat margin. The stenographer 
earning $80 a month doesn't spend her evenings dreaming of 
love in a vine-covered cottage for which she helps earn the rent 
by doing her own housework and clicking the typewriter even- 
ings. The fact that money makes the domestic wheels go round 
without a creak, is appreciated by all classes and kinds of women. 
Girls in society are not any keener about it than the girls who 
just have a reading acquaintance with the smart set. 

"The cynic always jumps at conclusions, and frequently he 
doesn't land on both feet. The moment a girl marries a wealthy 
man he concludes that it is a loveless marriage. Contrary to a 
somewhat general opinion, there are men with money who can 
inspire in their wives a genuine affection that is not uphol- 
stered with 'tainted money.' And after all. it's a question 
whether it's worse to marry for money or without any money at 
all. The marriages under my observation that have turned out 
worst have been the romantic sort, where girls accustomed to 
luxury have married incapable chaps with no income and costly 
habits. There are always a lot of such young men in society — 
men who would consider ordinary ways of making a living 'vul- 
gar,' and so thev exist by catching crumbs from rich men's 
tables." 

[n the discussion which followed, we cited several instances 
which aptly boosted the argument of our hostpss. Wie all re- 
called a particularly flagrant example of two young people with 
expensive habits and a meagre income who married fnr love 
a couple of years ago. They are now said to bo steering their 
matrimonial craft very close to the danger shore. The young 
wife's father is a man able to feather the home nest luxuriously, 
but his income is not sufficient to handsomely dower each daugh- 
ter on marriage, and so she cannot "begin where her parents 
left off," and as a result, the gossips hint that Discord camps on 
the door mat. 

There is another side of the shield which wo turned tor the 
edification of our hostess. There have been some shining exam- 
ples of happy marriages between the daughters of wealthy men 
and comparatively poor Benedicts. But in every instance we 
could cite, the husband has not been a hanger-on in society, 
dangling after the latest fads, but an earnest professional man 
of some sort, seriously pursuing a career. Mrs. Kierstadl ( Edith 
MeBean), who is expected on a visit home shortly, is one of 
those shining examples. Since her marriage to tin distinguished 
army surgeon, her life lines have not been cast in such soft place? 
as when she was a leader in the most exclusive set of girls in 
San Francisco, but she comes home from out-of-the-way army 
posts looking a perfect sermon on married happiness. The Eier- 
stadts have been in Alaska for a year, s o their friends are more 
than anxious to greet them. 

Mrs. J. Downey Harvey and her daughter Anita have at last 
arrived in San Francisco, their departure from New York having 
been postponed several times on account of the delicate aural 
operation which Miss Harvey was forced to undergo. Rumor 
to the effect that this popular young girl's marriage to Oscar 
Cooper is to be indefinitely postponed is earnestly denied by 
friends of both families. In fact, I hear that Miss Harvey has 
brought home with her an exquisite trousseau — for which pur- 
pose she went to New York months ago. 

Wale there has been practically no entertaining in town this 1 
week, there have been several pleasant affairs in the suburbs 



FRED'R B. VOLZ 



MRS. HELEN FREESE 



Volz $ Freese 



IMPORTERS OF WORKS OF ART 



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Lowestoft. Bristol, Etc., with prices that are attractive. 



Ad Exceptional Opportunity For Wedding; Presents 

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Telephone 2917 FRANKLIN 



to which the town people look for amusement these days. There 
\eral flourishing bridge clubs in San Rafael, as well as 
down Burlingame way. Then there are the Sunday luncheons 
at the Burlingame club house, which have become very popular. 
\ ! tn. .-I everybody entertaining week-end house guests take them 
over to the club house for luncheon, and it makes a pleasant 
break in the day. 

Interesting arrivals in San Francisco who have taken apart- 
ments at the Fairmont Hotel are Mr. and Mrs. D. R. C. Brown, 
of Colorado. Mrs. Brown, as Ruth McNutt, was a very popular 
society girl here. Among her most intimate friends was Vir- 
ginia Joliffe, who was one of those to welcome the Browns on 
their arrival. It was while in Europe with her sister. Mrs. Ash- 
ton Potter, that .Miss McXuit met her husband, who is a wealthy 
mining man with large interests in Colorado. The Browns in- 
tend to spend the fall and winter here, much to the delight of 
Mrs. Brown's old friends. 

Mrs. Sherman T. Blake and family are occupying their cozy 
bungalow, "The Waldruhe," at Brookdale in the Santa Cruz 
Mountains. They expect to spend the greater portion of the 
summer at this beautiful retreat. 

Mrs. Alfred Cohen and daughters, Enid and Hilda, have been 
spending the summer at Hotel Rowardennan, Ben Lomond, in 
the Santa Cruz Mountains. 

Mrs. Emil Sober and her interesting family are guests at 
Lainerhurst, the country home of Mrs. Richard Lainer at Ben 
Lomond. 

You hear much these days about the generous hospitality of 
the Russell Cools, and invitations to their beautiful country 
borne, "Dotswood," in Los Gatos, are eagerly sought. Richard 
Hotaling and .Myron Wolff' recently returned from there. Mrs. 
Ernest Simpson and Mrs. Josephine Austin are more recent 
guests. In fact, there are always guests at "Dotswood," and 
iln ■>, are all enthusiastic over the warm hospitality extended 
by this interesting couple. 

J. Downey Harvey was a recent visitor at Santa Cruz. 

Mrs. Tirey L. Ford, Lewis B. Ford and Tirey B. Ford, Jr., of 
Sacramento, and Miss Kathryn Byington are spending some 
lime at the Sea Beach, in Santa Cruz. 

Miss Florence Pardee, daughter of ex-Governor Pardee of 

Oal land, was the motif of a charming dinner party given by 

Hiss Florence Kron at the famous Casino grill in Santa Cruz, 

recently. Miss Pardee had been a guest at the Kron home for 

time, and the dinner was in the nature of a farewell. 

Mr. John Martin is a frequent visitor to Santa Cruz, where 
he combines business with pleasure. 



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27 Tears at Palace Hotel, now at 1 144 Van Ness Avenue, near Post St. 



Adqpst 3, 1907. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



15 



Honorable William P; Lawlor, Judge of the Superior Court 
of San Francisco, was at Santa Cruz a week ago Eoi a Sunday of 
rest and the enjoyment of the sea atmospl 

Miss Georgie Cope, of Oakland, one of the leading vocalists 
about the bay, was in Santa Cruz recently at a reception tendered 
Exalted Ruler Dr. \Y. R. Linscott and bride (nee Miss Adel of 
San .lose) by the Elks. Miss Cope leaves very soon for Europe 
to complete her musical studies. 

William Letts Oliver, the Oakland banker, has started in his 
White for a two weeks' tour of Southern California. He will 
motor leisurely to Los Angeles and then see the sights in the 
South. 

An engagement of general interest, just announced is that of 
Mrs. M. Dunne-Taaffe to Captain J. R. Pourie, 105th Coast Ar- 
tillery, U. S. A. Mrs. Dunne-Taaffe is the sister of the well- 
known attorney, Peter F. Dunne, of counsel for the Southern 
Pacific, and of J. J. Dunne, Assistant United States District 
Attorney at Honolulu. She has only recently returned to this 
city after some years of travel abroad. The marriage, which has 
been set for September 3d, will take place at St. Dominie 
Church. After the ceremony, the happy couple will leave for 
Alaska on a wedding tour. 



CATERING TO EPICURES. 

In the early sixties, Peter Job's, on Washington street, and 
the Poodle Dog on Dupont street, near Washington, were the 
only noted restaurants in the city. In the eighties, the Palace 
Hotel became the center and was the one place to dine. During 
these forty years the bankers and insurance men have remained 
in practically the one locality around California and Sansome 
streets with no dining place near by arranged for their comfort. 
Ned Fay, the well known caterer, will in a few days open to the 
world right in the middle of the burned district, in the heart of 
the bank and insurance center, tire first high class grill and cafe. 

The furnishings of this grill, for it will be the finest restaurant 
on the Pacific Coast, are magnificent. T he carpets are of heavy 
velvet pile, and are soft and rich to walk upon. Elegant dra- 
peries separate well lighted booths from the three main dining 
rooms, and are so arranged that business men desiring to lunch 
or dine with friends can have all the luxury and privacy of a 
club. An immense kitchen with refrigerators and all the latest 
improvements ami accessories specially constructed and installed 
under the supervision of Jules Harder, the noted chef, whose 
valuable services have been secured by Mx. Fay. Harder is well 
known by reputation to all the bon vivants in town. For many 
years he was chef at the Palace Hotel, where bis ability for ar- 
ranging a menu for one or one hundred earned him a world-wide 
reputation. bay's patrons are to be congratulated on his 
securing this well known master of cuisine to cater to their ap- 
petites, fay's cafe will be the first high-class grill to locate in 
the financial ipiarter. Besides having an entrance direct from 
the Carmen Johnson building, then are entrances from the 
corner of SanBome and I hillock streets, from the corner of Sac- 
ramento and Sansomi and from Halleck street. To 
appreciate the humeri it] of this establishment, the unrivaled 
ln\nr\ and comfort of its furnishings, one musi visit the place 
and enjoy its hospitalities. 

Walter Risley 1 learn has been appointed Consul-Ueneral 

for Greal Britai porl Eoi California, Nevada, Alaska 

ami Arizona, in | ourtney Bennett, the latest incumbent 

recently transferred to New fork. Mr. fleam, who has been 

with the British Consulai comes from 

Havre dc Grace, where he was Consul General for the past four 

B viously fill- - of Consul at Christiana, 

and Bordeaux. 



An Ohio cashier by the name of Bird picked up all there 

was in sight and flew away last week. He left a note saying: 
"I'm going to where birds of a feather flock together." Evi- 
ce, and bad studied the ornithology of 
Honduras. 



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Own A Home 

Ten Minutes Walk From 

Hotel del Monte 

It's now possible for you to own a home within ten 
minutes' walk of Hotel del Monte — the most delightfully 
located hotel in all the world. 

Del Monte is famous for its magnificent seventeen-mile 
drive over mountains and along ocean shore, its forests of 
cypress, pine and oaks, its lake, gardens and lawns, its race 
course, golf links and tennis courts, its swimming pavilion 
and surf bathing in the warm, placid waters of Monterey 
Bay, its fine fishing and hunting; in fact, its hundred 
other features endowed by nature. 

All the charms that go to make Hotel del Monte famous 
can now be enjoyed by you — all are at the very door of the 
home you can now own at 

Del Monte Heights 

Del Monte Heights surround Lake del Rey, a beautiful 
body of water that is soon to be transformed into a minia- 
ture Naples or Venice with boats, gondolas, concert pavil- 
ion and myriads of electric lights. 

Del Monte Heights will have a bath house on the beach 
only a few minutes' walk from where you can own a home. 

All streets will be curbed, graded and oiled. Trees will 
be planted along the side walks. There will be alleys in 
the rear of each lot to carry sewer and water pipes and 
all wires. 

An electric line will be built connecting Del Monte 
Heights with Monterey and Pacific Grove. 

Southern Pacific has a station at Del Monte Heights, 
and a schedule of convenience to all who live in San Fran- 
cisco or the Santa Clara Valley. At present there are many 
trains a day that stop at Del Monte Heights. 

New roads now building between Monterey and Fresno 
will make easy access to Del Monte Heights for people liv- 
ing in the San Joaquin or Salinas Valleys. 

Company has arranged to build your house for you as 
soon as your lot is paid for. Payments on the house like 
paying rent. 

Buy a lot in Del Monte Heights now while prices are the 
very lowest. 

Improvements to a locality bring people — and popula- 
tion makes property more valuable. Buy now and soon 
double your money. 

Lots $100 to $300 all sold on easy terms, some as low as 
$5 down. 

Own a home at Hotel del Monte. Send for booklet giv- 
ing complete information. 

PHELPS-LEWIS CO. 

Geaeral Agents 

French Bank Building, 110 Sutter St., San Francisco. 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 3, 1907. 





Looker on 

■ -vr rir/ . ^r . - . '■'iiV j -'i i 'V l -' i ' . "' - ' : r^ ; r : 'V . V"- . '-- i i" -- ' i '- i 

The Cosmopolitan, the monthly edition of the Hearst papers, 
furnishes a curious confirmation of the story that Hearst came 
West to name a Mayor for San Francisco, but was thrown down 
and immediately turned upon Langdon for his refusal to take 
orders. The news-stand edition of the magazines is published 
and circulated before those copies which are sent to subscribers. 
In the news-stands, copies of the Cosmopolitan for August, and 
in those sent to subscribers, the index contains this statement: 
"The Liberating of San Francisco," three papers by Edward 
Hamilton, William H. Langdon and Joseph J. Dwyer. In the 
news-stand copies the articles named appear. They were printed 
and sent out before the rupture between Hearst and Langdon, 
but in the subscribers' edition the place of the articles named 
are taken by "What Life Means to Me" and "A Marvel of Mod- 
ern Business," neither article being by any one of the three men 
named above. The story is, that Bailey Millard was informed 
over "the longest leased wire in the world" that he must stop the 
presses and substitute something else for the Langdon and other 
essays. Literature a la Hearst is certainly extraordinary, and 
decidedly hard on the editor, who must steer clear of political 
complications in San Francisco, New York, Boston, Los Angeles 

and Chicago. 

* • • 

Discussing the Cosmopolitan, reminds me that the opening 
article (which is in all editions) is by Harold Bolce. Laying 
down the magazine after reading it, 1 picked up an Everybody, 
and found Bolce in there, too, with a discussion on "Bird 
Flight," and later, crossing the bay, I bought an "Uncle Remus,'' 
and found the omnipresent Bolce on hand again. As Bolce is 
a native of Oakland, where he once posed as a preacher for a 
time, got married, went to South Africa at the time of the 
Jamieson raid, and has since been to Japan for Appleton's, and 
to Europe for some other one of the magazines, his success is 
of local interest. He is a peculiar, eccentric genius, who un- 
doubtedly is just where he belongs as a magazine contributor, 
and undoubtedly will, ere long, win a pjace not only of promi- 
nence, but of weight, in literature. His family are residents 

of Oakland at present. 

* * * 

I hear that one of Mr. Cornelius's Schmitzites, who tried 
to murder the two carmen, has been arrested. Of course, the 
union is blameless ! Of course. "Mr. Calhoun paid three strike- 
breakers to murder two other strike breakers to give the union a 
bad name." Seriously, how long is this to go on ? I'll tell you : 
Until Mr. Cornelius is arrested for inciting his followers to 
murder and riot. From what I can gather, the negative proof 
of Dinan's zeal in behalf of law and order is developing into 
positive proof of his practical sympathy with the strikers. His 
arrogance is coupled with a worthlessness that should hasten Jus 
dimissal. He has been boasting of his ability to manage this 
mob, and each boast is followed by a convincing refutation. 
What guarantee has any carman that he will not be murdered in 
the discharge of his duty? Some of the police I know person- 
ally to be bitterly opposed to this strike. They are men who, 
given carte blanche, would speedily end this trouble. I don't 
know Dinan personally. But, like all of us, 1 am somewhat 
acquainted with his official efficiency. 

* * * 

Do San Francisco women "make up?" Not nearly so 
much as formerly. It is rare now that one sees a woman here 
who tries to improve on the cheeks God Almighty painted. To 
the English fogs and exercise the English girl" attributes her 
matchless complexion. Who has a better quality of fog than we, 
and what women spend more time in the open air than ours? 
The average San Francisco girl who daubs her face with drug- 
store "bloom" is "gilding refined gold or painting the lily." 
« * »" 

The heroism and unselfishness displayed by the women of 
the Columbia is not to be wondered at. In woman, pity ban- 
ishes terror, "perfect love casteth out fear." I have been in two 
ship-wrecks, and I saw none of this hysterical raving we read 
so much of. While going into danger, man is braver, because he 



has active courage; when in danger, woman is braver because 
she is endowed with passive courage. Any dentist will support 
my assertion. Yet the courage and self-denial displayed by Mias 
Mabelle Watson was marvelous. But no courage atones for the 
employing of worn-out old buckets like the Columbia. Inspec- 
tion is a farce, because inspectors inspect as they are expected. 
No man is going to imperil his interests by condemning when 
he knows honesty is poor policy. As to bulkheads, how often 
have bulkheads managed by blockheads saved a ship? They 
are always open. As for boats, they are as the man said of the 
boarding house butter: either good enough, what there is of 
them, or a good deal of them such as they are. Ninety per cent 
of these Pacific Coast accidents are caused by full speed in a fog. 

* * * 

Dividing up the spoils has kept the new Mayor about as busy 
as any of his predecessors. The fact that he is not supposed to 
represent faction or party has made no difference to the office- 
seekers. The demands upou him have been as insistent as they 
were upon Schmitz when he took office as the head of the Ruef 
machine. Bankers, brokers, merchants and professional men 
are anxious to serve the city at the usual stipend. Mayor Tay- 
lor can possibly handle these patriots, but he has been embar- 
rassed by an application from an unexpected source. Among 
his visitors Friday there came a member of the jury which con- 
victed Schmitz, L. Weil, a retired merchant, who is anxious to 
lend his services to the task of rehabilitating the municipal Gov- 
ernment. It did not appear from the expressionless face of the 
new executive that he welcomed the sacrifice Weil was willing 
to make. His application, however, will be pigeon-holed with 

others, and it is not likely that it will ever see daylight again. 

* * * 

Hop picking starts in two or three weeks, and there will be 
plenty of opportunities for families to get out into the country 
and gain both health and cash during August ami September. 
The price for picking will be a cent a pound thie year, and at 
that rate an industrious worker can make good wages, besides 
having the benefit of our-door life. Most of the hop-growers 
furnish tents, wood and water to the pickers, whose only ex- 
pense is for food. As a rule, each hop-yard has a dancing pavil- 
ion, and there is always some one who can grind oul music from 
an accordeon or a violin. The phonograph, too, has come in in 
favor as an inspiration for the hop-pickers' feet. Out in the 
hop-fields people are not so particular as they are in town as to 
the quality of the music supplied them. Families do well in the 
hop-yards, moving from one locality to another as the season 
advances. Hops ripen first back from the Coast, or in the 
wanner regions. In Mendocino County, for instance, the season 
starts about August 30th. It ends about September 1st, and by 
that time hops are ripe in Sonoma County. The hop-fields fur- 
nish an excellent opportunity for the refugees, who are to be put 
out of the public parks. 

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AtrocsT 3, 190?. 

I hoar somebody tried to use an mto- 
mobile hearse and was i. Of 

course this absurd objection will disap- 
pear, Inn why Bhould ii have risen? This 
"dignity of death" theory is prettj 
for a little way, but with all my modesty, 
I have oever i idden in anything I 
though! not good enough for any dead 
man; Dor have I known any dead man to 
rid- in anything I thought too good for 

me. I am not aware that death is so one h 
of an improvement on life that anybody 
afflicted witli the disease should lie con- 
sidered superior to others of a more 
vivacious temperament. A corpse is an- 
other name for conservatism, and while 
I should not select a burial as an occasion 
for hilarity or a funeral sermon as a 
subject for parody, 1 cannot see how per- 
manently pumping the wind out of a fel- 
low citizen, unless he be a supervisor or 
a preacher, cm enhance the gentleman's 
dignity or intensify his right to addi- 
tional respect. I can understand why a 
live man, morbidly particular, should ob- 
ject to being translated about the coun- 
try in a hearse, but 1 can't understand 
why a hearse driven by steam or gasoline 
is any more disrespectful to the remains 
Mian a hearse driven by a nigger and 
hauled by a mule. 

* * * 

This "Princess Alice" business is sick- 
ening. So was "Baby MeKee." But if 
they are the essence of vulgar flunkeyism, 
"The First Lady of the Land" is thi 
quintessence. Every woman who has pre- 
sided at the White House was a lady, and 
no lady is pleased with this clumsy, free- 
nigger type of glorification. Then the 
periodica] hand-shaking when the wit' 
of the Chief Executive poses as a town 
pump, her hand shaken by the filthy paw 
of every tramp, ragamuffin and vagabond 
in Washington. Mrs. Longworth must 
he very tired of tin's "princess" mawkish- 
ness. \\V pretend to be the personifica- 
tion of independent spread-eagleism, and 
ho exalt the exalted as if he were a being 

1 1' another sphere; unless he happens 

to he on the other side; then we justify 
the remark of the Englishman who ashed 
during an election, "Win- do you Ameri- 
cans persist in Dominating the two great- 
est criminals for President f" I toes help- 
ing to elect a man obligate him to asso- 
ciate with the men who elected him? 1 
know one man who is not bothered bj 
those u ho el i ed him. They 
in. and he mil's gei mil. 

* * * 

Tin: Blatherskites. 

Some men are born to play buffoon 
And bay like dogs at midnight moon: 
With loll inir tongues they break our 
peace : 

>ds! that they were "beard to cease." 

* * * 

The Palace Bote] syndicate has pli 

an order tor 15,000 tons of structural 

with an Eastern concern. The 1 

der will amount to J 
000, and it ie stated that if it could be all 
hauled at one time, the train won" I 
quire BOO cars, and won four 

mi'es 

* » * 

ic freedom 
in San Fran. i?co is being traveled. The 



AXH CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



17 




Soups 



Stews and Hashes can be delicately seasoned 
by using 



Lea & Perrins* Sauce 




THE ORIGINAL WORCESTERSHIRE 



It is a rare relish for Fish, Meats, Game, Salads, etc. 



BEWARE OF IMITATIONS. 



John Duncan's Sons, Agents, New York. 



personnel of the new Board of Super- 
visors is a long stride in the right direc- 
tion. It is refreshing to turn from the 
Caseys, the .Finns, the Lonergans, the 
Dinans, the "Hivers-of-Blood" Tveitmoes, 
and all the other motley crowd of boodlers 
lo the Magees, the Brandensteins, the 
Sachs, and the Murdocks of the new 
Board. 



In Berlin, seven thousand policemen 
are looking for a wretch whose mania is 
murdering little girls. Kirchoff gives, in 
his worlc, an amazing description of 
monomaniacs and their delusions. During 
the dark ages, Switzerland was the thea- 
tre of ania. Ivkanthropy or wolf mad- 
ness. One man imagined he was a wolf 
and begap to attack people, tearing them 
to pieces with his teeth. The mania 
spread with frightful rapidity. Whole 
towns were infected, and a traveler has 
loft an account of visiting a village whose 



inhabitants were men and women wan- 
dering about on their hands and knees, 
snarling like wolves and attacking any one 
who walked like a human being. The 
devil possessed in Scripture were mono- 
maniacs. Jack the Ripper was urged on 
by this mysterious and devilish thing to 
his unspeakable deeds. 

Mania often assumes an innocent trend 
and the patient, aside from being a nui- 
sance, is harmless. The disease comes 
from delusion generated by suggestion 
and developed by continuous brooding. 
We know little relatively of the human 
mind. Alienists go just so far when they 
are confronted with the unknown, the 
shady land of doubt, speculation, hope, 
fear and conjecture. That the mind is 
infinite I firmly believe; that man will 
eventually live thousands of years on this 
earth, when he knows how. I as firmly 
believe. As it is, no step in knowledge is 
made without surmounting the obstacle 
of precedent born of conservatism. 



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18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 3, 1907. 




FINANCIAL 




The vigorous protests of State Min- 
After the California eralogist Lewis E. Aubury, of Cali- 
Land Thieves. fornia, at the neglect of the nationa] 

authorities to push the investigation 
of his charges of extensive land frauds in the State, are at last 
about to bear fruit, and the announcement is now made that 
James R. Garfield, the Secretary of the Interior, has instructed 
Commissioner Ballinger, of the Land Department, at present in 
Oregon, to come down here and take the matter up. Mr. Aubury 
makes some very serious charges against land grabbers in this 
State, who have been assisted in their nefarious operations, he 
claims, by the lax methods and crooked work of officials high up 
in the Federal Land Department. More than 10,000,000 acres 
of public lands in California have been stolen by a system of 
fraud, which will, it is said, be a revelation when it is uncloaked 
upon an investigation untrammeled by the interference of power- 
ful friends of the culprits, who will all land in jail it they get 
their just deserts. Much of this land, which has been acquired 
by false statements of fact and by criminal procedure, is min- 
eral in character. Mr. Aubury is in a position, it is claimed, to 
thoroughly expose these fraud's, and he says he is willing to do 
so when he gets the assistance from the Federal Government, 
which it is now about to extend him. Of course, it will be a 
difficult matter to convict the rascals mixed up in this disgraceful 
business. As a rule, they are rich themselves, and represent peo- 
ple who are both rich and powerful politically. Great influence 
will undoubtedly be invoked to save the guilty parties from con- 
viction, and for this reason, every assistance possible should 
be given Mr. Aubury in the prosecution of the case. The law 
officers of the State should be the first to come to his assistance, 
and the only wonder is that they have not already entered the 
field. The interests of the people at large are at stake, and surely 
it is the duty of the Attorney General to take a hand in the prose- 
cution of thieves who have been operating on such a tremendous 
scale that the State is in a fair way to be robbed of millions of 
dollars, and in the interest entirely of people elsewhere who 
have not, it is claimed, even stopped short of bribery to carry 
out their illegal ends. In regard to the extent of these frauds, 
Mr. Aubury is quoted as follows: "There is more fraud in con- 
nection with mining land cases in California than in Oregon, 
Montana, Colorado, Utah and Wyoming combined." 

Forty- two more "dead ones" have 
Clearing the List of been dropped from the list of the 
Wild-cats. San Francisco Stock and Exchange 

Board by orders of the Governing 
Committee. Among them are the following : Red Rock Exten- 
sion, Jim Butler Extension, Tonopah Golden Gate, Broughers 
Jim Butler - Extension, Tonopah Virginia, Sylvania, Kawich 
King, Kawich Gold, Kawich Bullfrog, Tokop Consolidated. 
Kawich Mining Company, Gold Beed Mines, Gold Reed Mines 
Extension, Silver Peak, Brown Hope, Lida Hawk, Kawich Key- 
stone, Red Dog, Free Gold, Golden Terra, Lida Sunset, Lookout, 
Cyrus Noble, El Dorado Nevada, Goldfield Tule Canyon, Pall 
meto Lucky Strike, Searchlight Treasurer, Nevada Tule Gold, 
Interstate, Sierra M. and M. Co., Rocky Hill, Consolidated Mcr- 
cur, Majestic Copper, Wild Goose, Northern Light, Pioneer, 
Dutch, Sultana, Death Valley M. and M. Company, Death Val- 
ley Lone Star, Lynx Creek. At this rate, the list should soon be 
purified and clear of all suspicious investments. 

Speaking of the Manhattan Proper 
Satisfactory Work in mine, reference to which as one of 
New Prospect. the promising new prospects of \\ esl 

Manhattan has been made in these 
columns, the Chronicle publishes the following item on the latest 
report of progress in this mine: "In the face of the crosscut, 
run out at the bottom or 16 foot level of the Manhattan Proper 
shaft, a ledge four feet in width is showing. Its formation is 
blue lime quartz, hard and compact, but carrying very encourag- 
ing gold values. Superintedent A. V. Judson intends to drift 
along the strike of this ledge in the hope of locating a pay shoot." 



Mines Blacklisted 
in London. 



Since the above report was received, the announcement is made 
that this one ledge has widened out to 30 feet, and the character 
of the ore has changed to that of the Thanksgiving mine, which 
is regarded as one of the coming properties of this camp. So alike 
are the two ores, it is said, that experts cannot tell them apart. 
It is said that the management of the Proper now contemplates 
the erection of a hoist of sufficient power to prospect the mine at 
depth. 

The new oil pipe line now being 
A Valuable built by the Southern Pacific at a 

Improvement. cost of $i;,oou,ono, will carry the 

oil from the company's wells in Kern 
County to a point at tide water near Port Costa. A great dis- 
tributing plant in this vicinity will be not only a great conven- 
ience for the company, but much more economical than the pres- 
ent system of hauling the oil in tank cars. The pipe line, which 
will be 250 miles in length, will have twenty-three pumping sta- 
tions en route to expedite the flow of the oil. The ditch for the 
pipe will in itself cost $1,500,000. 

The London Financial News is now 
running daily a column headed 
"Storm Signals," for the month. 
Under this caption stand the names 
of the following companies listed from this side of the Atlantic: 
Murchie Extensions, some Tonopah, Goldfield ami Bullfrog 
stocks, La Joya Mining Co., and the Security Co. (Chelten- 
ham & Denver), and the Cobalt Silver Bird. It i s believed, it is 

said that the latter issue has 1 n abandoned, and the Security 

Company of Denver has, it is also said, been repudiated by 
Lloyd's Bank. 

The mining fraternity will likely 
MINERAL Lands ibj feel disappointed at the decision of 

Cut Out. of the Government, which will stop 

them from rushing the lands of the 
Pyramid Lake Reservation, which is soon to he thrown open to 
settlers. From latest information, it carries no mineral rights 
whatever: in other words, no claims for mineral ean be staked. 
It is simply an opening under the reclamation act. The Indians, 
of whom a census is now being taken, will receive first choice in 
severalty, and the remainder of the irrigable lands not needed 
for allotment are to be disposed of to settlera. Both the Indians 
and settlers are to be granted live acres per man of irrigable 
land, the water to be brought in from the Truckee river under 
the plans now being carried into effect. If the mineral sections 
of the reservation are not any better than those of tie' Wblkei 
Lake Reservation, about which there was so much talk, they will 
be little loss. 



SECURITY SAVINGS BANK 

316 MONTGOMERY STREET 
San Francisco, Cat. 

Authorized Capital $1,000,000.00 

Paid Up Capital 500,000.00 

Surplus and Undivided Profits 305,000.00 

Interest at Jk per cent 

the rate of TP P er annum 

was paid on deposits for six months ending June 29, 1907. 

DIRECTORS: WM. BABCOCK, S. L. ABBOTT, O. D 
BALDWIN, JOSEPH D.GRANT, E. J. McCUTCHEN, L. f] 
MONTEAGLE, R. H. PEASE, WARREN D. CLARK, JAS. L. 
FLOOD, J. A. DONOHOE, JOHN PARROTT, JACOB STERN. 



Zadig 8 Go. 

Stock Brokers 



Tonopah, Goldfield, Bullfrog 
Manhattan, Comstock, Fair- 
view and Wonder Stocks 



324 Bush Street, directly oppoiite the new San Francisco Stock 
and Exchange Building. We have installed a private wire con- 
necting San Francisco with Goldfield. Phona Temporary 1725. 



August 3, 1907. 



AXP CALIFORNIA ADVEHTISER. 



19 



Tin: Market fob 
Mining Shares. 






The local 

market for 
mining shares 
was in better 
shape during the week just closed, and 
Bome good advances are reported, notably 
in the shaves of the Goldfield Consoli- 
dated. These did not all hold like the lat- 
ter, which was in active demand, and 
buyers had to bid up for their stock. The 
general market is inclined to be very sen- 
sitive just now, and the opinion seems 
prevalent among operators that an up- 
ward movement of some magnitude is 
likely to take place here during the fall 
months. A feeling of intense satisfaction 
is noted on the street as the result of the 
action of the miners in regard to the 
question raised over the employment of 
non-union watchmen. The vote at the 
recent meeting practically leaves the agi- 
tators without a leg to stand upon, while 
it secures industrial peace for at least two 
years to come. It is quite evident now 
that the conservatives have now got the 
situation well in hand, which means the 
salvation of the camp. 

The Comstock market has been irregu- 
lar of late, with prices easier in the lead- 
ers. The feature of the week was the suit 
against the Ophir and Con. Virginia 
mining companies by the Golden Gate 
Mining Company, which is simply a new 
version of an old story already told in the 
courts. The Ophir must have done some 
active work if the complaint filed in this 
suit was anything near the truth, in ex- 
tracting ore valued at $2,000,000 
"since June 10, 1907." Such a gross ab- 
surdity is only equaled by the statement 
that every lode has its apex in the ground 
of the plaintiff, and that under Federal 
derisions it all belongs to him. The ad- 
ditional sum of $2,000,000 is asked in the 
Eorra of punative damages. The latest 
official reports from the Comstock show 
that in Savage the upraise in the south- 
east drift on the Sutro Tunnel level is in 
quarts! of low assay value. Progress has 
been impeded in the Ward shaft by water, 
and by the necessity for repairs in Hale 
& Norcross. 



The local market for stinks and bonds 
. onl inuea quiet. 'I be situation in the 
nil does nut f,t\ oi the investment of sur- 
plus Eunds just now. Sugar stocks have 
been a feature of late, and Associated Oil 
scored quite an advance. Bonds continue 
dull and unchanged. 



MISERABLE TACTIG8. 

Testimony given before a Grand Jury 
should be of a privileged character, and 
it should not be divulged to the irrespon- 
sible reporters of the daily press. In a 
case such as that of the first Glass jury. 
the charge has been made that certain 
jurors have been bribed, by money or 
otherwise, to give a decision so favorable 
as to acquit, or at least tie up the ease with 
a mis-trial. Investigation shows that all 
the rumors, emanal ng from the District 
and Jury room, 
and given publicity by newspapers favor- 
able to tli . ion, have absolutely 
no foundation in fact. That is not the 
interesting phase of the situation, so far 




The Possibilities = 
of the Autopiano ~ 

Do you realize fully the wonderful possibilities of the Autopiano? 

As a piano for those who play, it is perfect — satisfying the most exact- 
ing demands of the artist. 

But it is as a Player Piano — a piano that any one can play — that its 
vast possibilities are fully realized. 

It Is a musical education in itself — and more — the means of utilizing 
and developing your musical ideas. "" " , "* 4 " 

It puts within your power the ability to play the works of the great 

artists — Beethoven, Mendelssohn, Liszt, Chopin — to be brief — that of any mi^^m^ 

artist. This for those who love the classics. hhhiks^m 

Others may prefer the popular. For such there are the light operas, mHna 

dance music, marches, ragtime. ^^^^^^ 

And you learn to play — according to your fancies and your own inter- ^^^^^m 

pretation — with but a few minutes Instruction — and with the skill of _^_^^_ 
an artist. 

Now can you, as a lover of music, whether you play or do not play, 
forego for another day the pleasure of owning an Autopiano? 

Put aside your misgivings — incredulity — doubts and hesitancy — and let m^^^^^ 
us prove to you the wonderful things you are missing every day you are ihimb 
without an Autopiano. n^™«m— 

Eilers Music Company — 

1130 VAN NESS AVE. 1220 FILLMORE ST. 

SAN FRANCISCO — 

Oakland Stockton San Jose Eureka Reno, Nev. _ __ 



as Mr. Spreekels and his aides are con- 
cerned, and it is almost certain that these 
miserable tactics have been adopted with 
a view to making it impossible to secure 
a jury except to convict. Supposing that 
the allegations jiven publicity by the 
newspaper friends of Mjr. Spreekels had 
been true, the conduct of the prosecution 



would still be open to criticism. The 
prosecution is in the wrong any way the 
situation is looked at, and the informa- 
tion given by the District Attorney of his 
friends on the Grand Jury is printed 
with a view to prejudicing the minds of 
prospective jurors. This is a criminal 
act. 



20 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 3, 1907. 




Eastern financial circles are again considering the consolida- 
tion of life insurance companies. It is said that the Provident 
Savings, the United States Lite, the Manhattan Life and the 
Washington Life, are the companies involved. The financiers 
who are behind the move are P. Augustus Heinze, the copper 
magnate, and E. R. and 0. Thomas. Rumor has had it before 
that the same influences were trying to combine the Provident 
Savings and the Washington Life. The Washington is con- 
trolled by Mr. Ryan, the man who bought the Hyde stock in 
the Equitable. He was quoted as saying that Mr. Heinze could 
have the control of the Washington if he wanted to pay the price. 
At that time Mr. Heinze evidently did not, for all talk of amal- 
gamation ceased, and the deal was declared off. Now, however, 
the report is given notice again, with the addition of the two 
other companies named. Under the restrictions of the Ann- 
strong law, it is certain that the operations of a capitalist with 
the funds of a life insurance company will not prove as profit- 
able to the manipulator as it did in the old days. Should such 
a move be made by the speculators named, it cannot fail to have 
a bad effect on the business of the companies. The public looks 
askance at any proposition of a life insurance nature which is 

in the least connected with speculations or speculators. 

* * * 

The State Mutual Life Insurance Company of Rome, Georgia, 
has invoked the aid of the United States courts in an effort to 
prevent Commissioner Polk of Tennessee from enforcing the 
laws of that State against it. The suit is in the nature of an in- 
junction to stop the Commissioner from canceling the company's 
Tennessee license. Polk alleges that the company is derelict 
in its duty, and that it does not comply with the laws of the 
State. The ease comes up August 19th at Chattanooga, Tcnn. 

The Pennsylvania Casualty Company has reinsured all its 
steam boiler insurance with the Hartford Steam Boiler Inspec- 
tion and Insurance Company. The transfer carries with it the 
insurance on about two thousand boilers, and insurance amount- 
ing to over twelve million dollars. The company claims the 
reason for reinsuring is, that the business is too expensive, the 
amount of business to be secured being so limited that a sufficient 
volume of premiums cannot be obtained to warrant the expensi . 
» * * 

The Colorado Fire Insurance Company, a mutual affair, is 
re-organizing as a stock company. It will have a capital -;■.., I 
of fifty thousand dollars. This is in compliance with the new 
law of Colorado. 

* * * 

Mr. Bernard Faymonville. first vice-president of the Fire- 
man's Pund, is among the men selected by the Mayor to serve 
on the new Board of Supervisors. Mr. Faymonville, while be? 
ing a more than ordinarily busy man, has agreed to work harder 
at the affairs of the Fireman's Pund in order to help oul the 
affairs of the city with his business ability. 

* * * 

Paul M. Nippert, of the company of the same name, was re- 
cently appointed Colonel on the Governor's staff. His knowledge 
of military tactics, it is said, hardly equals his knowledge of the 
tactics used in the bonding business; in the latter connection he 
ranks as Brigadier-General. 

* * * 

The West Coast Life Insurance Company has moved down 
town, and is now settled in the West Coast Life Building coma 
of Pine and Leidesdorf streets. 

* * * 

The Brokers' Exchange has now nearly four hundred members 
who have signed the roll and deposited' the one hundred dollar 
fee. Those that are in appear to be satisfied with the workings 
of the association so far. Those that are outside are complaining 
that it is a hardship to lose the commission which they hav° 
heretofore made. The new deal eliminates all the small fry and 
all those who make insurance a side show to some other business 
It is claimed that the brokers will give better care to the assured 



under the new methods adopted than was possible when every 
one who could get a risk got the commission. The rate of com- 
mission remains the same, and the membership is open to any 
person who ear. first obtain a license from the Board. 

* • • 

The Metropolitan Life Insurance Company will not withdraw 
from the State of Texas. It will comply with the Robertson 
law, and then it is said will test the constitutionality of the case 

in the courts. 

* * * 

The Pacific .Mutual Life of this State announces that it will 
remain in Texas in spite of the law which has caused the with- 
drawal of nearly all the life companies. 

* » • 

The Southern Express Company lias decided to become its own 
bondsman, h has organized a bonding department, with head- 
quarters in Chattanooga. The business was formerly transacted 
by the Guarantee Company of North America, which now loses 
it. In commencing the bonding department the Southern Ex- 
press Company took over the June and July premiums, which 
amounted to over thirty thousand dollai'-. 

* * * 

The Wisconsin Legislature at its recent Bession passed several 
measures affecting life insurance, li increased by one law the 
taxes of the Northwestern Life Insurance Company from two 
to three per cent. Another bill abolishes all proxies and permits 
the policy-holder to vote by mail or in person. Another provision 
of the new law limits the salary or compensation which the 
Northwestern may pay to any one officer or official to a maximum 
of twenty-five thousand dollars per year. The life companies 
fought this legislation for months, but failed to eliminate sev- 
eral bills which are thought to be too restrictive in their re- 
quirements, and too burdensome on the companies. 

* * * 

The sixteen companies which retired from Texas on account 
of the Robertson law paid into the State Treasury last year the 
sum of one hundred and forty thousand dollars in round figures. 
This includes filing fees. The bulk of this large sum represented 
a tax of two and a quarter per cent on gross premiums. The 
companies which have withdrawn are Columbian National of 
Boston, Des Moines Life, Equitable Lite of New York, Ger- 
niania Life, Home Life. Manhattan Lite, Massachusetts Mutual 
Life, Mutual Benefit Life, Mutual Life of New York. National 
Life of Montpelier, Vt. ; New York Life, Pennsylvania Mutual. 
Prudential, Security Mutual of Binghampton. Travelers and 
Washington Life.. 

* * * 

Exceedingly heavy losses in the State of Washington among 
the saw and shingle mills and other woodworking plants have 

eause'd the casualty companies to double their rates in that State. 

* * * 

Mr. S. H. Wolfe ami his brother, the leading insurance exami- 
ners of the United Status, have left for the blast. They have 
completed the work on the Fireman's Fund and the Pacific 
.Mutual Life. Insurance Commissioner E. Myron Wolf is exam- 
ining, or aboul to examine, all the local companies, 'the Pacific 
Coast Casualty and the Pacific Coast Surety, the West Coasl 
Life, the Occidental Life and the California Fire. It is gener- 
ally understood thai the companies are anxious to have a search- 
ing and thorough examination made both of their investments, 
condition and methods of business. 

* * * 

Mr. P. G. Halle, who is the general manager for the Western 
Department of the Germania, is organizing an association of the 
managers of the non-board companies. 

* * * 

The final report, of the receiver of the Old Wayne Mutual 
Life has been filed. The receiver was appointed al the instance 
of the Attorney General of Indiana in L904. The Old Wayne 
was the most notorious graveyard insurance company that ever 
fleeced a trusting and ignorant public. It had more lives than 



Burns Hamman Baths 

Ladies' Department 

Open Day and Night 

Phone Franklin 2245 817 Eddy St., S. F. 



AmisT 3, 1907. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



21 



the proverbial cat. Time and tim • again il m 

managi d to I eep alive up to the lencemi i ,. above 

action. From the reporl the following Rgu I: The 

total receipts of the receivership were 5(71,977.49, and equaled 
the disbursements. The amounl pairl out by lie receiver at the 
time the first dividend was declared, Man b 6, L903, o 

"' the i ■!• al five per cent, was $18,599.88. The 

amount paid out to the claimants February 35, 1907, when the 
second dh idend was declared, at 8V, per cenl on the order of the 
court, was $30,934.94. Final dividends at l.".i j per cent, and 

amounting to $355.84, were ordered by the courl on cl: - upon 

which there had been paid no previous dividends. The court 
and attorneys' fees of the receivership amounted to $10,- 
936.40, and the trust company, as receiver, received $4,000. 
Some years ago the News Letter in no uncertain manner helped 
to end the underground operations of this concern in California. 

FILIPINOS ARE MODERNIZING. 

The London Commercial Intelligence publishes the follow- 
ing interesting article concerning the modern tendencies in the 
Philippines and the market it creates for occidental manufac- 
tures. It was written by Raymond E. Mason, late editor of the 
Manila Times: 

"Slowly, but surely, as the Japanese have done, the Filipinos 
are adopting European dress. For one thing, they are — even the 
lowest class— .beginning to wear hats and shoes on Sundays, and 
there are thousands who follow the practice all the week. As yet 
the native neck lias not become accustomed to the stiff collar and 
the Filipino dandy on the Escolta or the Luneta contents himself 
with a shirt of the tennis order, but insists always on a bowler 
hat. The Filipino ladies of the upper class have always dressed 
well, but to the native pina cloth they are now adding nearly 
every textile that London itself knows, and a very well-known 
Manchester firm which was established in Manila before the 
war does more business in its drapery department than it for- 
merly did in all branches. It should be said, however, that this 
change in fashion applies as yet only to the large cities, and that 
the country is only partiallv affei led. but orders from the other 
provinces and from the Bouthem islands this year not infre- 
quently include reasonably up-to-date bridal costumes, and with 
the latter a sewing machine is invariably requisitioned. Now- 
adays, inn. the bride takes a toothbrush with her on her honey- 
moon, but if will lake at least a generation to induce even a 
minority id' the population to give up the chewing of betal root. 

"Eating New Foods and Handling New Tools. 

"The manufacture of beer in Manila is a monopoly enjoyed 
by a Spanish company— one of the fc« which remain — and it 
has eleven years more to run. but Australia's wine bill is grow- 
ing by leaps and bounds, and ii may be mentioned in passing, too, 
that our great commonwealth's resources have changed alto- 
gether the Filipino diet. Formerly the native ale rice and mum- 
mified fish for evi ping his poultry to light with — 
but now. thanks to the nearness oi Sydney, bis menu may include 
beef, mutton, rabbit and i ts. Fruit he has 
always bad. and always will have, in plenty. The Filipino has 
never bandied any other tool than a bolo, with which he builds 
houses nicts irrigation plants of a sort on his paddy 
* * * This great mass of people, so suddenly lifted out of 
obsi nriiv, are shortly to become a factor in the world's indi 

life.- 



Situated within easy reach of Califor- 
nia, Sk Springs has always had a heavj . . This 
famous resort is only four and one-half hours from San Fran- 
and there is but nine mil a road that 

lauty. The 
\ny one 
ig information 

f. F. Mulgrew, propi S iggs >mia. 



If r hereabouts would quit making news 

and print ai 



ihinp Syrup for children's teething Is guaranteed 
under the Poo 1 No. ]n'.>S. 



Fireman's Fund 



INSURANCE COMPANY OF 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Gapital $1,600,000 Assets, $5,772,374.28 

Sansome and California Sts., S. F. 

Connecticut Fire Insurance Go. 

Of Hartford. Established 1850. 

Ca P ltal Jl.000,000.00 

Total Assetts $5,721,433.00 

Surplus to Policy Holders 2,282,186.00 

December 31. 1906. 
518 California St., San Francisco, Gal. 

Benjamin J. Smith, Manager 

Cash Capital, $200,000. Cash Assets, $546,555.61 

Pacific Coast Gasualty Co. 

of California. 

Employers' Liability, General Liability, Teams, Elevators, Workmen's 
Collective, Vessels. Burglary, Plate Glass Insurance. 

Officers— Edmund P. Green, President; John C. Coleman, Vice-Presi- 
dent; P. A. Zane, Secretary; Ant. Borel & Co., Treasurers; P. P. Deering 
Counsel. 

Directors— A. Borel, H. E. Bothin, Edward L. Brayton, John C. Cole- 
man, P. P. Deering. E. P. Green. I. W. Hellman, Jr., George A. Pope 
Henry Rosenfeld, Adolph A. Son. William S. Tevls. 

Head Office — Monadnock Building, San Francisco. Marshal A. Frank 
Company, General Agents for California, Kohl Building, San Francisco. 

Founded A. D. 1792. 

Insurance Go. of North America 

Philadelphia, Penn. 

Paid-up Capital $3,000,00t 

Surplus to Policyholders 4,042 994 41 

San Francisco Con Hag rat ion Losses paid "s'260000 3 

BAILEY & JOHNSTON. General Agents, ' "^ 

N.E. Corner Pine and Battery streets, San Francisco 

British and Foreign Marine Insurance Co., Ltd 

Of Liverpool. 

Capital $6,700,000 

BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO., Agents. 

il6 Jackson Street. . San Francisco. 



Continental Building and Loan Association 

Market and Church Streets, San Francisco, Gal. 

In Business for 1 8 Years 



CAPITAL SUBSCRIBED 
CAPITAL PAID IN AND RESERVE 



$15,000,000.00 
- 2,481,317.50 

4 per cent, paid on ordinary deposits 6 per cenl paid on term deposits. Interest paid on de- 
posits since organization over $2,500,000.00. Call or write at any time. Always glad to 
answer questions. 

Washington Dodge, President Joseph 0. Crawford. M D , 2nd Vice President 

James McCulIogh. 1st Tice President Gavin McNnb Attorney 

William Corbin. Sec'y and Ueo'l Manager 



r 



PACIFIC TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY 



Capital $500,000 



F. G. Drum, President 



Murry F. Vandall, Manager 



TITLES EXAMINED AND INSURED 



420 Montgomery Street 



San Francisco 



California 



All kinds of Interior repair work and furniture made to order a 

usual. t'NITEP CRAFTS AND ARTS. 147 Presidio avenue. 



ANNUAL MEETING 

The Risdon Iron and Locomotive Works 

rboanno stockholders of the Ris.lnn Inn and I. 

[ Hi-- ensuing jrar mid id n«M as may be 

iiai the..Hifv.>f l! 
day of August. ]W>7, at it o'clock a, b, 

AUGUSTUS TIYIOR, Secretory 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 3, 1907. 




VOIOBILE 



J^L 



The automobile owners are up and doing. The latest scheme 
to be taken up is that of giving the old people of the city an out- 
ing in the modern vehicles. The News Letter in a late issue 
suggested that while the owners were enthusing over the outing 
tortile orphans it would be well to think of those who are pass- 
ing the remaining days in quietness, and whose chances to enjoy 
the automobile grow less every day. 

The officers of the California Woman's Automobile Club are 
the ones who are going to give the old people the pleasure of rid- 
ing in a motor car. The event will take place on Saturday, 
August 17th. The run will be through the Presidio, thence 
through the park to the beach, where there will be a concert and 
a light luncheon will be passed around the automobiles. Then 
the guests of the club will be taken down the great highway and 
back again to the south drive of the park, and then home.^ It 
will be a ride of a little over two hours. A hundred machines 
will be needed for the occasion, and the women enthusiasts will 
have to depend on the owners to help them out. They should 
have no trouble to get the number of cars needed. It is not 
like lilling up the cars with children, who are liable to scratch 
the cars. But every one who loans their cars will have the 
pleasure of seeing some gray-haired couple enjoying a ride 
that must bring back to those in the cars memories of the ambi- 
tions of youth." The smiling faces of the "venerables" will im- 
press everlasting pictures on the mind. Pictures that can never 
be forgotten. 

The woman's club is commencing to do a lot of good work. 
Let every one help them along. When a woman starts out to do 
a lot of good things for automobiling, just get in and boost. 
Nothing helps a woman so much as to let her know that she is 

appreciated. 

* * * 

By the time this issue of the News Letter is in the hands of 
the subscribers, the endurance run of the Dealers' Association 
and the hill climb up the Witter boulevard will be a matter of 
history. The impression at the early part of the week was that 
there would be the largest entry ever received for an event of the 

Association. 

* * * 

On Sunday, August 11th, there are to be automobile races on 

the track at Concord. From the number of events planned, 

there should be a great day's sport at the track. The entries 

will close on the 6th with the secretary at Concord. 
» * * 

R. P. Schwerin, chairman of the committee that is building 
the boulevard out of the city to join the country road at the 
fourteen-mile house, made a report last week. This report shows 
that the work is progressing most favorably, and if there is no 
hitch in the proceedings, the boulevard should be finished within 
ninety days. Schwerin showed a lot of photographs which he 
had taken along the road. They were views of the work already 
accomplished. What is mostly needed at the present time is 
about fifteen thousand dollars more to complete the boulevard! 
Not only is work being done on the San Mateo end, but the ciiv 
end that runs from the great highway south to a point on the 
county line is also being completed. All the grading has been 
finished, and now they are putting in the rock. About seven- 
teen hundred feet of this has already been laid. The completion 
will be the greatest boom to the automobile that has ever taken 
place in the city. 

* ♦ * 

The most important event in automobile circles at the present 
time is the attempt of the local enthusiasts to bring the A'an- 
derbilt Cup race to the coast. Max Rosenfeld and N. R. Cooper, 
with the co-operation of A. B. Watson, chairman of the rans and 
tours committee of the Automobile Club of California, are now 
working with the officers of the American Automobile Associa- 
tion. A telegram was sent the first of the week to A. R. I'ar- 
dington, chairman of the racing board of the A. A. A., asking to 
have the Vanderbilt race transferred to the coast. If the scheme 
was not. agreeable, the local automobilists suggested that the 



POUR CYLINDERS--20 HORSE POWER 



M 
O 
D 
£ 
L 




M 

O 
D 
£ 
L 



THE CAR THAT HAS PROVED ITSELF 



to the manner born with the greatest 
medium-powered cars of America and 
Europe regardless of price — the 




No new car ever put on the 
market, even with the advantage of a 
great name behind it, has taken sucli a prompt 
and firm hold on experienced, critical motorists. Every day 
increases its lead. The new Model G stands alone -'^ ;i 
value impossible to produce anywhere except in the largest, 
best-equipped automobile factory in the world— classing with 
automobiles of twice the price. 

Has the toughness, staying power, sensitive control, mar- 
velous! y smooth running qualities of all Cadillacs. 

Shaft drive; newly designed selective type sliding gear 
transmission; high speed with no gears in mesh: spirited in 
design as well as action; abundant hill climbing power. 
Demonstrated by nearest dealer. 

Catalogues of this and other models as follows: 
Model G — 20 h. p. 4-cyllnder Touring Car (Catalog GAE.) 
Model M — 10 h. p. Four Passenger Car (Catalog MAE.) 
Model H — 30 h. p. 4-cyllnder Touring Car (Catalog HAE.) 
Model K— 10 h. p. Runabout (Catalog MAE.) 

Send for catalogue of car tn which you are interested. 

CADILLAC MOTOR CAR COMPANY, Detroit., Mich. 

Member Association Licensed Automobile Mfgrs. 

For sale by Cuyler Lee. 359 Golden Gate avenue, San 

Francisco, and Lee Motor Car Co.. 1032 South Main St., Los 

Angeles. 



racing cars be sent out, and that a $5,000 gold trophy, to be 
known as the California Cup, would be hung up. Word was 
also sent to J. W. Leavitt, President of the Automobile Dealers' 
Association of California, who is at the present time in the Bast, 
asking him to go to New York and work for the scheme. Rosen- 
feld has laid out a course in Oakland that will take in Hie boule- 
vard, and which will be fifty miles to the lap. 

To help the scheme along. Governor Gillett has stated Hint be 
lias no objections to the militia patrolling the course. 1ml that lie 
could not order them out for the occasion. They would have i" 
volunteer their services. 

* * * 

When it is desired to accelerate the speed quickly, it is ad- 
visable to retard the spark somewhat, as a sudden opening of 
the throttle with an advanced spark produces knocking until 

the motor reaches a point synchronous with the spark. 

* * * 

G. N. Easton is just back from a five days' tour in his seven- 
passenger \\ hite Pullman, through Santa Cruz anil Monlcrev 
lle has only learned to run Ihe auto two months ago, ye1 tool< 
it on this long and hard trip, and had no trouble whatever, lie 
went over San Juan grade at night on the high gear: in fad. 
on the first day's run went from here I" Salinas on the high. 
Leaving Felton, be got on the wrong roads, ami had to travel 
through two miles of deep sand and over terribly rough roads 
Tn the party were Mr. ami Mrs. Baston, their two children, and 
Mr. and Mrs. George N. Root, Mr. Easton goes this Sunday 
with his White up to Sacramento, and will tour extensively. 

* * * 

Charles McDonald, prominent Oakland motorist, is getting 
ready for a trip up the coast to Seattle in his White steamer. 



MOLINE ROADSTERS 

At the Crescent Garage, corner of c7WcAllister » nd Gough 
streets one may buy a Moline Rjoadster, 4-cylinder, 20 horse- 
power for $1950 f. o. b. Immediate delivery. 



■ st 3, 1907. 



AND CALIFOKN1A ADVERTISER. 



83 



Charles B. Shanks, general sales manager of the V. 
Motor Carriage ' ompany, has his line oul for salmon troui in 
Lady Evelyn Lake, Northern Canada. Nexl year h 

California. 

* * * 

The Winton Company is sending Clarence B. Lincoln from 
the home office to its Seattle branch house, where he will assisi 
Manager Miller. 

* * » 

E. C. Henn, of Cleveland, inventor of the National Acme 
multiple spindle screw machine, has purchased his third Winton 
car, a model M. 

* * * 

Clarence J. Berry, of Fresno, generally known as the Klon- 
dike King, will start out next month for a Ion"- tour in his 
new White steamer, which arrived from the Easl yesterday. 
Berry has been an autoist for a number of years. In 1901 he 
owned a White Stanhope. 

E. B. Waterman, of Waterman Bros. Co., Fresno, was in town 
recently, and says they have had a fine season in his part of the 
State. "We sold all the Whites we could get a hold of," he 
said. "Our sales of machines for this past twelve months is 
almost double those of the year before." 

* * * 

One of tho wonders of the Glidden lour was little Al. Kuinpf, 
the kid who drives Pierce car No. 27. Kumpf was an office boy 
for the George N. Pierce Co., of Buffalo, four years ago, and 
was then but thirteen years of age. He is now but seventeen, 
and handles his big forty-five horse-power car as though born 
to the work. Kumpf came into fame after having acted as a 
mechanic for Percy Pierce, who twice won the trophy, and other 

good drivers. 

* * * 

Women are learning that the "automobile complexion" is 
better than any brand to he hail in the drug stores. 







*fr- 




> 




rBBi 








^BUSto* 


















LEGITIMATELY HIGH PRICED 






DEMONSTRATION BY APPOINTMENT 






LOZ1ER AUTO AGENCY, 






132 Valencia St,. San Francisco 


-J 




Thomas B. Jerfery 8 Company, 117-125 Valencia St., San Francisco 

Although Fort Smith, Ark., has but 22 automobilists and no 
improved streets worth boasting of, the city dads realize that the 
owners of the cars are "good things." Accordingly, they have 
passed an ordinance imposing a tax of $10 per year on single 
seat cars and $13 on two seaters. The 22 owners are so mad 
that an "indignation meeting" is in prospect. 



JJ &h^ 1907 



"TThe&esljlutomobile" 




Price W50O FOB Cleveland. 5 P.»en«et 

The Steam, flexibility ot tnolot i. the greatest of any eat. Bedde. being a meal powerful cat. the Steam, ii one ol the meat 
durable machine! built. 

STEARNS cat. are deagncd by engineer., built by mechanic, tejted by ejpera and eon.eq.uenlly operated w.ln satisfaction 
by iboir u.en We invite your caiehil mve.ni.tion and compnri.00. confident that we will prod ihereby. 

THBSB ARE FACTS THAT WE WANT TO DEMONSTRATE TO TOO 

Ph.ne Franklin 3008 

California-Nevada Automobile Company, 368 Golden Gate Avenue 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Even as regards violating the speed 
limit, a chief of police of a seashore towD 
in France proved the truth of the tradi- 
tional French politeness last summer, ac- 
cording to the story told by a German 
motorist. He admits that on some occa- 
sions he drove slightly in excess of the 
speed limit when passing through the 
town, and always drove his own car. One 
morning when he went to the garage to 
take his car out, he found on the driver's 
seat a most friendly letter from the Chief 
of Police requesting in the most polite 
manner that the driver be sure not to ex- 
ceed the speed limit in the town, failing 
which the police, to their regret, would br 
obliged to arrest him. It may be men- 
tioned in passing that there have been nn 
recorded instances of either Frenchmen 
or natives of any other country receiving 
such courteous warning when in Germ 

* * * 

Down in Alabama, where the 
of motorphobia are quite prom 

-■ has entered the legislature. Re- 
cently a bill was introduced in the Souse 
prohibiting the use of auto on the 

public highways of the State. 

* * * 

By trading marbles for kni\ 
for a nam zosts for a pony, the 

pony for 8 

motor, little Willie Westingho 
Myers, of Berwick, Pa., is credited with 
having succeeded in E le main es- 

il for an automobile on which he has 
for a long time been at work. Th 
chine is now on the streets, and its speedy 
rings are civir.g all other traffic the 
shivers. 



24 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Aucust 3, 1907. 



That the 20th century smuggler is no 
whit less resourceful and daring than his 
predecessors has been proved in two re- 
cent cases in which a motor ear played a 
leading part. 

The scene of one adventure was the 
French frontier, where the customs offi- 
cer at Wkmeton, seeing a motor car rac- 
ing toward him in a cloud of dust from 
Belgium, rushed out to stop it. His only 
reward was a brick hurled at him by one 
of the motorists as the car crashed by. 

A couple of hundred yards ahead two 
gendarmes, seeing what had happened, 
drew a wooden bench across the road, but 
the car, in its headlong flight, reduced the 
bench to matchwood, while the gendarmes 
fired their revolvers in vain at the two 
motorists as they flashed past. 

At Deulmont, a few miles farther on, 
the customs officers placed a horse trough 
in the middle of the road, and this ob- 
stacle, although it suffered severely in the 
collision, had the effect of smashing in 
the front of the oar. which, with the gen- 
darmes in full pursuit, began to slow 
down. 

its occupants, seeing that the "game 
was up." jumped out and took to their 
heels across the country, leaving behind 
in the tonneau of the disabled car 1600 
pounds of excellent tobacco. 

* * * 

In spite of previous talk to the contrary 
it now seems probable there will be a 
slight further lengthening of the wheel 
base in 1908 touring cars. Some inter- 
esting changes in engine detail are prom- 
ised also. The runabout situation seems 
to have settled into a two-cylinder stand- 
ard of the Maxwell type, for light cars of 
medium price and all around service abil- 
ity, with the four sylinder, semi-racer 
type forming a class by itself, in which 
further variety of pattern is to be ex- 
pected. It is still an open question 
whether the semi-racer is not a fad, while 
the two-cylinder disc motor gives all the 
evidences of permanency. 

* * * 

Word comes from Germany that $40,- 
O00 will lie the total loss incurred by the 
[mperial Automobile Club on the Em- 
peror's cup race held recently on the 
Tanus course. The organization, the 
most elaborate of any contest of :i like na- 
ture, called lor I he expenditure of $100,- 
000. to meet which the organizers have 
only the entry Pees and the guarantee 
fund of $20,000 raised by (he national 
cluli. Largely owing to the bad weather, 
very little was obtained from the rent of 
giand stands. 

Whatever may be the cost of repairing 

small surface tears or cuts in the tread of 
an outer tire casing, it is well repaid h\ 
the added life gained by tin- tire in th.u 
way. A jagged surface soon wears and 
rips away from the canvas base, and a tire 
which is neglected is as good as ruined. 




MACKAY CURE 
for ALCOHOLISM 



Surest, safest and shortest treatment. Taken at home, 
no publicity; no detention from business ; no hypodermic 
syringe; no morphine. Government Contracts just re- 
newed for the fourth time. The only Treatment ever 
adopted by any Government. Strongly recommended by 
His Grace, the Archbishop of Quebec, and scores of scien- 
tific and philanthropic authorities. Sanitarium for special 
cases. Correspondence strictly conlldennal 

and in plain sealed envelopes. 



THE M»CKAY TREATMENT CO. 

Write Department 7 , 61 Maiden Lane, New York. 



BUICK 



2 CYLINDER CARS 

made a sensational showing at the Santa Rosa races, winning 
six out if eight events. All against cars gf double the price and 
power gf the Buick. 

Cars in stock for immediate delivery". 

4-Cylinder Touring Cars $2050.00 

2- " " " 1400.00 

2- " Runabouts 1250.00 

HOWARD AUTO CO., 

PHONE FRANKLIN 2034 404-406 GOLDEN GATE AVE 



IRVIN SILVERBERG 



CHAS. S. MITCHELL 



THE IRVIN MACHINE WORKS 

Best Automobile Repair Shop West of Chicago 
General Machine Work and Gear Cutting 

Our automobile repair department is equipped with the finest up-to-date 
machinery. The unusual size and consequent steady work enables us to 
employ specialists Instead of expecting our mechanics to be jack-of-all 
trades. Moreover, we can turnish in advance to owners exact estimates 
on cost of any repairs they may contemplate. 

Phone Market 2366. 335-337 Golden Gate Ave. San Francisco 



M&iUa Runabout 


4 CYLINDER 


16-18 HORSEPOWER 


90-INCH WHEELBASE 


30x3 1-2 INCH TIRES. 


PRICE $1150 


OSEN & HUNTER AUTO COMPANY 


407 Golden Gate Avenue. Phone Market 2723. 




USE MAYERLE'S EYEWATER. 

beforo exposing your eyci to strong wind, dust, light or lun. It is a perfectly haimles* and oftVe- 
tlve proportion. Ouiirmitced under the U. S. Drugs Act. June 301 h. '09, Serial Ho i 1) 

Cbaa. Crow, care of W. w, Montague ft Co.. Pipe Shop, bo?;.: ' i b i ■■■ ■ i ■ ublad with tnj ay*! 

for a number of years. I tried a bottle of your Eyewater and find it is the bill Ry« I . 

used, and would not be without it in the house. " Highly rc'-oiuiuiM) <K>1 fur weak eyci, poor 
night. Boroeyeb, cloudiness of vision, floating spots, pain annul the eye*, behind tbi I 
temples watery or dlichargfng eyoa, feeling like sand in the eyea. burning, smarting, Itching 
scratching, twitching gluuy eyes. hoavy eyelids and other eye troubles. Parent] ■ bating tholr ion- 
sitivo eyes QXPOied to the strong tight, dust, wind r,r IUU can got instant relief by using Mi.v.tIp'h 

eyewater BKWARE OF INJURIOUS IMITATIONS Take no inhititnU. P 1O1 bj mall Me 

ior oho down bottles, $6 00. Mayerls'i ftnttieptlc Eyeglass w (peri, !<■ be mod when i Fi 
liroor strain the eyos. 2 'or 2.'.c. No glasses leave George Hayerla' a Optical loatltal ileai ab- 
solutely correct Address all eotnmanlcatlnni to George Hnyerle, 1149 Golden Gate Arouni Ban 
Francisco, near Webstar. Plume West .'iTiid fill t !■ in out 



<t 3, 1907. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



25 



Barney Oldfield's Recenl Performan 

Barney Oldfield hired a new press agenl a tew weeks ago, and 

that he has made e I, jood, is disclosed bj n 

Portland; Oregon. ii cording to stories Erom the Mo 
city, Oldfield was arrested in Portland on July Ith. the charge, 
ns stated, being the running of a Eake automobile race in that 
eity, and using the name of a local automobile club for the pur- 
pose of gaining prestige. Oldfield was released on $500 bail, 
it was stated. A warrant was also issued for the arresl <>( E. A. 
Sfoross, his manager, so said the telegraphic reports, but Moross 
had taken the train I'm- Butte, Mont. The next day's news had 
it that Oldfield. while brooding over his arrest, attempted to 
commit suicide, but was restrained by Mrs. Oldfield. The most 
recent advices from Portland credit Oldfield with saying that 
his attempted suicide was a mistake; that he was intoxicated 
and had mere])* broken a window glass. All of which, or part 
of which, may or may not he true. 

* * * 

Forced into a I/achy Gamble. 

It was not generous tips that enabled C. P. Doherty, a Chicago 
waiter, to have an automobile. Now that he has the machine lie 
does not dare try running it because to till it with gasoline and 
lubricating oil alone would almost take his week's salary, and 
besides, he does not wish to lessen its selling value. Doherty's 
boss insisted on his taking a dollar ticket in spite of his protes- 
tations that he could not use an automobile if he got one, and 
could not afford to give up a dollar to try for a machine. Never- 
theless, his superior had a certain number of tickets to dispose 
of anil made him take one, deducting the dollar from the week's 
paj envelope. The car, valued al $g,i>ij(l, was awarded to him. — 
The Miilor World. 

A model "II" White steamer won the regularity run con- 
ducted by the Quaker City Motor Club, on duly 3d. The White 

was the only car, of the 15 which competed, to make a perfect 
score. 

Ill the race meet at Santa Rosa, Cal., on duly 4th, a model 

"(i" White steamer, with full \ equipped touring body, won the 
ten mile race for cars of 35 horse power and under in 12.54 ; won 
the 25 mile free-for-all iu '.Ml. 07, and was the first car starling 
from scratch to finish in the 10 mile handicap. The best mile 

was made in L.02. 
A perfect score was made by the model "Q" White steamer in 

the 185 mill' endurance run from [jOS Angeles to Lakosid I 

July Sd. The car earned se\cii passengers, with baggage, and 

made the mountainous trip on a fuel consumption of in gallons. 



,1 STATEMENT. 
That the public may know, we desire to say. in regard to the 

resignation of Mr. George thai it was of his own volition, and 
againsl our wishes, and we greatlj regrel his action. Thai he 
has made a long and courageous fight for "open shop" in this 

coi 1 1 1 1 i t \ againsl odds thai would discourage most men, goes 

without saying, lie plans for a trip abroad, and our good 
wishes go with him with the hope ho may see tit to take up his 
work later on. — Citizens' Alliance. 



The Citizens' Ulia u e o San Francisco desires to inform 

n- members .and ihe law-abiding public thai they have removed 
to their new quarters in the Merchants' Exchange Building, 
rooms Nos. 917-18-20 and 23, and thei cordially invite those 
who are members, or who are unlawfully imposed upon, to call. 







RAINIER 






35 h. 


p. Make and Bre.lk with Simms-Bosch Magn 

The Pullman of Motor Cars 


eto. 


428 


Golden 


Guaranteed free of repairs for one year. 

HAYES & DAM, 
Gate Avenue. Sa" 


Francisco 



Old Poodle Dos: Restaurant 



824*826 Eddy St., near Van Ness Ave. 
cor. Grant Avenue. Phone Franklin $3. 



Formerly at Bush St., 



• 907 PREMIER 



The Quality 
Car 

Touring Gar anil Touring 

Runabout, S2400. 24-28 II. 

P, 4-cyllnder water cooled 

selective type, iliding (tear 

trail i mis lion. 

E. P. SLOSSON, Agent 
Northern California 

GOLDEN CATE GARAGE 
Fell and Ashbury Streets San Francisco Phone We,i 6885 




GEO. P. MOORE CO., Inc. 

AUTOMOBILE SPECIALTIES 

Headquarters for Imported Novelties, Domestic Necessities and 
Local Courtesy combined with Pair Dealing. 



Branch — 1005 South Main St., Los Angeles. 
Branch— 231-233 Twelfth St., Oakland. 



721 Golden Gate Avenue, San Francisco 



SECOND HAND 

Automobiles 

BOUGHT, SOLD, EXCHANGED. Latest stool Id the West R. H. 
MORRIS. Auto Broker, 1818-20 Telegraph Aye., Oakland, Gal. Established 
1901. 



VULCANIZING 



Stevens &. Elkington Rubber Co. 

San Francisco, Cal. 



Phone Franklin 612 

524 Polk St. near Golden Gate Ave. 



Electric Lamps, Bells, and Telephones 



SUPPLIES 
MOTORS 



DYNAMOS 
REPAIRS 



CENTURY ELECTRIC CONSTRUCTION CO. 
18 Fell St., near Market. San Francisco 





KEENAN 


BROS. 






Automobile Engineers, Machl 


lists and Blacksmiths. 




273 


Valencia street, San Francisco. 


Telephone Market 


1985. 



TIPS TO AUTOMOBILISTS 

14-MILE HOUSE — "LTncle Tom's Cabin" Automobile Supplies and re- 
pair shop. First-class accommodations. Cuisine unsurpassed on the 
Coast. "Andy," formerly of the "Cliff House." 

PALO ALTO — Corbaley & Thorpe Auto Co.. Renting, repairing and 
sundries. Fire-proof garage. Day and night service, 443-9 Emerson St 
Telephone Main 78. 

SAX JOSE — Reo & Stoddard -Dayton owners stop at Harrison P. 
Smith's garage. First and San Carlos streets. Motor car supplies and 
repairs. 



SAN JOSE— Lamolle Grill, 
...inner in California 75c, or 
i attention. 



36-38 North First street. The best French 
a la carte. Automobile parties given par- 



GILROY. CAL. — Geo. E. Tice, general machinist, expert repairing of 
automobiles and engines a specialty. Day or night service. 260 N Mon- 
terey street. 

SALINAS. CAL. — Hotel Bardin. Rates %2 per day and up. French chef. 
Best accommodations. Roads excellent. G. Laplerre, Prop. 



26 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LBTTEE 



August 3, 1907. 



Wljat Haa It? 



What it was, neither myself nor the scores who were con- 
scious of its presence, who felt it with their fingers, but could not 
see it, ever knew, or ever will know, until our souls have passed 
over that narrow boundary which separates our musty, decaying 
vestures from the future life beyond the tomb. 

I am only too well aware that but few would believe the re- 
markable story I am about to relate. I draw comfort, however, 
from a conviction that should it ever be made public a select 
few whose mind? have been employed in the investigation of the 
psychic problems will acknowledge that occasionally circum- 
stances of an absolutely inexplicable nature have occurred under 
their own personal observation. 

There are, unfortunately, too many whose utter ignorance, 
unquestioning bigotry or supreme self-conceit precludes their 
belief of scientific facts which are above the scope of their com- 
prehension. An untold number of intelligent beings, having 
never taken the trouble to investigate the theory of evolution, 
laugh its deductions to scorn. Millions who never studied as- 
tronomy deride the fact that light travels at the rate of about 
182,000 miles per second, and that the bright star Canopus is 
several hundred thousand times larger than our sun. My story, 
therefore, will not appeal to any one of those who are born, who 
live and who die no wiser on many subjects than when their 
eyes first opened to the light of day. 

" Some years ago (the exact date is of no particular import- 
ance), I was compelled to undertake a journey from San An- 
tonio to Eagle Pass, which pueblo is, as you know, situated on 
the American side of the Bio Grande. About 9 o'clock the 
morning of my last day's journey, as I was passing a little 
island of trees, I heard the loud bellowing of a bull on the other 
side of the copse. The angry bellow of the animal convinced 
me that something more than a mere tussel with a rival was 
going on, so I galloped around the islet and came upon a huge 
infuriated bull which was goring a prostrate horse. I quickly 
noticed that the rider was caught under the animal, so I 
motioned to one of my followers, who speedily lassooed the 
raging bull and flung him on his side. The man dismounted, 
loosened his rope and then gave the bull several terrific blows 
between the horns with the back of his maehette. The thor- 
oughly subdued monster slowly arose and tottered off. The 
horseman was promptly rescued from his dangerous situation. 
Although he had miraculously escaped being gored by the hull, 
he had experienced such a severe shock that he could not walk. 
Having informed us that his ranch was situated a few miles 
ahead on the main trail to the pueblo, I ordered one of my men 
to give the stranger his horse and mount behind a comrade. The 
rescued one was a tall and very thin man. lie had evidently 
once possessed stalwart proportions, but he had become bent 
and his shoulders seemed almost to meet over hi? sunken breast. 
His high forehead, his clear, blight, penetrating gaze, and hi? 
cultivated language convinced me that T had encountered a 
more than ordinary personage. As we rode forward lie briefly 
informed me how he happened to so nearly fall a victim to the 
bull, and wound up by insisting that myself and my ten follow- 
ers should stop at his ranch that night. 

We soon reached his abode. It was a huge adobe building, 
surrounded by stables and out-houses. The whole cluster was 
enclosed within a high, thick adobe wall, whose summit was 
plentifully garnished with sharp pieces el' black flints fastened 
in a bed of mortar. We rode through the main gate up to (he 
"saguan" (main door) of the building, where we were met by 
a middle-aged, pale-faced, handsome woman, who, a? she noticed 
that her husband was riding a strange horse, exclaimed in 
Spanish: 

"Roberto, que la sueedido?" ("Robert, what has happened?") 

"Nada, vida mia. nada ma, que un pequeno accidente." 
("Nothing, my wife, nothing more than an insignificant acci- 
dent.") 

He was assisted Erom his horse into the wide sala — parlor — 
and placed on a chair. He was evidently suffering most intensely, 



but in a faint tone managed to introduce the lady as his wife, 
la Senora Concha Sanchez de Gray, adding that his own name 
was Robert Gray. He soon, however, could endure a sitting 
posture nn longer, and begged me to assist him to his bed, which 
was in tin' nexl mom. 1 did so, but as he approached the couch, 
he cried: "My God, must I lie downy Must mental anguish 
be added to the physical agony I am now suffering?" and he 
clung, shuddering, to the tall bedpost. 

"Leave me with him," interrupted the pale woman, softly. "I 
will attend to him." 

As I left the apartment, a male servant entered, who un- 
dressed the sufferer and laid him groaning on the bed. In a few 
moments the senora reappeared, and n tying, "Roberto is 

suffering intensely," left the parlor. 

Hardly had she disappeared, when 1 heard the sick man call- 
ing me. 1 entered the room and found him stretched on the 
bed, with a light sheet over him. I noticed, however, that the 
sheet, where it covered the chest, bulged up, as though something 
was beneath it. 

"Lay your hand on my chest," said Don Roberto. 

I did so. 

"Do you feel anything?" he asked, with a ghastly smile. 

"I do," I answered. 

■'What does the object appear to feel like?" 

"It seems as though it were a round ball," I returned, feeling 
the object carefully with the tips of my fingers. 

"Now, pull the sheet from oil' my breast and tell me what the 
'thing' you felt is?" 

I removed the sheet, but started back with surprise and con- 
Bternation, for there was absolutely nothiiiL on his chest. 

"Now place your hand where you thought the thing was, and 
tell me if you can feel it?" he said hoarsely. 

Trembling with apprehension, I advanced and again placed 
my hand where the 'thing' had been, when God in Heaven I I 
felt it again; hard, smooth and oscillating on his palpitating 
breast. I shrank from the bedside, threw myself in a chair and 
covered my face with my almost palsied hands. Again nil again 
I muttered, "What is that accursed thing? 1 can feel it, but 
it is invisible. What, what in God's name, can it be?" How 
long I sat in that position 1 cannot remember, but f wie 
tually aroused by the entrance of the lady, who carried a glass 
with a foaming liquid in it. 

"Drink this, Roberto," she said gently. "It trill sooth your 
shattered nerves and conduce to rest, if not to sleep." 

He emptied the glass, then turning to me observed: "Mr. 
Langley" (for I had told him my name), "you must be hungry. 



DOCTORS 



who Ij»vb littd ftxperi 



ii 



u 



Slycozone 

Endorse and successfully use it in the treatment of 
DYSPEPSIA 

and other stomach diseases. GLYCOZONE is absolutely harmless. 
It cleanses the lining membrane of the stomach, and subdues in- 
flammation, thus helping nature to accomplish a cure, which ac- 
counts for the gratifying results that are obtained. To con- 
vince Dyspeptics that GLYCOZONE cannot fail to help them, I 
will send to any one mentioning this magazine and enclosing 25c. 
to pay forwarding charges 

A $1.00 Bottle Free 
(Only one bottle to a family.) 




Jl^OWCKa^cb 



Sold by leading 

druggists. 
None genuine 
without 
my signature. 



64 F Prince Street, New York 

FREE! Valuable booklet on How to Treat Diseases. 



August 3, 1907. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



27 



if not tired. I hope this position will bring sleep with it, but 
1 must, before I can permit yon to leave me, implore you to 
accept my hospitality for tbia day at least, thai 
courteously, "if your business will not suffer by the delay." 

I hesitated for a moment before 1 consented, but the pleading 
expression on the lady's face decided me. 

"If my men ean also be accommodated I will willingl, i 
main a day or two with you." 

"Thank you/' returned the invalid. "Concha, please give 
orders that the gentiemen's followers shall be well attended to." 

The lady left to give the required instructions to the major- 
domo, and the invalid observed as he stretched himself on the 
bed, still lying on his back : 

"This is the only position I can assume while in bed, for the 
accursed 'thing' will not allow me to rest on either side. When 
I am in bed or when on a lounge, it is always present. If I re- 
cline in a hammock, or in an easy chair, it still accompanies me. 
I can only escape its malign presence when standing, riding on 
horseback or sitting bolt upright on an ordinary chair; as a 
consequence, I walk, stand, ride or sit upright until exhausted 
nature compels me to lie down, and then the infernal 'presence' 
at once occupies its accustomed place on my now shrunken 
breast." He ceased speaking for a brief interval, and then re- 
sumed: "The narcotic Conchita gave me must be more than 
usually potent, for already my nerves are much calmer, and my 
senses are becoming drowsy. Remember your promise and do 
not leave my roof until I awaken." 

In a few moments he was sound asleep and was breathing 
regularly. His breast was uncovered, and I saw nothing resting 
upon it. Occasionally I fancied I could distinguish a faint 
blur on the exposed sternum, but a prolonged look convinced me 
that I was mistaken. I then felt certain there was nothing there, 
so I boldly extended my hand and placed it on the spot, when, 
to my horror, there it was, hard, round and awfully present. It 
appeared to my sense of touch an exact facsimile of a rough, 
rusty, twenty-four pound cannon ball. No longer able to doubt 
the evidence of my senses, or at least of the sense of touch, I 
staggered from the room into the salon and fell upon a sofa, 
exclaiming : 

"Yes, it is there; I can actually feel it; yet it is invisible. 
WShat in God's name can it be?" 

"We well know what it is," exclaimed the tortured wife, who 
sat weeping on a chair near by. . 

"Madam/" I cried, as 1 turned somewhat fiercely upon her. 
"There is some horrid. Bome awful mystery connected with the 
presence of that infernal, unnamahlc 'tiling/ You say you know 
what it is; what, then, in God's name, is it?" 

"Yes, sir," answered the sad woman, "there is, at least, a har- 
rowing history attached to thai devilish 'presence/ and I. sir, 
I, poor, unfortunate, miserable being that I am, am the involun- 
tary cause of its baleful appearance. My foolish credulity and 
insane jealousy brought about a scoundrel s death, and this be- 
wildering persecution of my adored husband. While numerous 
persons have felt the 'thing.' no our. excepting my poor husband 
and the villain he killed, ever saw it, Robert will doubtless tell 
you the horrid story, I neither can nor will." 

At that moment, a pretty little girl, about six years old, en- 
tered the parlor, and, perceiving thai her mother was crying, 
ran to her. threw her little anus around her neck and endeavored 
to console her. I respected the poor woman's grief and lefl the 
room and went out beyond the wall, and sal down under the 

grateful shade of the wide-spreading branches of a huge pecan 

owful household until a » 
called me to partake of a plentiful merinda (lunch.) Dona 
charming child accompanied me to the table. 
The pooi- woman said but little. The innocen of the 

child diverted me somewhat, yet I was glad when the lady arose 
and asked me if I would take a "siesta" or a ride over the 

ranch with the major domo. As I was convinced that I would 

not sleep. I elected to go with the major domo. I was 300 
I inced that Don Roberto was a very rich man. Thousands of ca- 
bal f-wild horses fed on the ri( 
of the river bottom, and several fields of corn, eomp 
man I belonged to him. 

"lie is a very rich man." observed the major domo. "It is also 
at he has large sums of money in ban'; al San 
ami Austin." 
I then hinted of the terrible "presence" that so persecuted 
him. 



"Si, seiior." returned the man, as he devoutly crossed himself, 
'" a great many believe that the evil on aim for his 

sins. Bnl I don anything of the kind. II. i is not a 

ii. On ii a very good one. It is true he 

killed a man, bul il was in a fair light, and the man was his 
bitter enemy. No, a thousand times no, Don Roberto is a good 
Christian, and the evil one (again he made the sign of the cross) 
cannot have power over him." 

"Then why should that infernal 'thing' persecute him?" 

"That is more than 1 can tell. But, senor," he added, re- 
proachfully, "you must excuse me; 1 do not care to talk about 
the matter." 

We enjoyed a long and pleasant ride, and returned to the 
hacienda just before sundown, where I found a plentiful and, 
in reality, elegant dinner awaiting me. The lady and the little 
girl accompanied me. After dinner the child challenged me to 
play checkers with her. Notwithstanding her few years, she 
played a good game, and beat me fairly several times. When 
she wearied of the pastime her mother hade me good-night and 
led her from the room. A servant showed me to my quarters 
for the night, but soon re-appeared with a bottle of burgundy 
and six freshly-made cheroots, which she placed on a little table 
near the bed. After inquiring if I needed anything more, and 
assuring herself that the water in the "olla" was fresh, she bade 
me a smiling "buenos noehes" and left the room, closing the 
door behind her. 

I never touch alcoholic liquors, and seldom partake of wine, 
but I freely confess that the remarkable experiences of the day, 
as they recurred to my memory, together with the situation of 
my room, which was in an isolated wing of the vast building, 
somewhat unnerved me. So I drank several glasses of the rich 
Chambertin, smoked four of the cheroots and then, without un- 
dressing, threw myself on the bed and slept soundly until 1 was 
awakened, early the next morning, by a knock at my door. I 
speedily opened it, and was confronted by the maid-servant who 
had shown me to my bed the night before. After a pleasaDt 
salutation she asked me if I would have my coffee in my room 
or join Don Roberto in the dining hall. I told her I would take 
my coffee with her master. I promptly made my toilet and 
proceeded to the dining hall, where the Don was awaiting me. 
He courteously welcomed me, motioned to a chair and asked me 
how I had passed the night. I assured him that I had slept 
soundly, but noticing that I involuntarily looked at his breast, 
he smiled wearily and remarked : 

"No. 'It' is not present now. In fact 'It' seldom appears 
save when I am compelled by weariness to lie on my bed. But, 
come, let us drink our coffee." 

During the light meal we conversed on different subjects, but 
when we had finished, he suddenly asked me if I would like to 
hear the story of his life. Wiien I answered that I most as- 




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28 



SAN" FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 3, 1907. 



suredly would, he lit a cheroot, motioned me to do the same, 
and spoke as follows : 

'■I am thirty-two years old and was born in the Stale of \ n- 
ginia. In my early" infancy my father trecked, as the Dutch 
say, across the then wilderness to the flourishing business center, 
St. Louis. Mo. He opened a trading depot and soon became a 
wealthy merchant. I was educated at a well-known academy, and 
at the age of 21 years my father took me into his business as a 
partner. 

•'During my academic career, I became acquainted with a 
young fellow whom I will simply rail John. From the moment 
we met we seemed to entertain a rooted antipathy tor each other; 
Whr I disliked him I cannot say, for he certainly then was a 
fine", manly, handsome youth. Neither could he explain why he 
disliked me, fur at that time I was very popular, both at the in- 
stitution and in society. Just as we were about to graduate both 
became enamored of the charming Mexican Senorita Concha 
Sanchez. Our rivalry deepened into the deadliest hatred. One 
day he insulted me, and 1 knocked him down. An ugly fight 
followed. After a prolonged and at times doubtful battle a 
fortunate blow laid him almost senseless on the ground. When 
he recovered somewhat he approached me, his line features al- 
most disfigured with the blows they hail received, and said 
fiercely : 

""Gray, you have defeated me fairly, and are perhaps the 
best man of the two. But revenge is sweet. If it takes twenty 
years to do it, 1 will crush you." 

"He turned his back upon me and walked away. 

"I never saw him again for several years. I also was badly 
battered, but during my enforced retirement I was informed thai 
Conchita was at first inclined to sj'mpathize with the beaten 
champion, but when she was told of the bitter oath of vengeance 
he had sworn, she became my decided partisan. We were soon 
engaged, and somewhat later, when 1 became my father's part- 
ner, I led her to the altar. But I was not long in discovering 
that my wife desired to return to her relatives at El Paso. So 
I induced my father to dissolve our partnership, and resolved lo 
open a business in that town, i was more inclined to take this 
step from the fact that I had three brothers, one who was old 
enough to till the place I had vacated. I purchased a valuable 
invoice of goods and made the long journey with them to Santa 
Fe, New Mexico. I disposed of hall' my wares, ami then went to 
and settled permanently at El Paso, where the happy Concha 
once more joined her home circle. I opened a trading depot, 
and it was not long before I became a prosperous merchant. In 
the course of time the stork brought us a baby girl, and we were; 
supremely happy. 

"One morning, my former enemy, John, walked into my office 
and with a smile held out his hand. 

"Gray." he said, "let us forget old antipathies. Wte arc men 
new. To tell the truth, I always secretly admired you. and 
my hatred was based upon an unworthy sentiment id' envy." 

•He looked so manly and so handsome thai I Eorgoi my pre- 
vious enmity, grasped his proffered hand, and we sat down and 
entered into a pleasant conversation. 

"About this time a fellow-merchant died. When his will was 
read, it was found that he had named me his sole executor. His 
family consisted of his widow and a very handsome daughter. 
My wife had always disliked this girl, but I never knew it until 

long afterwards. My duties as executor often compelled to 

visit the widow, but although 1 occasionally imagined thai Con- 
chita was gradually growing cold towards me. I was conscious 
that I had given her no cause, and was equally certain thai I 
could again win her affection. 

"One Sunday morning, as T was standing in Eroni of the 
church, awaiting my wife, who was hearing mass, a young man 
grossly insulted me. I caught him by the shoulder am! ash id 
him what he meant. 

'"You have ruined my betrothed. Tepa Vargas/ be crier], 
'You are a scoundrel and a villain.' 

"'I was utterly thunderstruck at this astounding accusation, 
and endeavored to reason with him. but he was crazy with re- 
sentment and jealousy. I Hung him from me and turned lo I he 
little crowd that had assembled, and inquired if any one pres- 
ent had heard rumors connecting my name with Pepa's. One 
gentleman, a valued friend, after a moment's hesitation, an- 
swered : 

"Yes, amigo; yesterday the matter was mention,. ,1 in my pres- 
ence, but Ijsaid no attention to it, as I looked upon it as a piece 



of malicious slander that would be promptly stifled.' 

'"Well/ I returned, 'if it was a woman who started that lying 
rumor, 1 shall hold her nearest male relative responsible. If it 
should prove to be a man. God help him.' 

"The crowd gradually dispersed. Just as Concha was coming 
out of the church, John joined us. To my surprise, she greeted 
him somewhat effusively, and invited him to dine with us. The 
invitation was accepted. That afternoon a messenger from young 
Jorge Valdez, Pepa's jealous lover, handed me a challenge from 
thai gentleman. I accepted it and turned the messenger over to 
John lo arrange all the details of the coming meeting. Xoxi 
morning we met. The first time my pistol missed lire. He 
claimed a second shot. He again missed me and I fired in the 
aii. lie demanded -lill another shot, hut the seconds interfered. 
I then stepped forward and said : 

" 'I wish Mr. Valdez to know thai never has anything passed 
between hi- I lei rotlr 'd and myself that could warrant the lyincr 
report thai has been circulated.' 

"I left the field accompanied by John. When I reached my 
1 < loncha met me at the door. 

"'So you have fought with Valdez?' she exclaimed. 

"''Yes. although utterly Innocent, 1 gave him the meeting he 
demanded.' 

"'Innocent.!' she cried. 'Innocent, indeed: scoundrel and 
villain that you are. I have undoubted proof that you have been 
false to me, ami that infamous Pcpa has taken my place in your 
heart. From this moment I disown you." and the furious woman 
actually spat at. me. 

"That night Concha left my house, taking our child with her. 
Where she went. I never could discover. She left no trace, and 
disappeared as completely as though the sea had Bwallowed her 
up. John also disappeared at the same time, and those who 
knew us, loudly asserted that my wife had fled with him. Ap- 
pearances certainly were against her. My grief at her sin and 
folly, and the loss of my beloved child, was so great that I was 
prostrated by a dangerous attack of brain fever, and for days 
was delirious. When T recovered, I promptly arranged my busi- 
ness affairs and traveled to Santa fe. New Mexico. 1 bad been 
informed lhat John was there, and I determined to seek him. 




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AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



29 



>vi„'ii I arrived a1 Santa 1-v I found thai I had do( been mis- 
taken. Be was there. 1 confronted him, and accused him of 
the abduction oJ' my wife. He denied the charge, bui I re- 
iterated it and challenged him. We met. Strange to say, thai 
time also my pistol missed fire, and John fired in the air. 
the matter rested, but 1 felt convinced that he was guilt] and 
determined to avenge myself in another fashion. li<- was en- 
gaged in various speculations whirl) required the use of large 
sums of money, and he had several notes pending. It is suffi- 
cient to say that I worked unseen, and through various agents. 
Within a year I accomplished his utter ruin. 

"I was returning to Santa Fe one morning from a shorl ex- 
cursion into the country when I was overtaken by John jusl as 
I was going to enter a canyon that led to the town. I was, 
strange to say, unarmed, having forgotten to take my revolver 
with me the day before. He accused me of having ruined him. 
I acknowledged that I had done so. 

'• 'Gray.' he asserted, 'I never eloped with your wife. Where 
she is t have never known. But I did turn her against you. I 
forged letters purporting to have been written by you to Pepa, 
and found means, through her old nurse, Chepa, to have her see 
and read them. She was convinced of your guilt and fled. It 
was I who started that false rumor regarding you and Pepa. 
Wshen T offered you my hand in El Paso it was with the intention 
of eventually injuring you. I have always hated you. When 
youths together yon beal me in fight; you won the woman I 
loved, and you have just succeeded in rendering me a bankrupt. 
One of us shall never leave this spot alive. Dismount, draw your 
weapon and let us have it out.' 

"We both dismounted. 

" 'I am not armed. How can we fight unless you lend me a 
pistol?' I said. 

"'Then die,' he shouted, and tired point-blank at me. Al- 
though slightly wounded I picked up a round cannon ball-like 
stone lying at my feet and struck him in the face with it before 
he could fire a second time. He fell, and I again raised thi 
stone and flung it with all my force upon his unprotected breast. 
I heard the bones crunch as his body made a few spasmodic 
movements, and — almost as quick as it takes to relate it — he 
lay dead before me. 

"I mounted my horse and rode slowly to the town. Suddenly 

T heard a slighl noise, and looking behind me, I saw the ac- 
cursed round stone with which 1 had killed .lohn rolling along 

on my track and Eollowing me. If I rode fasl ii followed as 

quickly. I bad to cross a wide, shallow si ream. And. oh, God. 
the infernal stone rolled over its surface and still followed on. 
I left, Santa tV as soon as the Coroner's Jury had exonerated 
me, and in a few days reached El Paso. The nexl day after my 
arrival my wife, who had been hidden by her relatives, came to 
me, fell upon her knees, and humbly begged mv forgiveness. 
The fact mat she had never violated her marriage vows was 
soon made evident. This important truth rendered me almost 
happy, and we determined to leave El Paso, where we had suf- 
fered so much. I bought this ranch and settled permanently 
here. 

"A year passed, during which I once more experienced happi- 
ness in the so, c M od mv repentant wife and beloved child. One 
morning, to my horror, as T awoke after a restless night, 1 found 
the stone lying on nn chest. It has constantly appeared to me 
ever sin..' whenever I lie down. Two jo 1 was a strong, 

hearty, stalwart, full-chested man. To-day I am a physical 

. and the accursed 'wing' has literally worn a hollow in 
11 eventually wear me into the grave." 
Here the p d. With a weary smile he 

me farewell, and pointed to a window, through which T saw that 
my men were mounted and awaiting me. I shook ban/-, with 

ind bis wife, kissed the little one. left tin lounted 

my horse and rode off. I never saw him again, but heard that 
ut a yeai after my visit. * * * 
"Young man." continued mv host, "vou have heard that 
Strang It seems almost incredible and beyond 

but I swear by the hope 1 enfc ion meeting 

of my long-departed but worshiped wife in that mysterious 
'beyond,' that every word of it is absolutely true." 




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30 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 3, 1907. 



TWO "DREADNAUGHTS" FOE THE U. S. NAVY. 

Two battleships, each of about 20,000 tons displacement, and 
to cost, exclusive of armor and armaments, not more than six 
million dollars apiece, are to he built for the United States navy. 
It is expected that the cost of each of these American "Dread- 
naughts," when completely equipped and ready to do battle, will 
be about ten million dollars. The naval board on construction 
called for sketches and designs for the vessels from shipbuilders 
and naval constructors. The sketches and plans sent in were 
submitted to a naval committee on design, at the head of which 
was Assistant Secretary Newberry. The committee reported 
that the most suitable design was one for a 510-foot vessel, hav- 
ing the officers' quarters at the forward end. The committee 
expressed the opinion that vessels of this design would carry as 
heavy armor and as powerful armament as any known vessels of 
their class ; would have as high speed as is practicable for ships 
of their type and the greatest practicable readiness for action. 
They would be able to carry 2,300 tons of coal in their bunkers, 
would have a trial speed of 21 knots, their length on the load 
water line being 510 feet, and their extreme beam about 85 feet. 
Their hulls are to be protected by a belt of armor eight feet wide 
on the water line, with a maximum thickness of eleven inches. 
The armament of the proposed vessel consists of a main 
battery of ten 12-inch breech-loading rifles, and a secondary 
battery of fourteen 5-inch rapid-fire guns, four 3-pounder salut- 
ing guns, four 1-poimder semi-automatic guns, two 3-inch field- 
pieces, two machine guns and two submerged torpedo tubes. The 
main battery is to be arranged in such a manner as to give a 
broadside fire one-quarter greater than that of any existing bat- 
tleship. It is believed that the average elevation of the axis 
of the guns will be greater than that of any existing battleship, 
and that a great advantage will thus be secured in long-range 
firing in any weather. The interior of the vessels will be sub- 
divided into compartments in such a manner as to afford the 
highest possible degree of protection to the vital parts of the 
ships. The total weight of the hulls and armor of the proposed 
vessels is nearly 3,000 tons greater than the largest battleship 
ever built. 

The request for bids attracted an unusually large number of 
ship-builders and naval constructors. The successful bidders 
were the Newport News Shipbuilding Company, with a bid of 
$3,987,000, and the Eore River Shipbuilding Company of 
Quincy, Mass., with a bid of $4,377,000. 

The armor was divided into four classes, according to the 
difficulty of making it of the necessary shape. For 7,956 tons of 
class A armor, the lowest bid was $410 per ton; for 952 tons of 
class "B" armor the lowest bid was $400 per ton, which was also 
the lowest bid for armor of classes "C" and "~D." 



THE SAN JUAN PACIFIC RAILROAD. 

Work is proceeding rapidly on the San Juan Pacific Railroad, 
which is to be a link of the San Joaquin Valley and Western 
Railway already surveyed from Fresno to Watsonville. The San 
Juan Pacific Railroad will cross the main line of the Southern 
Pacific Company at, Chittenden. The Southern Pacific Com- 
pany was at first unwilling to grant permission to the new rail- 
road to cross its tracks, but when the cost of tunneling under 
or building a bridge over its lines (which cost, is borne by the 
two railroads equally) was pointed out by the Chief Engineer 
of the new line, the Harriman Company yielded. The contrac- 
tors have a large force of men and mules employed in grading, - 
filling and other construction work, and will employ them until 
Hollister, eight miles east of San Juan, is reached. Al Ibillis- 
ter the force of men and animals will lie doubled, and the work 
will be pushed on to Fresno. Some of the small land-owners 
demanded an exorbitant price for their property, and it seemed 
likely that the railroad would have to pay. since suits for rnn- 
demnation would cause a delay of two years at le.ist; but the Safl 
Juan Portland Cement Company proved the deus ex machina 
to solve the difficulty. This company held a franchise lor an 
electric railway along the county road, and induced the Super- 
visors to substitute steam for electricity in the wording of the 
franchise. The railroad company was then able to turn the tables 
on the surprised farmers, who will now receive less than they 
would have done had they accepted the company's original nlfer. 
A spur line will be built into the property of the San Juan 
Portland Cement Company, which will supply much freight to 
the railroad. 



JAMES BUCHANAN C& CO., Ltd. 

OF LONDON 

Your attention is respectfully called to the excellence and high 
conservative standing of 

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Please do not forget these goods when ordering 
Yours Sincerely, 

VARNEY W. GASKILL, 
Oakland, 373 13th St. Pacific Coast Manager 



BANKING 



The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

With which are amalgamated the Bank of British Columbia, the Halifax 
Banking: Co. and the Merchants' Bank of Prince Edward Island. 
HEAD OFFICE— TORONTO. 

Paid-up Capital $10,000,000. Reserve Fund $6,000,000 

Aggregate Resources, over $113,000,000 

B. E. WALKER, President. ALEX. LAIRD. General Manager 

LONDON OFFICE— 60 Lombard St., L. C. 

NEW YORK OFFICE— 16 Exchange Place. 

BRANCHES IN BRITISH COLUMBIA— Atlin, Cranbrook. Fernlt 
Greenwood, Kamloops, Ladysmtth, Nanalmo, Nelson, New Westminster, 
Penticton, Prince Rupert, Princeton, Vancouver (3), and Victoria. 

lUKON TERRITORY— Dawson and White Horse. 

UNITED STATES— Portland. Seattle and Skagway (Alaska.) 

OTHER BRANCHES — Alberta. 26; Saskatchewan. 18; Manitoba, 20; 
Ontario and Quebec, 62; Maritime Provinces, 19. 

BANKERS IN LONDON— The Bank of England, The Bank of Scot- 
land, Lloyd's Bank, Ltd.. The Union of London, and Smith's Bank Ltd. 

AGENTS IN CHICAGO— The First National Bank. 

AGENTS IN NEW ORLEANS— The Commercial National Bank. 

SAN FRANCISCO— Main office, 326 California St. Branch— Cor. Van 
Ness and Eddy. 
A. KAINS. Manager. BRUCE HEATHCOTE, Asst. Manager. 

Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco 

Building at 706 Market St., Opposite Third. 
Guaranteed Capital, $1,000,000 Paid-up Capital. $300,000 

Surplus, $320,000. Assets. $10,000,000 

James D. Phelan, President; John A. Hooper. First Vice President; James K. Momtt, Second Vice 
President; George A. Story. Cashier; C. B. Hobson, Asst. Cashier; A. E. Curtis. 2nd Assist. Cashier 

DIRECTORS: James D. Phelan. John A. Hoopor. J. K. Morfilt. Frank J. Sullivan. Rudolph 
Spreclcels. Robert McElroy. Chas. Holbrook. J. C. McKinslry. Rolla V. Wall. 

Interest paid on deposits. Loans on approved securities. Deposits may 
be sent by postal order. Wells, Fargo & Co., or exchange on city banks 

The Anglo-Californian Bank, Limited 

Head Office — 18 Austin Friars, London, E. C. 
Capital Authorized. $6,000,000 Paid-up. $1,500,000 

Subscribed, $3,000,000 Reserve Fund. $700,000 

The bank transacts a general banking business, sells drafts, makes 
telegraphic transfers, and Issues letters of credit available throughout 
the world. Sends bills for collection, loans money, buys and sells ex- 
change and bullion. 
IGN. STEINHART, P. N. LILIENTHAL, Managers. 
. FRIEDLANDER. Cashier. 

Central Trust Company of California 

42 Montgomery Street, Corner Sutter. 
Assets, $6,000,000 Paid-up Capital and Reserve, $1,750,000 

Authorized to act as Executor, Administrator, Guardian or Trustee, 
Check accounts solicited. Legal depository for money in Probate Court 
proceedings. Interest paid on Savings Accounts at 3 6-10 per cent per 
annum. 

London, Paris and American Bank, Ltd. 

N. W. COR. SANSOME AND SUTTER STS. 

Subscribed Capital, $2,600,000. Paid-up Capital, $2,000,000 

Reserve Fund, $1,200,000. 

Head Office — 40 Threadneedle St, London, E. C. 

AGENTS — New York — Agency of the London. Paris and American 

Bank, Limited, No. 10 Wall street, N. Y. ; Paris — Messrs. Lazard Freres 

& Cle, 17 Boulevard Poissonler. Draw direct on the principal cities of 

the world. Commercial and Travelers' credits Issued. 

5. Greenebaum ] w 

H. Fleishhacker I Manager. 

R. Altechul. Cashier 

The German Savings &, Loan Society 

526 California St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Guaranteed Capital and Surplus $2,603,766.68 

Capital actually paid up in cash 1,000,000.00 

Deposits, June 29, 1007 38.166.931.28 

Officers — President. F. Tlllmann. Jr.; First Vice-President, Daniel 
Meyer; Second VlcePresident. Emil Rohte; Cashier, A. H. R. Schmidt; 
Assistant Cashier, William Herrmann; Secretary, George Tourny; Assist- 
ant Secretary, A. H. Muller; Goodfellow & Eells, General Attorneys. 

Board of Directors — F. Tillmann, Jr.; Daniel Mever. Emll Rohte. Ie/n. 
Stelnhart, I. N. Walter, N. Ohlandt, J. W. Van Bergen, E. T. Kruse and 
W. S. Goodfellow. 



GOODYEAR RUBBER COMPANY 

R. H. PEASE, President 

Have Returned to Their Old Home. Where They Were Located Before the Fire 

573-579 Market, Street., near Second 

Tel. Temporary 1788 



At list 3, 1907. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



31 



BEHIND THE BILL-BOARDS. 

City-farming bj school-children, and in - in 

entire families, is lecoming an importanl institution in \>« 

York, and much good has resulted. The | pie engaged in tin's 

healthful and profitable occupation have grown in like it, and 
many of them have left the city for the country, where they 

can hare real farms. Anything 'that will get peop] it of the 

city deserves the heartiest support. 

Tin: Children's School Farm was started five years ago on a 
rubbish heap and under diseouraging conditions'. The plot of 
land was sandwiched in between factories and tenements. Child- 
ren who had never heard of a farm swarmed the sidewalks. Now 
it is a beautiful green oasis that, looks refreshing in the environ- 
ments of brick and stone. Mrs. Henry Parsons, who founded the 
garden, and who has carried out its development, had the first 
year only a plot of 114x84 feet. On this a heavy street break- 
ing plow went to work unearthing tin cans, empty bottles, rags, 
stones and other things antagonistic to a fertile soil. At first 
the children of the neighborhood did not take kindly to the farm- 
ing idea. When imestioned as to whether they would rather be 
policemen or farmers, the majority unhesitatingly proclaimed 
themselves as preferring the life of the man with the billy. But 
when the green things began to poke their heads above the 
ground, they became intensely interested. One hundred and 
fifty children got their first taste of gardening that summer, each 
taking care of a tiny plot. The next year the size of the farm 
was increased to 1 00x300 feet, and 347 children were engaged 
in growing things on it. Of these. 145 were girls. There were 
flower beds as well as vegetable plots. In spite of the smallness 
of the farm, the children raised, between July 10th and Novem- 
ber 1st the following: Radishes. :i0,526; beets, 1,745; beans, 
350 quarts; peas, 140 pints; turnips, 942; corn-stalks with ears, 
903; lettuce. 3,000; spinach, 4,000 quarts; kale, 406; cabbage, 
475; celery, 2 plots; endive, 6,632. 

Now the farm has 480 individual plots, each 8x4 feet in size, 
and 38 observation plots, used for the purpose of instruction. 
The plots are equally divided between hoys and girls from nine 
to fourteen years of age. A rivalry has sprung up which insures 
assiduous attention hem- paid to the growing things. Nearly 
one thousand children are accommodated, as one relay works in 
the garden Prom the time it is warm enough to plant seed until 
August. The second relay raises another crop. Still other 
children are on the waiting list, anxious to have plots allotted 
to them. When a young fanner neglects his plot, it is turned 
e\ it to a member of the waiting list. 

Every bii of work mi every plot is done by the owner, even 
to the seeding. To simplify this part of the work, seed planting 
is taught to the little farmers in classes of twenty-five. It has 
been found that a largei number cannot gel a good view of the 
operator at one time. The twen inn two -ides of a hol- 
low square around a pi i d d over by a teacher, who goes 

through the whole operation oi | lanl as the five oi sis or seven 
different b ind o plant. At the end of 

the lesson the twenty-five pupils, seeds in hand, make for their 

i tive plots and unaided repeal the lesson. This work takes 
about one hour. 

ii end in end of the farm not a weed ■ to bi seen, not a 

plant looks jaded. A hint from .it appears, is all that 

is need. v small farmer up in the mark. Bai 

Eorth, eight, nine, ten times late of an afternoon, ::<> the happy 
little Wi arrying full watering pots to empty on tie 

plots. 
This farm ha- |>:i-sed the experimental "I iii other 

ar ones are being established. 
"This farm h,i : Mrs. Parsons, "than 

teach a few hundred children how to grow 9ome veg 
the unruly it has turned activities once des instruc- 

tion and painstaking: it is te ivate care of public 

v. applies oment, jus 

ml a love ' The little farmers have learn 

work i . and many of them can no 

! t doing aie 
useful was ded." 



tor Tillman tells th 'arty that there 



Fairmont* Hotel 

SAN FRANCISCO 
The Most Superbly Situated Hotel in the World 

EUROPEAN PLAN 



All rooms outside; every room with a bath 
Rates $2.50 and upward. Special terms 
to permanent, guests. Management, of 

The PALACE HOTEL COMPANY 



Hotel St. Francis 

Follow 

the 

Gourmet 

Grill R.oom 







% n New 
Jk Poodle 
? :- Dog 
br~ 5 ^ Restaurant 
I -V and 

Ly 11 * 1 NW. Comer 

n0rel Polk 8 Post Sts. 


ft 


J^^»« 


V* 


\i> 


^^^5v rnone San Francisco 
Franklin 2960 



THE FAIRLAWN 



Fruitvale Aveni 
Just Completed. 



Phone Menitt 38 

; and Bellevue Street, Fruitvale. California 

P. H. & M. L. ZAPPETTINI, Proprietors. Everything first class. 



Tassajara 

Hot 

Springs 



Monterey County. Best health and pleasure re- 
sort In California. Eighteen hot mineral springs, 
hot sulphur plunges; wonderful vapor baths; 
trout fishing; $12 to $14. Stage leaves Salinas 
Monday, Wednesday and Friday mornings. Feck 
Information Bureau, 789 Market street, San 
Francisco, or C. W. QUILTY, Tassajara Hot 
Springs, Monterey County. 



W. H. Miller, 

Ukiah. Gal. 



for livery accommodations, Lake and Mendo- 
cino Co., stage for Blue Lakes, Laurel 
Dell, Saratoga Springs, Witter Springs, Up- 
per Lake, Baker Springs, Potter Valley, 
John Day's, Lierly's, Vichy- Springs. 



will Iv ership in the platform if 1 

he convention. Tillman's head is generally pretty 



Carnegie Brick and Pottery Co. 

M. A. MURPHY, General Manager. 

Vitrified Brick. Paving Brick, Fire Brick, Fire Tile, Fire Clay, 

Dust, Drain Tile, Acid Jars, Acid Pipes, Acid Bricks. 

Architectural Terra Cotta. Hollow Tile Fire-Proofing. Semi-Dry 
Tressed Brick. Terra Cotta Chimney Pipe. Brick ami rile Mantels 
Flue Linings. Urns and Vases. Flower Pots. All kinds of Vitrtned 
Salt-Glazed Sewer Pipe. 

Factory: Tesla. Alameda County. Cal. Yards: San Francisco, 
Oakland. Berkeley, San Jose. 

Office — 10th and Division Sts.. San Francisco. 



32 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTBE 



August 3, 1907. 






t?fe numerous small lakes and 


The 


streams adjacent make this resort 


Tallac, 


headquarters for rod fisherman. 


Lake 


San Franciscans are especially 


invited to write for terms for their 


Tahoe, 


families. 


Gal. 


cTW. LAWRENCE £& CO. 




Tallac. 



Gilroy 

Hot 

Springs 



Monte 
Rio 



Open the year round. The springs that HOLD 
THE RECORD for business during 1906. The 
Reasons: Wonderful curative properties of the 
waters; superb service; excellent table; easy of 
access. Every modern improvement has been 
added to this already famous resort. The wat- 
ers contain sulphur, alum, iron, soda, magnesia, 
iodine and traces of arsenic, and are very effi- 
cacious in cases of rheumatism, neuralgia, 
rheumatic gout, kidney and liver diseases, lead 
and mercurial poisoning and all bladder and 
urinary complaints. 

Hunting and trout fishing; amusements of all 
kinds. Our table is our advertisement. Rates 
$12 to $17.50 a week. Baths free. Trains leave 
Third and Townsend streets at 8:30 a. m. Direct 
stage connections for the springs. Send for 
booklet. Address W. J. McDONALD, Proprie- 
tor. 



Hotel 

Bon 

Air 


Newly renovated and now under flrst-class 
management. Hot and cold water in every room. 
Delightfully located in heart of Ross Valley. 
Take Sausalito Ferry to Escalle. Only 45 min- 
utes from San Francisco. Ideal home for busi- 
ness men and families. Open the year round. 
Terms reasonable. For further particulars ad- 
dress STRASSBURGER & PARKER, Postoffice, 
Larkspur, Cal. 



THE SWITZERLAND OF CALIFORNIA. 
Most delightfully situated on banks of Russian 
River. Rates $2 per day, $12 per week For fur- 
ther particulars, address C. F. CARR, Monte 
Rio, Sonoma County, California. 



The 


FOR AN OUTING ON RUSSIAN RIVER. 


$10 per week and up. Everything good. 


Palms 


Tents if desired. H. B. CROCKER, Healds- 
burg, California. 




THE nearest Hot Sulphur Springs to San 
Francisco. Largest mineral water swimming 
tank in the State. No staging. 4 trains daily. 
For information, address THEO. RICHARDS, 
Agua Caliente, Sonoma County, Cal. 



SANTA CRUZ 

The Atlantic City of the Pacific 

World's most beautiful playground 

Never a Dull Moment 

Summer Season opens May 1st 



Grand Opening of New Casino and Bathing 
Pavilion announced later 



Hot 
Springs 



Witter 

Medical 

Springs 



New Ownership and Management. Grandest 
and most accessible of all resorts. Only seven 
miles of beautiful staging. Waters awarded 
first prize at St. Louis Exposition. 

Natural hot ioda, sulphur, plungeand tub baths, 104 to 116 de 
orecs. for rheumatism, malaria and all stomach troubles. Iron and 
B rsenic waters; altitude 1400 feet. Swimming lank, hunting, fine 
fishing, bowling, tennis, croquet, dancing; gas. Expert masseurte 
Round trip. $8. Rates, $10 50 to $16, baths included. Table 
unexcelled. 

Information at any S. P. office or H. H. Mc 
GOWAN, Proprietor and Manager, Paraiso 
Springs, Monterey county, Cal. 



Witter, the most famous medical springs in 
the West. In the heart of the mountains, 
commanding a magnificent view of Clear Lake 
The automobile headquarters of Lake County. 
You can play tennis, ride, bowl, fish and bathe 
in the lakes or climb mountains. In Witter 
Springs you will find a first class place at a 
reasonable rate. 

Write for information to ALBERT J. ARROLL. Manager, 
at the Springs, or to the General Offices of Witter Springs Co., 647 
Van Neis Ave., San Francisco. 



The 

Geysers 
Hot 
Springs 


America's greatest health and pleasure resort. 
Positive cure for rhumatism. stomach trouble. 
Natural mineral steam and hot mineral plunge 
baths. Tepid swimming lake. Good fishing and 
hunting. Climate unsurpassed. Our table 
speaks for Itself. All kinds of outdoor amuse- 
ments; dancing every evening. Livery and 
dairy connected with hotel. Rates, $10 to $14 
per week. Electric lights, telephone and post- 
office in hotel. Round trip tickets via North- 
western Pacific R. R. For further particulars, 
address R. H. CURRY, Proprietor, The Geysers, 
Sonoma County, Cal. 




Skaggs 

Hot 

Springs 


SONOMA COUNTY. Only 4 1-2 hours from 
San Francisco and but 9 miles staging. Stages 
meet both morning and evening trains to and 
from San Francisco at Geyserville. Round-trip 
only $5.10. Terms, $2 a day or $12 a week. 
Reference: Any guest of the past 12 years. In- 
formation at Peck-Judah Bureau, 789 Market 
street. Bryan's Bureau, 1732 Fillmore St., or of 
J. F. Mulgrew. Skaggs, Cal. 



Summer 
Trips 


Before making your choice of a place to 
spend your vacation, get a copy of our 
"SUMMER TRIPS OUTINGS FOR 1907," 
free at our INFORMATION BUREAU. 
THE PECK-JUDAH CO., 789 Market St. 
Sent by Mail for 4c Postage. 




3fn % Itm $ntuv? 



\i the meeting of the incienl Order of Car .strikers, A. D. 2001, Air. Cornelius calls the meeting to order aud makes his 
one re m ai n i n g member to the effect that the strike is still on, that the strike benefits are .-nil coming in, and that 
the member is entitled to tVuu cents a week, and that the balance on hand will go to officers' salaries. Mr. Cornelius if 

living official of the union, and he is confident that the strike will be won soon, and that he will outlive the membership 
of the uni 



Shoes' fitted i£ 




rritfi 



\ 



SHOES FITTED WITH O'SULLIVAN'S "^ HEELS OF NEW 
RUBBER MAKE LIFE OF MEN AND WOMEN WORTH LIVING 

Be calm and quiet; the clatter and clinL of hard leather heels and naili are 
no longer tolerable. 

O'Sullivan heels are made of brand new rubber. Thai's why they give 
the elastic, bounding, comfortable, springy step of youth; that a why they 
outwear leather heels and all other rubber heel*. 

If your dealer hasn't O 'Sullivan's, send 35c. and diagram of your heel to 
the maken . 

O'SULLIVAN RUBBER CO., Lowell. Mas*. 



Neuhaus & Co. i nc 

1618 Ellis Street near Fillmore 



MERCHANT 
TAILORS 



formerly 727-729-731 Mulct SttMt. 



Suits to order from $15.00 up. A fine Piquet Worsted 
or Serge Suit to Order for $20.00 worth $30.00. 

This reduction is made to get you acquainted with our 
new location. Fit and workmanship guaranteed. 



NEUHAUS ®> Co. 



San Francisco 1618 ELLIS ST. near Fillmore 



HOT WATER QUICK 



By a GAS WATER HEATER attached to the 
kitchen boiler. 



Oakland Gas, Light and Heat Company 

13th and Clay Streets, Oakland, Cal. 





VACATION TIME HERE 

WHERE WILL YOU SPEND IT? HOW 

WHAT WILL IT COST? 

Questions often asked 
OUR SUGGESTIONS:- 

Shasta and Mountain Resorts. Klamath and 
Crater Lakes. Lake Tanoe. Yosemite. Kings 
and Kern Canyons. Santa Cruz and Mountain 
Resorts. Boulder. Wrights. Laurel. Mt. 
Hermon. Glenwood. Capitola. Del Monte. 
Monterey. Pacific Grove. Paso Robles Hot 
Springs. El Pizmo. 

Hunting, Fishing, Boating, Bathing, Mountain 
Climbing, Cottage, Tent,, Camp Life, Excellent, 
Hotel Accommodations. Low summer vacation 
rates via 

Southern Pacific 



Ticket. Office, Flood Building 
San Francisco 




3&W PRAKIO««e% 




(£&lif0xnm%bbtxtxstx„ 

Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast. 




VOL. LXXIV 



San Francisco, CaL, August 10, 1907 



No. 6 



The SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor, Fred- 
erick Marriott, at 905 Lincoln avenue, Alameda, California, and at 773 
Market street, San Francisco, Cal. Telephone — Alameda. 1131. San 
Francisco — Temporary 3594. 

Entered as second-class matter, May 12, 1906, at the Postofflce at Ala- 
meda, California, under the act of Congress of March 3, 1879. 

New York office — (where information may be obtained regarding sub- 
scriptions and advertising) — 20C Broadway. C. C. Murphy, representative. 
London Office — 30 Cornhill, E. C, England. George Street & Co. 

All social items, announcements, mining, commercial and financial 
news notes, advertisements or other matter intended for publication, 
in the current number of the NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA AD- 
VERTISER, should be sent to the Alameda office not later than Thurs- 
day morning. 

Already the labor leaders are charging that the new 

Supervisors were chosen from the ranks of the Citizens' Al- 
liance. Could fehey have gone to a better forest for suitable 
timber? 

A "high Government official" says there will be no war 

with Japan. Still the battleships should come anyway, for 
California's ocean-side resorts are in need of a change of at- 
tractions. 

The Los Angeles Times says : "Southern California is the 

greatest winter resort in the world, although it is really in sum- 
mer that it pulls right up alongside of heaven." When did the 
devil move up? 

If we would build coast defenses honestly and defenses 

that arc defenses, there should be no objection to letting other 
nations see and inspect them. There would then be no occa- 
sion for secrecy. 

And so the Democratic, Republican and Labor parties 

will each have iis own ticket in tin 1 field lor municipal officers, 
all of which shows thai the hunger for public fodder has not been 
checked by calamities. 

One of the reasons urged by Scbmitz for release from 

jail is that he cannot attend to the city's business while locked 
up. Why, bless bis dear old soul, that is exactly what he is 
kepi behind the bars for. 

I.os Angeles is all right, and we arc proud that she lives 

in California, hut if she would talk less about San Francisco's 
wickedness she would have more time to attend to her own low- 
cut waists and divided skirts. 

The Chicago News rises to remark that the Windy City 

has the prettiest girls on earth, but you know that there are 
people who do not judge facial beauty by the size of the feet, 
nor by rail-like legs and arms. 

Goat Island's naval contingent has had a set-back, 

socially considered. Secretary Metcalf decides that the daugh- 
ter of 'the island's blacksmith is as eligible to the best that is go- 
ing as the smartest of the smart - 

The labor organizations arc working with might and man 

;md intriguing and 'pheroinp re elect their municipal ticket this 
fall, and if the Republican and Democratic parties continue to 
play the fee], on lines of unyielding partisanship, the labor 
leaders are pretty sure to win out. 

When that pile of I0.iloo.ooo dollars, which is to be used 

in building a new water front, disappears and there appears in its 
the worth of it in dock well- but if 

graft worms arc found in the job— well, may the Lord have 
mercy on the party in power. 

An Eastern exchange has it that a Baroness took a mon- 

kev to table in a crack London hotel recently, and that now the 
smart -sod their intention of buying simians, BO 

they can si i to the fashionable fools. Thank I 

\ i Four Hundred do not do all the silly thai;-. 



For ages the Koreans have worn the "tile" or silk hat, 

and under those hats are some very wise heads. The Korean 
Imperial library is a subscriber to every first-class magazine in 
all countries, and is a great book buyer. 

The prosecution will drop the other cases against Schmitz 

— but the recollection of them will remain with him until time 
shall be no more. That, together with five years behind the 
bars, should satisfy the city, the State and the nation. 

No, Schmitz is not insane. He just fooled around ad- 
miring himself while Ruef got in and gobbled up the dish of 
immunity, and now he is doing the "curse my luck" act, but 
he will come out all right after a quiet rest across the bay. 

Governor Gillette never made a better appointment than 

that made on the 29th of last month of Thomas W. Huntington 
as a member cf the Board of Directors of the Veterans' Home 
at Yountville. Mr. Huntington is fully qualified by tempera- 
ment and education for this responsible position. 

A woman writer in Los Angeles has gone crazy. Her 

delusion takes the form of a belief that the restaurant people arc 
trying to poison her food. I have never had any experience with 
Los Angeles restaurants, but if they deal out the sort of food 
that is served to the patrons of many San Francisco eating 
houses, the Los Angeles lady has a good foundation for her so- 
called delusion. 

Senator Borah's speech to the jury in the Haywood trial 

is as trenchant a piece of reasoning as has ever been set forth in 
a criminal court. Well might Haywood say that he had heard 
all the great criminal lawyers, and' that the man who was trying 
to hang him beat them all. No man can read that argument, 
regardless of the verdict of acquittal, and then doubt that Hay- 
wood has an intimate knowledge of the intrigues of the Stcunen- 
bcrg murder. 

1 was talking the other day to one of the local detective 

sergeants, a personally estimable man. who has managed to re- 
tain his position with the present police department in spite of 
bis stood, honest character. He made the remarkably absurd 
observation, however, that the unspeakable Dinan deserved some 
credit for the order that now prevails in the city in the matter 
of the late street car strike. The poor detective ! I smiled at 
him and reminded him of the fact that it was not the police, 
hut the unions themselves that arc preserving comparative order, 
the unions, craven cowards that they are, having been given 
distinctly to understand that the first riot would be the pal 
for the troops. If there is anything that a law-breaking union- 
ist fears, it is martial law, and well be may ! The crafty leaders 
know full well that too much disorder will result in a thoroughly 
whipped mob. 

Do our people in general live as well as they did b 

(he increase m wages? Prices arc in proportion to new wages, 
so where is the gain to the man who has the "raise?" Bemembei 
there are main who are trying to tit